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Request for Next Steps: 4770k OC

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September 24, 2013 5:22:08 PM

Hello Everyone!

I am a long time stalker and first time poster, I have read countless posts about overclocking the i7 4770k and some of it has taken me as far as I have gotten and others have left me with a ton of questions. My purpose here is to take my CPU as far as I can. I am currently at a stable 4.5ghz @ 1.37v with max load temps around 94c as spikes but a lower average on each core when running AIDA64. The CPU itself is registering about 65c. Idle was actually only 29-32c but today it seems to have jumped almost 6c to 36c, this may be due to the fact that I moved my GPU closer to the CPU.

First things first, here is my component list as it pertains to this OC:

Intel Core i7 4770k (of course)
Asus Maximus VI Hero
16gb (2x8gb) G.SKILL TridentX 2400mhz
Corsair HX750 Power Supply
Noctua NH-D14 CPU Heatsink
Arctic MX-4 Thermal Paste

The BIOS are set to default aside from the changes below:

AI Overclock Tuner: XMP, Profile #1 (all options, IE CPU Strap and BCLK Freq, default as auto/100mhz)
CPU Core Ratio: Sync all cores, 45
CPU Cache Ratio Min/Max: 35
DRAM Frequency: 1600mhz
CPU Power Management: Speedstep Disabled
Core Voltage(Manual): 1.37v (cache is unchanged/auto at 1.078v)
System Agent Voltage(w/ 0.35v Offset): 1.224v
DRAM Voltage: 1.65v
Internal Graphics: Disabled

Everything else is at their stock, or auto, values. I had my CPU stable at 4.5ghz with only 1.35v and the ram at 2400 but it wasn't as stable as I thought so I brought my ram down to 1600 and the volts up just a tad more. I am still trying to see just how far I can get my CPU but I am truly not sure where to make the tweaks or how far I can tweak certain voltages. I tried lowering my RAM to as little as 800mhz with no luck of getting past 4.5ghz and my first venture into messing with the Strap/BCLK was horribly unsuccessful. Either way, I am here and I could really use some guidance!

If anyone could provide me with more information on how to proceed from here, it would be greatly appreciated. Helpful items would include: how far I can safely OC my core/cache/system agent voltages, how to be able to lower my core voltage, which other voltages I should still change, and how to really make the Strap/BCLK work for me.

Thanks in advance and sorry for the wall of text! Below is a link to my bios pics if they would help:

http://s12.photobucket.com/user/Pilsburydohboy/slidesho...

More about : request steps 4770k

a c 353 K Overclocking
September 24, 2013 9:05:04 PM

Your images are password protected, save them and may want ot just try the auto and set it to 4.6 and see what it does
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September 25, 2013 1:18:51 AM

Tradesman1 said:
Your images are password protected, save them and may want ot just try the auto and set it to 4.6 and see what it does


Whoops! Sorry about that, I fixed it. I will give it a shot but I was always under the assumption that auto overclocking is taboo/never works lol. I'll give it a shot as soon as possible and report my findings.

On a side note, you are actually the major person on here that I was reading posts from for advice on my build, it's great to get a reply from you :lol: 
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a b K Overclocking
September 25, 2013 1:24:56 AM

DoHxBoY said:
Tradesman1 said:
Your images are password protected, save them and may want ot just try the auto and set it to 4.6 and see what it does


Whoops! Sorry about that, I fixed it. I will give it a shot but I was always under the assumption that auto overclocking is taboo/never works lol. I'll give it a shot as soon as possible and report my findings.

On a side note, you are actually the major person on here that I was reading posts from for advice on my build, it's great to get a reply from you :lol: 


auto overclocking is looked down upon because it raises your volts extremely high (to ensure stability; but, depending on the quality of your chip, it may or may not need that much) even with low overclocks but, it's still very nice if you want to check and see if your CPU will even go that high.

if your PC boots and it seems stable during a quick stress test of ~10m, you can bump down the voltage little by little making sure you stress test again every time you bump it down to make sure it's still stable.
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a c 231 K Overclocking
September 25, 2013 1:31:18 AM

Most buy memory modules without really investigating what they'll be doing with it, some buy the higher speed memory because the motherboard lists it can run the higher speed modules (OC), but that (OC) reference is for the memory only being overclocked not the CPU.

Your memory controller is on the CPU and it was designed to run 1333mhz or 1600mhz, so you've already discovered on your own you have a problem trying to run the memory at 2400mhz and raising the CPUs multiplier as well, so you've dropped the speed to 1600mhz and that's good.

Since you have dropped to 1600mhz speed you also need to manually drop the DDR3 voltage to 1.50v, and manually reset your timings to 9-9-9-24 using a 2T command rate, that will give you a rock solid memory foundation to successfully raise your CPU multiplier.

These memory module speed claims were only guaranteed at stock CPU speeds, they were never tested or guaranteed to run at the higher CPU multiplier levels.
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September 25, 2013 2:11:25 AM

(I'm failing with the quoting here)
Tradesman1 said:

auto overclocking is looked down upon because it raises your volts extremely high (to ensure stability; but, depending on the quality of your chip, it may or may not need that much) even with low overclocks but, it's still very nice if you want to check and see if your CPU will even go that high.

if your PC boots and it seems stable during a quick stress test of ~10m, you can bump down the voltage little by little making sure you stress test again every time you bump it down to make sure it's still stable.


Unfortunately it doesn't boot and locks up in BIOS after using the "CPU Level Up" option for 4.6ghz, I am assuming that is the auto OC feature for my board.

4Ryan6 said:

Since you have dropped to 1600mhz speed you also need to manually drop the DDR3 voltage to 1.50v, and manually reset your timings to 9-9-9-24 using a 2T command rate, that will give you a rock solid memory foundation to successfully raise your CPU multiplier.

These memory module speed claims were only guaranteed at stock CPU speeds, they were never tested or guaranteed to run at the higher CPU multiplier levels.


I bought them knowing I would most likely have to underclock them but figured I would get the faster ram just in case my CPU really couldn't reach high clocks :) 
I didn't know about dropping the volts or timings though, thanks for the info, I'll give it a shot! Since the default is 1333, should I drop them to 1333 and, if so, what would the timings be for them then?
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a b K Overclocking
September 25, 2013 2:25:58 AM

RAM timings and voltages are on a sticker on the side of your modules but, it'll be the rated timings for 2400MHz. for 1600MHz standard JEDEC should be 9-9-9-24 w/ 1.5v. I wouldn't drop the speed of the memory modules below 1600MHz as Haswell should be more than capable of handling it even with very high overclocks on the CPU.
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Best solution

a c 231 K Overclocking
September 25, 2013 2:32:55 AM

DoHxBoY said:
I didn't know about dropping the volts or timings though, thanks for the info, I'll give it a shot! Since the default is 1333, should I drop them to 1333 and, if so, what would the timings be for them then?


As high a quality as the G.Skill Trident is, you could try 1333mhz at 7-7-7-21 2T at 1.50v, and see if it will run at Cas7, there's no guarantees, but you can try it.

1333mhz at Cas7 is basically the same performance level of 2133mhz at Cas11, but 1333mhz or 1600mhz is not overclocking the CPUs memory controller, and is not adding extra heat to the CPU from overclocking it, and also increasing the longevity of the CPU, and allowing you to reach a higher multiplier.


Share
September 25, 2013 4:06:20 AM

4Ryan6 said:
As high a quality as the G.Skill Trident is, you could try 1333mhz at 7-7-7-21 2T at 1.50v, and see if it will run at Cas7, there's no guarantees, but you can try it.1333mhz at Cas7 is basically the same performance level of 2133mhz at Cas11, but 1333mhz or 1600mhz is not overclocking the CPUs memory controller, and is not adding extra heat to the CPU from overclocking it, and also increasing the longevity of the CPU, and allowing you to reach a higher multiplier.
Great, thank you both for the information on the RAM.

I am currently at work for a little bit, but my last attempt for 4.6 resulted in failure as usual. I set my RAM timings to 9-9-9-24 2T @ 1600mhz, It boots to the log in screen and then I get the blue sadface of doom as soon as I press a key. I guess that's a good sign, that it is at least booting, but still unstable. For giggles I also tried dropping my voltages down to 1.35 with the new timings and didn't have any luck getting it to run 4.5 @ 1.35v. It sucks because I did have it running a stress test for over 30 minutes of 4.5 @ 1.35v the other day, and now I can't get it to run for more than 5 minutes with the lower voltage.

So, to recap, I am still running 4.5 @ 1.37v. Another thing I'd like to note, it seems that at full load during AIDA64 my voltages (according to CPU-z) actually jump from 1.376v to 1.39v, is this a safe level or is there anyway to prevent it from jumping that high? If this is a safe level, maybe I can try 1.39/1.4 as a last ditch to get to 4.6, but it doesn't seem like I am going to get there just yet.

What other changes could I try, anything like the input voltage, or more system agent voltage? What are safe levels for them as well? I'd like to reach a safe limit but if I have to settle at 4.5, I shall. 
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a b K Overclocking
September 25, 2013 4:23:19 AM

for safe voltages, id say 1.45v is the limit but, (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=...) around ~20:30, an intel rep describes that he always tells people not to raise voltage above 10%.

AIDA64 will stress your CPU very intensely and LLC (load-line calibration) is what's causing the rise to 1.39v which is normal, however, im sure the voltage will drop down in games and other common day-to-day applications.

hmm, do you have XMP enabled still by any chance?
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September 25, 2013 4:40:53 AM

mr1hm said:
for safe voltages, id say 1.45v is the limit. AIDA64 will stress your CPU very intensely and LLC (load-line calibration) is what's causing the rise to 1.39v which is normal, however, im sure the voltage will drop down in games and other common day-to-day applications.

hmm, do you have XMP enabled still by any chance?


That gives me a good bit of wiggle room then, but I doubt the temps will be manageable with 1.4v. Oh, I know there is nothing I will ever run that will stress my CPU as much as AIDA64 :lol: . That's one of the reasons I am not worried about AIDA spiking my cores to 95c considering the average is only 70c and it would run much lower than that with any game I'd be playing.

As far as XMP goes, yes I do have it still turned on. Think that would make a difference?
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a c 231 K Overclocking
September 25, 2013 5:19:23 AM

DoHxBoY said:
4Ryan6 said:
As high a quality as the G.Skill Trident is, you could try 1333mhz at 7-7-7-21 2T at 1.50v, and see if it will run at Cas7, there's no guarantees, but you can try it.1333mhz at Cas7 is basically the same performance level of 2133mhz at Cas11, but 1333mhz or 1600mhz is not overclocking the CPUs memory controller, and is not adding extra heat to the CPU from overclocking it, and also increasing the longevity of the CPU, and allowing you to reach a higher multiplier.
Great, thank you both for the information on the RAM.

I am currently at work for a little bit, but my last attempt for 4.6 resulted in failure as usual. I set my RAM timings to 9-9-9-24 2T @ 1600mhz, It boots to the log in screen and then I get the blue sadface of doom as soon as I press a key. I guess that's a good sign, that it is at least booting, but still unstable. For giggles I also tried dropping my voltages down to 1.35 with the new timings and didn't have any luck getting it to run 4.5 @ 1.35v. It sucks because I did have it running a stress test for over 30 minutes of 4.5 @ 1.35v the other day, and now I can't get it to run for more than 5 minutes with the lower voltage.

So, to recap, I am still running 4.5 @ 1.37v. Another thing I'd like to note, it seems that at full load during AIDA64 my voltages (according to CPU-z) actually jump from 1.376v to 1.39v, is this a safe level or is there anyway to prevent it from jumping that high? If this is a safe level, maybe I can try 1.39/1.4 as a last ditch to get to 4.6, but it doesn't seem like I am going to get there just yet.

What other changes could I try, anything like the input voltage, or more system agent voltage? What are safe levels for them as well? I'd like to reach a safe limit but if I have to settle at 4.5, I shall. 


Try using this guide, I've read through it and it looks good to me, good luck to you!

http://www.overclockers.com/3step-guide-to-overclock-intel-haswell

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a b K Overclocking
September 25, 2013 5:57:42 AM

DoHxBoY said:
mr1hm said:
for safe voltages, id say 1.45v is the limit. AIDA64 will stress your CPU very intensely and LLC (load-line calibration) is what's causing the rise to 1.39v which is normal, however, im sure the voltage will drop down in games and other common day-to-day applications.

hmm, do you have XMP enabled still by any chance?


That gives me a good bit of wiggle room then, but I doubt the temps will be manageable with 1.4v. Oh, I know there is nothing I will ever run that will stress my CPU as much as AIDA64 :lol: . That's one of the reasons I am not worried about AIDA spiking my cores to 95c considering the average is only 70c and it would run much lower than that with any game I'd be playing.

As far as XMP goes, yes I do have it still turned on. Think that would make a difference?


it certainly could, even though you manually changed your DRAM frequency and timings, XMP is a profile that will set speed/timings/voltage for you. id say make sure that your RAM changes to 1600MHz aren't being overridden. or, you could just change it right now to Manual
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September 25, 2013 6:16:52 AM

I'm not on Intel's team, but 94c seems..... really @#$%ing hot.
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a c 139 K Overclocking
September 25, 2013 10:21:26 AM

DukeOvilla said:
I'm not on Intel's team, but 94c seems..... really @#$%ing hot.


You're right - it is VERY hot, and should be avoided. The problem here is that 1.37 v. is too much voltage. At 1.35 v. you start to risk damage to the CPU due to electromigration.

I am relatively new to Haswell having just purchased my system a couple of months ago. However, I have done a lot of research on overclocking Haswell chips. Based on that research, I have set a limit of 1.3 v. that I do not want to go above for VCore on my system.

Here is a guide that may help you, DoHxBoy: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-1722630/intel-god-...
Intel God suggests changing some additional settings which may help you attain a stable OC with your system.

Good luck!

Yogi

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September 25, 2013 12:47:08 PM

4Ryan6 said:


Try using this guide, I've read through it and it looks good to me, good luck to you!

http://www.overclockers.com/3step-guide-to-overclock-intel-haswell



Hello Again everyone,

Ryan, this link is actually the first article I ever read and it brought me pretty far. I figured I hit a brick wall and thought I would come look for more specific tweaks for my current settings :lol: 

A bit of an update, I think I have determined that my CPU may just not be able to handle 4.6 at all and 4.5 works but, as yogi and others have said, it requires a bit too much voltage to be trustworthy. I tried everything that I know, messed with different boot straps, memory timings, and things just aren't working very well.

I think my next step, at this point, is trying to get my CPU running as cool as possible with at 4.4ghz.

I do have one more question, what would be the best way change the LLC to prevent it from overvolting my core? I currently have it set to 1.3 for the 4.4 to be stable (which I could probably lower, will have to try when I get home) but in the OS it constantly bumps it to 1.344-1.360.. that's quite a large amount over the manually set 1.3v.

I'll try to dig around in the posts provided, as I know I've read about it somewhere in there, but I figured if anyone knew it off the top of their heads I'd ask :lol: 

Thanks again for all the help and information everyone!

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a c 353 K Overclocking
September 25, 2013 2:56:48 PM

Can leave the DRAM under XMP at 2400 and stick with the 4.5 you had, if it failed at 4.6, it may just be that the CPU can't carry 4.6 without more vCore and you are already high with your vCore where you were, can try dropping the DRAM to 2133 and leave timings as is and then try 4.6, but think you may have hit the wall for your individual CPU - 4.5 is good for the CPU, many can'' even hit 4.4
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September 27, 2013 11:17:21 AM

I sorta wanted to chime in on DoHxBoY's thread as I have been following it a bit. I am also working on a new build with a 4770K and ASUS Hero. Maybe I can bounce ideas off of you with what you tried so far, maybe I can contribute as well. Here are my specs and what I have running stable so far. Maybe it adds some additional insight on what you are trying. If you want me to try anything on my end let me know since we have the same board.

Intel Core i7 4770k
Asus Maximus VI Hero
16gb (2x8gb) Corsair Vengeance Pro 1866
PCP&C Silencer 750w Quad Power Supply (aka the old workhorse)
Thermalright Ultra 120 eXtreme CPU Heatsink
IC Diamond TIM

The BIOS are set to default aside from the changes below:

AI Overclock Tuner: XMP
CPU Core Ratio: Sync all cores, 43
CPU Cache Ratio Max: 35 (min on auto)
Core Voltage Override: Adaptive
Additional Turbo Mode CPU Core Voltage: 1.25
DRAM Voltage: 1.5v

Initially I had a terrible time even getting an overclock at all, 4.2 wouldn't even hold at 1.3v. However, I was using the OCCT stress test, which seemed to bomb out(BSOD) everything except the stock speed. I start using AIDA64 and had much more success. Not sure if OCCT doesn't play nice with Hasewell. My initial goal was 4.3GHz to get stable. I am still tweaking and maybe could go with a lower voltage but 43 @ 1.25v seems to do the trick. My Cache ration is 35 and cache voltage is auto. During my stress tests I set the voltage mode to MANUAL, and then switched it back to adaptive to take advantage of the power saving. AIDA64 topped out at 87C with 43 @ 1.25v on a 20 minute run, the typical temps hovered around 75-80C for the most part but there were a few times it jumped to mid 80C for some reason. I then turned it to adaptive and ran 3DMark and Unigine Heaven benchmarks. I also played 30-60 minutes of each Tomb Raider and BF3. The higher temps I got from any of these was BF3 which topped out at about 70C. This is also the only one of the 4 that caused the VID to jump from 1.25 to 1.32 in adaptive, but only for a split second on a few occasions, per the AIDA64 graph had in the background. My understanding is adaptive does not guarantee a stable vcore setting, its more of a best effort. If the CPU wants more it will give it, which is why you don't use it for stress test.

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a c 353 K Overclocking
September 27, 2013 1:34:03 PM

Thanx for the info
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