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Red switch on the back of the PSU

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September 29, 2013 6:12:27 PM

Hi, i recently started to build a new computer from scratch. And i noticed that there was a red switch on the back of my PSU that switches the number from 115/225. Paying no attention i switched it to 225 ( I live in the US ) i was curious to see if the PSU would power without it being connected to the motherboard, as i plugged it in i noticed that the lamp nest to me dimmed and that made my heart jump a little. I did some research and found out that if i set it to 225 it would fry my computer. Now the PSU wasn't connected to anything and it didn't turn on does this mean that my PSU is perfectly fine or did I fry it by accident?

My PSU is. http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

There is no red switch in the picture but there is on my psu
Thanks!

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a c 704 ) Power supply
September 29, 2013 6:16:15 PM

I would replace it anyway since it is an old very crappy version. Anyway people have actually fried stuff with the switch that is to change between the house hold voltage on the PSU, 115 US 220 Europe for example.
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a b ) Power supply
September 29, 2013 6:24:42 PM

It is probably okay, but don't do those kind of experiments with your other parts. :)  You can safely test it by setting it to 115, flip the switch to I (if it has an on/off switch on the back side), then with a bent paper clip short pin 16 and 17 -- the green power on to a black ground. If the fan starts up and it doesn't have an odd (burnt bakelite) odor it's okay. It is safe to do this with the green wire, but don't do it with any of the yellow or red wires, those are the 12V and 5V power wires.

Yes the little red switch usually says 115/225 for the two different voltage levels that are used (actually 120/240V) -- and everywhere in the US is the lower value other than double circuit lines for AC units, electric ovens and such.
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September 29, 2013 6:24:53 PM

rolli59 said:
I would replace it anyway since it is an old very crappy version. Anyway people have actually fried stuff with the switch that is to change between the house hold voltage on the PSU, 115 US 220 Europe for example.


Honestly replacing the PSU is not an option right now but do you think it would still work? The wires weren't connected to anything and it didn't even turn on the lights just dimmed do you think its fine?
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a c 704 ) Power supply
September 29, 2013 6:27:01 PM

Only thing to do is to try it with the switch ion the correct position.
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September 29, 2013 6:29:43 PM

Well Thanks for the fast answers :D  really great site :D  I think i'm just gonna hope for the best im really scared of doing the paper clip thing (I have little experience) but thank you so much for all the answers :D 
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a c 704 ) Power supply
September 29, 2013 6:32:53 PM

Paperclip is easy just turn it on and see if the fan spins, then turn it off.
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September 29, 2013 6:48:48 PM

RealBeast said:
It is probably okay, but don't do those kind of experiments with your other parts. :)  You can safely test it by setting it to 115, flip the switch to I (if it has an on/off switch on the back side), then with a bent paper clip short pin 16 and 17 -- the green power on to a black ground. If the fan starts up and it doesn't have an odd (burnt bakelite) odor it's okay. It is safe to do this with the green wire, but don't do it with any of the yellow or red wires, those are the 12V and 5V power wires.

Yes the little red switch usually says 115/225 for the two different voltage levels that are used (actually 120/240V) -- and everywhere in the US is the lower value other than double circuit lines for AC units, electric ovens and such.


Thank you all so much I found out that there was no burning smell after 4 tries :D  and that my fans were spinning (in the wrong direction too!) Again thanks all for the fast replies have a good one!
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