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Modem->Router->PC, Router bottleneck

Hello. I upgraded to a 120Mbit line today and I have a problem with it.

When I hardwire the PC to the modem, I get the connection I should (exactly 120Mbit), however when I route it through the router through cables, the speed doesn't go past 70Mbit.

I tried disabling the wireless and fiddle with all the settings as well as complete factory reset but I didn't solve this.

My router is Belkin F5D7234-4 v3, which should be 300Mbit.

Any ideas? Is there anything I can do other than replacing the router, which might or might not solve my issue?

Thanks in advance.
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  1. According to a Newegg link:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833314039

    from Amazon:
    http://www.amazon.com/BELKIN-F5D7234-4-Wireless-802-11g-4-Port54Mbps/dp/B003Z4F3AK

    and from Belkin:
    http://cache-www.belkin.com/support/dl/man_f5d7234-4_v3000_pm01110-a_g.pdf


    That router is 802.11g (54Mbps) wireless, and 10/100 wired.
    So your 70Mbps when wired is not too far off.

    To take advantage of that 120Mbps speed, you'll need a different router. 10/100/1000.
  2. I don't see anything about it supporting 300Mbit...
    The WAN port on your router will only support up to 100Mbit, each of the switch ports will also only support upto 100Mbit... this is already 20Mbit lower than your WAN link.
    Honestly, your best best is to upgrade your router to one that supports 10/10/1000Mbit on all ports.
    Why you only get 70Mbit, could be many reasons. Issue with the cable from your computer to the router. Could be the router itself not being able to keep up with that much bandwidth. There is always going to be some overhead, so you're never going to hit 120Mbit, realistically you're looking at about 110. But, I would start looking a a router upgrade.
  3. Do you know whether a 300 Mbit router would handle this? I'm not exactly in the budget to spend $150 on a 1Gbps one. I'm looking at under $50 if possible.

    Thank you.
  4. With routers, there is a difference in the WiFi speed vs the wired speed. Pretty much all new routers handle 10/100/1000 wired.
    WiFi capabilities vary.

    Are you looking to be wired or Wireless? If wireless, get one that supports 802.11n or 802.11ac. And with multiple antennas.
  5. USAFRet said:
    With routers, there is a difference in the WiFi speed vs the wired speed. Pretty much all new routers handle 10/100/1000 wired.
    WiFi capabilities vary.

    Are you looking to be wired or Wireless? If wireless, get one that supports 802.11n or 802.11ac. And with multiple antennas.


    My PC's going to be wired all the time. The router is only for the other members of the family, they don't really care about high speed.

    I'm also thinking of getting a super cheap 1Gbps switch. Would that work? Is it worth the hassle, if I can get this router: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=33-704-051&SortField=0&SummaryType=0&Pagesize=10&PurchaseMark=&SelectedRating=-1&VideoOnlyMark=False&VendorMark=&IsFeedbackTab=true&Page=2#scrollFullInfo

    which, according to feedback of other people, handles 120Mbit pretty well.
  6. The one you have listed really isn't any better than then one you have. Look at something like this one:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833156454
    maybe even this one:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833555040
  7. idiotstrike said:
    USAFRet said:
    With routers, there is a difference in the WiFi speed vs the wired speed. Pretty much all new routers handle 10/100/1000 wired.
    WiFi capabilities vary.

    Are you looking to be wired or Wireless? If wireless, get one that supports 802.11n or 802.11ac. And with multiple antennas.


    My PC's going to be wired all the time. The router is only for the other members of the family, they don't really care about high speed.

    I'm also thinking of getting a super cheap 1Gbps switch. Would that work? Is it worth the hassle, if I can get this router: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=33-704-051&SortField=0&SummaryType=0&Pagesize=10&PurchaseMark=&SelectedRating=-1&VideoOnlyMark=False&VendorMark=&IsFeedbackTab=true&Page=2#scrollFullInfo

    which, according to feedback of other people, handles 120Mbit pretty well.


    If you have more than one device, you need a router. The modem only delivers one IP address. That would be to the router. The router then delivers multiple internal IP addresses to all your devices.


    For wired operations, the router you linked still only does 10/100 Mbps. To get your theoretical 120Mbps connection, you need a different one.
    "Ports 1 x 10/100M WAN; 4 x 10/100M LAN"
  8. Alright guys, thanks for your help. I get it now. As for the two routers, unfortunately neither is available in my country.

    I'm thinking of this one: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA1EA0CU0409&Tpk=AirLive%20GW-300R

    It currently costs $50 here, what do you think?
  9. Best answer
    idiotstrike said:
    Alright guys, thanks for your help. I get it now. As for the two routers, unfortunately neither is available in my country.

    I'm thinking of this one: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA1EA0CU0409&Tpk=AirLive%20GW-300R

    It currently costs $50 here, what do you think?


    Never heard of that particular brand, but the specs will do what you need.
    Assuming it works as advertised.
  10. Thank you, I'll pick it up and see. It's getting fairly great reviews.
  11. Thank you, I'll pick it up and see. It's getting fairly great reviews.
  12. Thank you, I'll pick it up and see. It's getting fairly great reviews.
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