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Instruction memory references, Kernel_Data_Inpage_Errors, and overall slowness. Help please!

Last response: in Windows 7
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October 5, 2013 1:20:22 AM

NOTE: This is a repost of an old thread, I am reposting it in the hopes of getting a new response, if an mods are reading this, go ahead and delete the old thread

Hey Guys

I've been getting bsods lately. These have been usually when playing a game and gave the message Kernel_Data_Inpage_Error. I have recently replaced my gpu and my psu, and also recently installed 2 sticks of ddr3 Kingston RAM. I had installed these a few days ago and it was working fine until now, but before I was getting the bsod the first thing I got was "The instruction at 0x####### referenced memory at 0x#######. The memory could not be read. Click ok to terminate the program" At first I thought my bios might have been incompatible with my gpu, seeing how my motherboard is fairly old, so I updated my bios and it seemed to fix that issue, but it was just replaced with the bsod. Any help would be great.

A day later now, I started up the computer, and the explorer.exe "The instruction at 0x referenced memory at 0x000000. The memory could not be read." error came back again after chrome closed and wouldnt open, while an itunes update was installing. So now i'm starting to think that the two are linked in some way. Again, some help would be great.


A week later, been playing around with the ram sticks and still nothing. My computer is so slow I can barely do anything now. Interestingly, it seems to become worse the more often I use the computer, but I may be completely wrong about that. I have also noticed that every 2nd boot or so, Mcafee real-time scanning services have trouble starting up, although I dont know if this is related to my current problem. I am still very much open to the idea that it is not hardware related, as I'm no expert. Still need help badly.

So, while trying to deal with the overall slowness and searching for any help on the internet, bam. "The instruction at 0x referenced memory at 0x. The required data was not placed into memory because of an I/O status of 0xc000000e. Click ok to terminate the program." Shortly after this, even though I hadn't touched it, it shutdown and I was greeted with "Client mac addr: 70 71 BC A4 25 2F GUID: 6B443FAO CBC1 11DF AC23 7071BCA4252F
PXE-E53: No boot file name received.
PXE-MOF: Exiting intel boot agent.
Reboot and select proper boot device" etc etc. At this point I have absolutely no clue what to do.

Thanks
October 5, 2013 2:21:12 AM

Well, hooray! The bsods are back, with the same error message kernel data Inpage error. This time it was followed by a no boot file thing. Still looking for help.

Thanks to anyone who takes the time to help me
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Best solution

October 5, 2013 3:04:09 AM

That's almost certainly a failing hard drive. The inpage error indicates that the OS couldn't read (page in) data from the hard drive (most likely a page from the pagefile or a demand-paged executable).

General slowness is also consistent with this. The hard-drive will keep retrying for some time when it fails to read a sector, so things will take ages to load, if they load at all.

The PXE errors also point at a failing drive - if the BIOS can't read the hard drive when booting up the system (either from power-on or after a reboot/blue screen), it will normally move on to the next boot device on the list, which is often a network adaptor. Unless you have a PXE boot server on your network (normally only corporate networks), you'll get a PXE error like the one you're seeing.

I'd wager that you may also have heard repeated clicking noises (something like ker-lick...ker-lick...ker-lick...) from the PC from time to time - hard drives tend to make them when they're dying as they repeatedly try to re-calibrate the head actuator assembly.

It will get worse with continuing usage of the system, until it won't start up at all.

I'd back up what you can immediately (assuming you can still boot the system) then replace the hard drive as a matter of urgency. (Check whether your current drive is still under warranty using the drive manufacturer's website - many hard drives have at least a 3-year warranty and some have 5 years.)

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news!

Stephen
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October 5, 2013 4:06:17 AM

I have run a chkdsk and it did find a few errors that it fixed, but is there anything else I could do to make sure it's my hard drive before going ahead and buying a new one? (I have not checked my warranty yet, but I have only had the computer for about two years so hopefully it will have not run out). If my warranty has not run out then I guess there wouldn't be any harm in replacing it. However, seeing as how I recently have bought a new gpu and psu, I am a bit iffy about purchasing a new hdd. I have been hearing a few odd sounds from my computer, and those might be it, but, again, I would like to make sure that it is the issue before buying anything.
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October 5, 2013 5:03:48 PM

Can anyone decipher and analyze this information for me? I used a few programs to test the HDD and these are the results (I know very little about HDD's so I have no clue what the errors are):
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October 6, 2013 4:19:30 AM

[Apologies if this appears twice; I've waited several minutes after first posting and it hasn't appeared so I'm trying again with a few corrections.]

Hi,

The reallocated sector count is the number of "spare sectors" that the drive has had to substitute. Hard drives have a certain number of extra sectors beyond their rated capacity which are set aside as spares. When they find a bad sector, they mark it out as "do not use" and, when they get the opportunity (normally when data is written into that sector or if they eventually manage to read the sector after retries and therefore know what should be in it), a spare sector is allocated in its place and the data is written there instead. The drive keeps a list of these reallocated sectors so it knows where to go for the data that should be in them.

Unfortunately, you're probably going to be out of luck on the warranty; the WD10EARS is a Caviar Green series low-power drive, which normally only have 1-year warranties. They're not known for their performance (because of their low rpm and slow seek times) or, indeed, for their reliability, so when you replace the unit, stick to drives like the WD Caviar Blue or Black (which are both 7200rpm drives) or a Seagate 7200rpm drive.

On the plus side, not having the warranty replacement option means that you don't have to find somewhere to back up all the data when you send the drive off until the new drive arrives - you can just transfer your files directly from the old one. I'd avoid trying to copy your Windows installation and applications over, though, even if you have software like TrueImage that can do this as they may well be corrupted - in the long run, you're better off just doing a clean build. You may well be able to revive the old drive by doing a low-level format on it using WD Data Lifeguard (this will wipe the drive completely!) but I'd never trust it for anything too valuable that you can't re-download or otherwise recover from elsewhere.

Stephen
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October 9, 2013 4:27:50 AM

molletts said:

Hi,

Unfortunately, you're probably going to be out of luck on the warranty; the WD10EARS is a Caviar Green series low-power drive, which normally only have 1-year warranties. They're not known for their performance (because of their low rpm and slow seek times) or, indeed, for their reliability, so when you replace the unit, stick to drives like the WD Caviar Blue or Black (which are both 7200rpm drives) or a Seagate 7200rpm drive.

On the plus side, not having the warranty replacement option means that you don't have to find somewhere to back up all the data when you send the drive off until the new drive arrives - you can just transfer your files directly from the old one. I'd avoid trying to copy your Windows installation and applications over, though, even if you have software like TrueImage that can do this as they may well be corrupted - in the long run, you're better off just doing a clean build. You may well be able to revive the old drive by doing a low-level format on it using WD Data Lifeguard (this will wipe the drive completely!) but I'd never trust it for anything too valuable that you can't re-download or otherwise recover from elsewhere.

Stephen


Hi,

I just managed to back up the important stuff on the drive before it carked it, now it's so slow it's unusable, even in safe mode, so there is no way for me to download dat lifeguard (I checked if you could use it as a bootable program, but it doesn't appear you can). Before it became useless I managed to run an error scan with hd tune, and when it had gotten 3 quarters of the way through it froze, however just as it unfroze I managed to get a look at the percent of bad sectors before It blue screened, and it went all the way up to 8.4%, and the scan wasn't even finished yet, so I think it's safe to say the issue is my hdd.
I did check the warranty, and it's a 3 year, so I still have ample time for it. Given the amount of money I have spent upgrading my computer recently, I think it would be best to just go for the warranty right now, and when the new drive reaches the end of its life span I'll upgrade to a better hdd, or perhaps even an ssd if I manage to find the money. Thanks for all your help, I'd probably still be stuck at step one without you.
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December 8, 2013 11:01:41 AM

Hello,

I've been getting the same errors as well. However, I have a question: I have an SSD which I have my OS installed on, and an HDD which has my separate files. How do I know which hard drive is causing me problems? I recently formatted my SSD hoping that that would fix it, but the issue remains. Is there a program I can run? Thanks!
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