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Which GPU Is A better Upgrade For Me?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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October 5, 2013 12:09:21 PM

Which GPU do you think will be a better upgrade? Most common issue I can think of will be HEAT in my current case. Here is a link to TWO GPUS that I am trying to decide between, please help me decide!

1)http://www.microcenter.com/product/418246/GV-N760OC-4GD...

2)http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

^ Which would be a better option to have relatively low/medium heat?
I want my computer to stay fairly cool. I dont want it to over heat.

ALSO :
Would my case have enough space?



These are my current specs :

Specs : (Current Build)

CPU - i7 3770 3.4 ghz
HDD - 1TB
Current PSU - 300 watts
RAM - 32GB
GPU - Nvidia GT640 4GB
CD Drive - Blu ray reader/writer
Case - HP envy 700xt Case
Mobo - Z75 (I think, definetely not a z77)

Other - Mouse, Keyboard, Headphones...

More about : gpu upgrade

October 5, 2013 12:13:00 PM

Dude, you don't need 4GB versions of those cards unless you're sporting three full HD monitors, which your 300W cannot possibly support. I say, stick with the 2GB/3GB stock variants.

Buy a better PSU (SeaSonic) and then buy any GTX 760 card of your choice. They don't differ a lot except in terms of their stock clocks and their coolers. Choose which one looks best to you. For nVidia, I prefer Palit for their looks and Asus for their coolers.
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October 5, 2013 12:15:58 PM

Melderv said:
Dude, you don't need 4GB versions of those cards unless you're sporting three full HD monitors, which your 300W cannot possibly support. I say, stick with the 2GB/3GB stock variants.

Buy a better PSU (SeaSonic) and then buy any GTX 760 card of your choice. They don't differ a lot except in terms of their stock clocks and their coolers. Choose which one looks best to you. For nVidia, I prefer Palit for their looks and Asus for their coolers.


I currently have one monitor, I am planning to get a Dual Monitor setup later but would a 4gb version be future proof or should I just stick with the 2gb?

I also do a lot of graphic design/game development, and that usually requires more VRAM than a gamer. So any new suggestions?
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October 5, 2013 12:20:38 PM

Whoa ther... You really don't need 4gb. on any 760. In my opinion go with a MSI 760 or a Gigabyte 760. You also wouldn't be able to use this with the current PSU you have. If you are on a budget you could go for a Thermaltake TR-2 600 Watt or if you have a bit more money I would take the EVGA 600 Bronze PSU. As for your case you can probably fit that card.

If you have the money I would go for a 770 or 780, but if not that 760 will do anything you want.
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October 5, 2013 12:21:53 PM

BawsAnimations said:
Melderv said:
Dude, you don't need 4GB versions of those cards unless you're sporting three full HD monitors, which your 300W cannot possibly support. I say, stick with the 2GB/3GB stock variants.

Buy a better PSU (SeaSonic) and then buy any GTX 760 card of your choice. They don't differ a lot except in terms of their stock clocks and their coolers. Choose which one looks best to you. For nVidia, I prefer Palit for their looks and Asus for their coolers.


I currently have one monitor, I am planning to get a Dual Monitor setup later but would a 4gb version be future proof or should I just stick with the 2gb?

I also do a lot of graphic design/game development, and that usually requires more VRAM than a gamer. So any new suggestions?

2GB (or 3GB) is plenty enough for modeling. Your already-high CPU RAM (too much maybe) also handles loading the large files from your hard drive so no problem with that.

Remember, games push out (although optimized) plenty of different models and textures all at the same time, and 2GB has always been more than enough for one monitor. And I'm not sure what program you're using, but it also depends on how well they've optimized their GPU acceleration for that program.

3GB is good for 2-3 monitors, and 4GB is good for demanding games with multiple monitors. Any setup can be handled by the GTX 760 or the HD 7970.
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October 5, 2013 1:06:27 PM

If you are mainly just doing game developing and graphic design then a very expensive option will to get a workstation graphics card (Quadro or FirePro). But if you do gaming then those won't be the best, as gaming cards can handle a decent amount of load for the tasks you want to do. For game development and graphic design, you system will primarily use your CPU and your available system RAM. Games are more notorious for using onboard GPU memory at higher resolutions.

That being said, getting 4GB of video memory on a slower graphics card will be bottlenecked by the speed of the core and memory. It's like getting 10GB video memory on a GeForce 620, it won't do you any good. However, the 760 is a pretty good performer and if you're keeping your eyes glued to the 760 then it just comes down to how much money you want to spend. Of course 4GB won't hurt but it may not give you a huge performance advantage.

Other things to consider,
1) You will need a new higher rated PSU
2) Measure your case and the card dimensions
3) Graphics cards with 3 fans compared to 2 are always longer in length.
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