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Finishing up a new CPU/MOBO/RAM build, and have a few questions moving forward.

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October 5, 2013 8:06:48 PM

In my previous thread I found that my MOBO finally died, so I took the time to make a new build and try to keep it under 400. The power supply and GPU are from my previous build and I'll keep them with me for the time being, moving forward.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($109.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus M5A97 LE R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($74.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.95 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Asus Radeon HD 6850 1GB Video Card (Purchased Previously)
Case: Rosewill CHALLENGER ATX Mid Tower Case ($43.30 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Raidmax 730W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply (Purchased Previously)
Total: $373.22
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-10-05 22:59 EDT-0400)

1. I've done the Corsair PSU test (http://www.corsair.com/en/blog/testing-your-corsair-pow...) but the metal sleeves inside the pins look slightly bent now. Is this something to be worried about moving forward? The safety latch also seems a bit wobbly. Will this affect the 24-pin enough to be worried?

2. Although I am buying a new hard drive, I'd also like to be able to get my data off the old one. Would I be able to plug in alongside my new one and not use it as a bootable drive? Could I access the files in Windows Explorer if I install Windows on my new 1TB?

3. Is there any videos as extensive as the Newegg build videos for an AMD motherboard? He did two Intel builds and I just want to be better safe than sorry.

4. Finally, is there any general criticism of the build I picked? Again I'm trying to keep it under $400.

Thanks for your time.

Best solution

a b ) Power supply
a c 158 à CPUs
October 5, 2013 8:25:44 PM

1. I doubt there's an issue with your Power Supply if it worked before. I obviously can't tell from here though.

2. YES. You can get the data off the 2nd drive.
a) Install Windows with only the new drive attached
b) attach the new drive when powered down
c) if you boot into the old OS or can't boot then it go into your BIOS and fix the boot order as it's trying to boot from the old drive.

3. Yes. However you won't need a video. The only exception might be the heatsink though the stock one is simple.

You WILL need to refer to your motherboard manual however for:
a) Memory slots to use when not using all of them
b) Front case and other connections.

Additionally you'll want to get the MAIN CHIPSET driver and other relevent drivers/software direct from the motherboard support site and install that. You can also setup fan control for fans that can connect to the motherboard.

4. I see no big issues, though I hate Mail In Rebates. Such a hassle.
a) I'd recommend a non-stock heatsink (Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO)
b) No mention of WINDOWS. I assume you have a suitable copy but be aware W7 and previous is generally not transferable to a new build.
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October 5, 2013 8:35:51 PM

photonboy said:
1. I doubt there's an issue with your Power Supply if it worked before. I obviously can't tell from here though.

2. YES. You can get the data off the 2nd drive.
a) Install Windows with only the new drive attached
b) attach the new drive when powered down
c) if you boot into the old OS or can't boot then it go into your BIOS and fix the boot order as it's trying to boot from the old drive.

3. Yes. However you won't need a video. The only exception might be the heatsink though the stock one is simple.

You WILL need to refer to your motherboard manual however for:
a) Memory slots to use when not using all of them
b) Front case and other connections.

Additionally you'll want to get the MAIN CHIPSET driver and other relevent drivers/software direct from the motherboard support site and install that. You can also setup fan control for fans that can connect to the motherboard.

4. I see no big issues, though I hate Mail In Rebates. Such a hassle.


1. I did the paperclip trick this morning just to make sure, spun to life just like normal, even though the metal sleeves inside for those two pins were a little bent. 24-pin overall looks to be fine I think. The safety latch wont cause a huge issue I take it? It seems just a bit off but when it was in the motherboard it still felt secure.

2. Alright, glad to hear that. Thank you.

3. Just a little nervous about messing with a different socket than what I'm used to. I'll look up more online: shouldn't have bothered you with something I can google.

Since there is no CD/DVD reader with this build, I can just take the data of the CD to a USB or download the drivers off the motherboard website I take it?

Thank you so much for your time.

photonboy said:
a) I'd recommend a non-stock heatsink (Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO)
b) No mention of WINDOWS. I assume you have a suitable copy but be aware W7 and previous is generally not transferable to a new build.


How important do you think a non-stock is? Is applying the after-market thermal paste difficult?

I have a unused copy of Windows 8, key intact.
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a b ) Power supply
a c 158 à CPUs
October 6, 2013 3:52:00 AM

Stack fans run fairly noisy. The cooling might be adequate if you don't overclock but they are definitely noisy.

There are TUTORIALS on youtube but the basics are:

1) Put the motherboard on a non-conductive surface (anti-static bag) sitting on anything with a little give so you don't damage it.

2) Apply about a pea-sized glob of thermal paste (some coolers have a pre-applied pad not paste) and spread it out.

3) Follow the instructions to screw it in place.

4) Install and setup fan profile software for fan control (slow and quite and ramps up with temperature)
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