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Backing Up a RAID Array

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October 9, 2013 1:12:31 PM

Hi guys,

I have a software RAID 5 array that consists of 4x 2TB internal drives running on a debian machine. I was wondering what the best way to back it up would be, what I've been doing until now is just copying over the data the 3 external 2TB hard drives with rsync. I've been thinking about maybe adding another one and putting them in a RAID 5 array themselves and using that as a backup, on a separate machine maybe? I have had a few ideas, but none of them seem that practical and I was wondering if any of you guys had any suggestions?

Thanks,
Rich.

More about : backing raid array

a c 878 G Storage
October 9, 2013 2:48:47 PM

imo a raid 5 is fine as a hot backup but ideally you also want an offline backup for the truly important data. You know the data that you give anything to get back should a nearby lightning strike take out both you main and your backup arrays. By 'offline' what I mean is one not attached to anything electrical (power, phone, network, usb, esata...) like tapes & Optical disks.
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a b G Storage
October 9, 2013 3:49:16 PM

How about USB3.0/2.0 host with 2x 3TB SPAN (hw mode), and It does not need ANY drivers, or software
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October 10, 2013 2:14:32 AM

popatim said:
imo a raid 5 is fine as a hot backup but ideally you also want an offline backup for the truly important data. You know the data that you give anything to get back should a nearby lightning strike take out both you main and your backup arrays. By 'offline' what I mean is one not attached to anything electrical (power, phone, network, usb, esata...) like tapes & Optical disks.


OK, I could Have the external disks in a raid 5 array that I just assemble when it's time for backup and leave unplugged other than that?
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October 10, 2013 5:23:51 AM

FireWire2 said:
How about USB3.0/2.0 host with 2x 3TB SPAN (hw mode), and It does not need ANY drivers, or software


Isn't span basically raid 0 but on a different architecture? I thought about using raid 0 (raid is easier under linux) but it seems riskier than raid 5?
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a c 378 G Storage
October 10, 2013 7:29:29 AM

RAID 0 is striped with no parity. If one drive in the array dies, you lose all your data. RAID 0 is more for performance and isn't what I consider a true RAID since it offers no redundacy.
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a b G Storage
October 10, 2013 10:45:41 AM

richi3d10 said:
FireWire2 said:
How about USB3.0/2.0 host with 2x 3TB SPAN (hw mode), and It does not need ANY drivers, or software


Isn't span basically raid 0 but on a different architecture? I thought about using raid 0 (raid is easier under linux) but it seems riskier than raid 5?


Yeah, it's sort of. but it is not as dangerous as RAID0 :-)
It's a volume, where all the drives are append together and it is indiscriminate HDD's size, you can use OS's command to create it
It likes a back up with multiple disks, once it fill-out the current one it will go to the next one.

It won't lost entire volume if a drive is gone like RAID0, and you can recover DATA much easier than RAID0
It's also allowing to use ANY HDD: IDE, SATA, BIG. Small... Just a big pool of storage without redundant.

There are other options too:

a) You can can use this stand-alone RAID5
http://www.datoptic.com/ec/esata-usb3-0-hardware-raid-s...
for external solution
b) or DIY HW Raid5 with this little controller:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004JPUZWU. it's independent from OS, drivers...
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October 10, 2013 11:00:23 AM

FireWire2 said:
richi3d10 said:
FireWire2 said:
How about USB3.0/2.0 host with 2x 3TB SPAN (hw mode), and It does not need ANY drivers, or software


Isn't span basically raid 0 but on a different architecture? I thought about using raid 0 (raid is easier under linux) but it seems riskier than raid 5?


Yeah, it's sort of. but it is not as dangerous as RAID0 :-)
It's a volume, where all the drives are append together and it is indiscriminate HDD's size, you can use OS's command to create it
It likes a back up with multiple disks, once it fill-out the current one it will go to the next one.

It won't lost entire volume if a drive is gone like RAID0, and you can recover DATA much easier than RAID0
It's also allowing to use ANY HDD: IDE, SATA, BIG. Small... Just a big pool of storage without redundant.

There are other options too:

a) You can can use this stand-alone RAID5
http://www.datoptic.com/ec/esata-usb3-0-hardware-raid-s...
for external solution
b) or DIY HW Raid5 with this little controller:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004JPUZWU. it's independent from OS, drivers...


Ahh, I see. That's interesting, I might consider doing a spanned volume rather than raid 5 because it frees up some storage for me, plus it's less hassle. Is there a software for linux that you can recommend?
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a b G Storage
October 10, 2013 12:11:37 PM

yes Linux supports that. it should be in LVM
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