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Removing Ubuntu from my Alienware X51

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October 9, 2013 2:48:35 PM

I'll be honest, I hate Linux. Gave it a try for a few days and it's just not for me at all.

So, my brand new Alienware X51 came with Ubuntu on it earlier this week and it makes me sick. I have access to a Windows 7 Install Disk, I am just wondering what I should know before I step into this.

I have tried to reformat before and ran into trouble with installing stock drivers etc. Any known guides for this process would be very helpful! Any tips too, I have the "X51 R2 Resource Disk" that came with my computer.

Also, am I a complete idiot and is there a Windows 7 feature available with my computer?
October 9, 2013 2:53:10 PM

What didn't you like about Ubuntu? (the mac-like interface?)
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the only thing you really *need* to know is that if you install W7, you'll lose everything on the main HDD or SDD.
W7 makes updating drivers super easy, so that shouldn't be a problem.
===
If something goes wrong, you have the factory disk so go for it.
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October 9, 2013 2:53:13 PM

you should use the software in Ubuntu called GParted to get rid of all the partitions on the hard disk (use a live CD for this) then you can install Windows 7 as normal with a CD and creating your own partition structure at install time.
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October 9, 2013 2:55:35 PM

overclockingrocks said:
you should use the software in Ubuntu called GParted to get rid of all the partitions on the hard disk (use a live CD for this) then you can install Windows 7 as normal with a CD and creating your own partition structure at install time.


Doesn't W7 give you that option when you install it?
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October 9, 2013 8:33:19 PM

Archean_0 said:
What didn't you like about Ubuntu? (the mac-like interface?)
===
the only thing you really *need* to know is that if you install W7, you'll lose everything on the main HDD or SDD.
W7 makes updating drivers super easy, so that shouldn't be a problem.
===
If something goes wrong, you have the factory disk so go for it.


The main reason would be I am using my PC strictly for games, and 90% of my bought games through Steam are not compatible. I understand there are ways to run Windows games through Linux but hear they aren't so great; not to mention Origin is supposedly unplayable on Linux and I am really looking forward to BF4
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October 10, 2013 1:45:49 AM

DevDep said:
Archean_0 said:
What didn't you like about Ubuntu? (the mac-like interface?)
===
the only thing you really *need* to know is that if you install W7, you'll lose everything on the main HDD or SDD.
W7 makes updating drivers super easy, so that shouldn't be a problem.
===
If something goes wrong, you have the factory disk so go for it.


The main reason would be I am using my PC strictly for games, and 90% of my bought games through Steam are not compatible. I understand there are ways to run Windows games through Linux but hear they aren't so great; not to mention Origin is supposedly unplayable on Linux and I am really looking forward to BF4


Use gparted (download from the Ubuntu software center, that's a program. Shrink the Ubuntu volume as much as you want. You will now have a place to install windows and still keep your Ubuntu to play with when you feel like it. Windows will erase the Ubuntu launcher but it can be restored. If steam is your thing do bear in mind that steam is porting a lot to Linux and you may want to keep it around.
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Best solution

October 10, 2013 5:10:26 PM

stillblue said:
DevDep said:
Archean_0 said:
What didn't you like about Ubuntu? (the mac-like interface?)
===
the only thing you really *need* to know is that if you install W7, you'll lose everything on the main HDD or SDD.
W7 makes updating drivers super easy, so that shouldn't be a problem.
===
If something goes wrong, you have the factory disk so go for it.


The main reason would be I am using my PC strictly for games, and 90% of my bought games through Steam are not compatible. I understand there are ways to run Windows games through Linux but hear they aren't so great; not to mention Origin is supposedly unplayable on Linux and I am really looking forward to BF4


Use gparted (download from the Ubuntu software center, that's a program. Shrink the Ubuntu volume as much as you want. You will now have a place to install windows and still keep your Ubuntu to play with when you feel like it. Windows will erase the Ubuntu launcher but it can be restored. If steam is your thing do bear in mind that steam is porting a lot to Linux and you may want to keep it around.


alternatively, you can wipe the HDD and do a fresh install-->steam it up : )
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