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Integrated Graphics. Need Help.

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  • Graphics
  • Graphics Cards
  • Temperature
Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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October 14, 2013 2:48:42 PM

Hi, my integrated graphics temp is 55C while PC is idling and while I have opened the cover of my PC and put a fan on maximum to cool it (still 55C). The integrated graphics is causing my PC blue screens and freezing. Without the cooling, the temperature reaches 70C. MY QUESTION: Why was my PC freezing and getting blue screens when I was using a dedicated graphics card (6770)? I wasn't using the integrated graphics so how would it reach such temps?

Also, due to a bad intergrated graphics card, does this mean I need a new motherboard?

More about : integrated graphics

a b U Graphics card
October 14, 2013 2:56:38 PM

At stock clock, most of AMD's CPUs work fine up to about 90C and Intel's up to 105C core temperature so 70C should still be nowhere near hot enough to cause problems. You might want to verify that the HSF is properly attached if you reach 70C at idle.
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October 14, 2013 3:02:07 PM

InvalidError said:
At stock clock, most of AMD's CPUs work fine up to about 90C and Intel's up to 105C core temperature so 70C should still be nowhere near hot enough to cause problems. You might want to verify that the HSF is properly attached if you reach 70C at idle.

I'm talking about my integrated graphics card, my CPU is fine, my CPU is 28C at idle. I have a problem with the integrated graphics card.
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a c 123 U Graphics card
October 14, 2013 3:43:36 PM

explain all hardware/monitor res/and what you are doing when it freezes..........

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October 14, 2013 4:37:19 PM

I use "Speccy" to monitor temp. of the hardware, and the integrated graphic card read 55C, it only starts freezing up when I play games. I could surf the web, watch Youtube and get no freezing. Temp. goes up to 65C when gaming. SPECS: CPU: AMD Athlon II X4 630 Propus, Motherboard: Pegatron Corporations Violet6 M2N78-LA (Owned by ASUS), PSU: BFG 450watts, no dedicated graphic card. 21 inch monitor with 1920x1080@60Hz.

UPDATE: TEMP WENT TO 75C ON IDLE. Do I need a new Mobo to fix the integrated graphics card issue? I have an AMD Processor.
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a c 123 U Graphics card
October 14, 2013 5:11:03 PM

when's the last time you upgraded the motherboard drivers or the on board video driver?

have you been to windows update lately?

see the heat sink on the board? can you place direct airflow on that?

when you removed the discreet graphics card ( 6670 ) did you uninstall the drivers that installed with it?
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October 14, 2013 5:46:23 PM

I'm not sure the last time I upgraded motherboard drivers, but I upgraded the on-board drivers today. And no, I haven't been to windows update lately. Also, I did not uninstall the drivers that I installed with my 6770. Thanks for replying, much appreciated.
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a b U Graphics card
October 14, 2013 6:17:50 PM

timmv said:
UPDATE: TEMP WENT TO 75C ON IDLE. Do I need a new Mobo to fix the integrated graphics card issue? I have an AMD Processor.

Which AMD CPU exactly? On FM1/FM2 AMD socket "APUs", the "integrated graphics card" is not a card at all; it is integrated directly in the CPU itself. Same goes for Core iX on Intel's side.
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October 14, 2013 6:37:13 PM

InvalidError said:
timmv said:
UPDATE: TEMP WENT TO 75C ON IDLE. Do I need a new Mobo to fix the integrated graphics card issue? I have an AMD Processor.

Which AMD CPU exactly? On FM1/FM2 AMD socket "APUs", the "integrated graphics card" is not a card at all; it is integrated directly in the CPU itself. Same goes for Core iX on Intel's side.


I have an AM3 Socket CPU (AMD Athlon II X4 630 Propus), as my motherboard only supports AM3 socket type CPU's. I heard that only Intel boards don't have on-board graphics but their CPU's do. AND I heard that only AMD boards come with on-board graphics not their CPU's. Also, I know iGPU (integrated graphics) are not cards, sorry for the misunderstanding.

PLEASE ANSWER: Will getting a new motherboard solve this? The software I use (Speccy) shows my CPU 28C while my integrated graphics reads 65C+. Since you say the integrated graphics are IN the CPU ITSELF, won't they both read same temp?

NOTE: I could be wrong and you have my apologies. I'm a noobie with these types of situations, just trying to solve my integrated graphics over-heating issue that's causing my PC to run like crap.
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a b U Graphics card
October 15, 2013 12:39:37 AM

timmv said:
PLEASE ANSWER: Will getting a new motherboard solve this? The software I use (Speccy) shows my CPU 28C while my integrated graphics reads 65C+. Since you say the integrated graphics are IN the CPU ITSELF, won't they both read same temp?

The CPU-integrated GPU is for sockets FM1/FM2.

Since you have an AM3 motherboard based on the GeForce 8200 chipset, your IGP is integrated into the motherboard chipset - the chip under the square fanless aluminum heatsink at the bottom-right corner of your PCB.

This chip runs your SATA ports, USB ports, PCIe slots and a handful of other things so it would run somewhat hot regardless of whether or not you used the IGP it provides since it handles all communications between the CPU and peripherals.
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October 15, 2013 12:03:57 PM

Oh, thanks for the reply. So everything is fine with the Integrated Graphics, name of my iGPU is Nvidia Geforce 9100. Heard it's a crappy iGPU and since was discontinued due to overheating. My issue is a very tough issue to solve (at least for me). Now I'm starting to think that the FREEZING and BLUE SCREENS are due to a software corruption and I might be in need of re-installing Windows 7.

EDIT: I have actually remember re-installing Windows 7 and the Freezing/ BSOD not going away.

Guys much appreciated with the info and help. Please stay with me and help me resolve this 10 month issue.
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a c 123 U Graphics card
October 15, 2013 12:37:36 PM

so, did you do anything I suggested above? or do you just want to complain because it makes you feel good?
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October 15, 2013 12:51:38 PM

I've put direct airflow on it and am doing the windows updates right now. But if you've read my recent posts, I've been told my iGPU temp is fine and not a result of causing freezing/blue screens.
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a c 123 U Graphics card
October 15, 2013 1:20:58 PM

don't believe everything you read. that SB chip gets hotter than the sun.......... I think someone above stated the relative importance of that chip and the information that passes through it. to think it doesn't get TOO hot isn't sane thinking.
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October 15, 2013 2:24:55 PM

@Swiftly Morgan: I've done everything suggested above you mentioned except one thing. Why do I need to uninstall GPU drivers
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Best solution

a c 365 U Graphics card
October 15, 2013 3:07:16 PM

I am going to guess that the thermal paste on the heatsink covering your integrated nVidia GeForce 9100 graphics core has gone bad. It probably has turned to powder an is no longer conducting heat to the heatsink. If that is the case, then you need to clean the old thermal paste off the heatsink and the chipset itself then apply new thermal paste which you need to buy. I generally recommend Arctic Silver 5 it's been around for a while so you may be able to a tube at your local computer store. Maybe RadioShack sell them.

Below is a picture of the motherboard. The GeForce 9100 chipset should be underneath that silver rectangular heatsink you see in the lower mid-right corner.

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October 15, 2013 3:28:15 PM

Okay, I tried it, you were right, I could even barely get the old thermal paste off. Is it bad if I used a blade and scratched the heatsink to get the thermal paste off? I didn't use Arctic Silver 5, but some regular thermal paste. My temps down to 49C! If I use Arctic Silver 5, would temps be even lower? Thanks for the great advice!

NOTE: I'm going back and forth whether if the integrated graphics are causing the freezing/BSoD. I noticed everytime iGPU temps reach 65C it starts to freeze up. But since it's down to 49-55C haven't froze once.
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a c 123 U Graphics card
October 15, 2013 3:49:11 PM

guess you're heading in the right direction.......... forget the AC5. something I never liked using on the motherboard.......... think I shorted a couple while using that.
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a c 365 U Graphics card
October 15, 2013 4:06:39 PM

Use a damp lint free cloth to slowly but surely wipe of the dried thermal paste from the motherboard and the heatsink.

Let the heatsink and especially the motherboard dry out for a while before applying new thermal paste and turning on the PC.
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a b U Graphics card
October 15, 2013 4:21:17 PM

jaguarskx said:
I am going to guess that the thermal paste on the heatsink covering your integrated nVidia GeForce 9100 graphics core has gone bad. It probably has turned to powder an is no longer conducting heat to the heatsink.

The main active ingredient in nearly all thermal pastes is metal oxide powder. The oil/grease in most pastes is there simply as a "transport medium" to make those microscopic particles easier to work with and prevent them from becoming potentially hazardous aerosols.

The problem is not the "drying" itself but how particles settle, causing voids and concentrations of filler materials to form over time. The only way to avoid that is to use pastes with low oil/grease content so particles cannot drift through it but those require hydraulic presses to apply so you only see them pre-applied to heatsinks and need to be careful not to scratch them during HSF installation for optimum results.

A problem common to all fully settled pastes is that mechanical stresses can break the "bond" that forms as particles settle (ever noticed how prying a HSF off a CPU requires a lot more force after a few months?) and when that happens, air gets sucked in to fill all the voids this forms. Old dry TIM that settled fairly evenly may work perfectly fine until the day you bump the heatsink and crack the paste.
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a c 365 U Graphics card
October 15, 2013 4:31:36 PM

I used the phrase "turned to powder" simply to indicate that the thermal paste is no longer working as it should. Sometimes simple terminologies are good just to get the point across. It's better than stating that the active agents are no longer suspended in the emulsifying agent, thus destroying the thermal conductive properties of the thermal paste. Good for someone who understands. Bad if the general reaction is:

"WTF are you talking about?"
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October 15, 2013 6:30:10 PM

Hopefully one last question you guys could answer for me: Is THIS motherboard compatible with my system?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

My system specs: 3 sticks of 2GB RAM (1600), CPU: AMD Athlon II X4 630 Propus, PSU:450W (Not sure what company)
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a b U Graphics card
October 15, 2013 7:26:50 PM

jaguarskx said:
It's better than stating that the active agents are no longer suspended in the emulsifying agent, thus destroying the thermal conductive properties of the thermal paste.

The "emulsifying agent" in most pastes has much lower thermal conductivity than its oxide particles so no longer being suspended in it is actually good when it occurs the right way: packed uniformly densely without voids or filler pockets. You want the "active" ingredients' particles in physical contact with each other as much as possible and only have oil/grease filling gaps too small for other particles to fit in between particles. That's where the hydraulic presses come in to crush all the particles together, which yields the clay-like "dry" TIMs we see pre-applied on some HSFs.
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