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Should I install a second OS on a separate hard drive?

I built a pc and installed Windows 7 to a 60GB SSD and use a 1TB HDD to store the majority of my applications and files (whatever doesn't need to be on the main drive). I recently started going to school for audio production and we have to use Pro Tools, which must be installed on the drive that the OS is installed on; all of the project files need to be stored on the main drive too. With updates to Windows and some other programs that designate themselves on the main drive, the space remaining on the SSD is a little over 2GB. i was wondering if it would be possible/advisable to buy another HDD and install its own OS on it for Pro Tools, while keeping my current drives untouched. thank you for any feedback!

specs:

mobo: GA-F2A85X-UP4
cpu: amd a10 5800k
RAM: Patriot Memory Viper 3 Series Venom Red DDR3 8GB 1866MHz
PSU: Cooler Master GX - 750W 80 PLUS Bronze
OS: Windows 7 ultimate 64 bit, SP 1
9 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about install separate hard drive
  1. Yep. and then you can just boot to that Hdd when you need to. I did that and had Vista on one and Windows 7 on the other one. :P
  2. Best answer
    There is no need to install another OS on the other drive in an attempt of keeping te SSD from filling up. In fact, that is wildly counter productive.

    See this shamelessly self promoting tutorial for keeping things 'elsewhere:
    http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-1834397/ssd-redirecting-static-files.html
  3. cool, thanks! guess i'll start trying to figure out how to do it now
  4. USAFRet said:
    There is no need to install another OS on the other drive in an attempt of keeping te SSD from filling up. In fact, that is wildly counter productive.

    See this shamelessly self promoting tutorial for keeping things 'elsewhere:
    http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-1834397/ssd-redirecting-static-files.html


    i've already done what this article is suggesting. my libraries and the majority of my applications are all moved over to my TB HDD, but pro tools is taking up a lot of space and will only continue to do so as i acquire plug ins, work on more projects etc. i doubt that clearing space on the SSD will be a long term solution if Pro Tools will be involved...
  5. whitegarden said:
    USAFRet said:
    There is no need to install another OS on the other drive in an attempt of keeping te SSD from filling up. In fact, that is wildly counter productive.

    See this shamelessly self promoting tutorial for keeping things 'elsewhere:
    http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-1834397/ssd-redirecting-static-files.html


    i've already done what this article is suggesting. my libraries and the majority of my applications are all moved over to my TB HDD, but pro tools is taking up a lot of space and will only continue to do so as i acquire plug ins, work on more projects etc. i doubt that clearing space on the SSD will be a long term solution if Pro Tools will be involved...



    Then a larger SSD would be in order. I find a 60GB just on the edge of usable.
    Even less if you have large applications, with a lot of plugins.

    Can you cause ProTools to use another disk as save space?
  6. Also, can you designate an alternate location for the plugins? Most good image editing tools can do this.
    Not sure about ProTools, though.
  7. USAFRet said:
    whitegarden said:
    USAFRet said:
    There is no need to install another OS on the other drive in an attempt of keeping te SSD from filling up. In fact, that is wildly counter productive.

    See this shamelessly self promoting tutorial for keeping things 'elsewhere:
    http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-1834397/ssd-redirecting-static-files.html


    i've already done what this article is suggesting. my libraries and the majority of my applications are all moved over to my TB HDD, but pro tools is taking up a lot of space and will only continue to do so as i acquire plug ins, work on more projects etc. i doubt that clearing space on the SSD will be a long term solution if Pro Tools will be involved...



    Then a larger SSD would be in order. I find a 60GB just on the edge of usable.
    Even less if you have large applications, with a lot of plugins.

    Can you cause ProTools to use another disk as save space?


    no, errors occur when everything isn't all on the same, main drive. my logic so far is that, instead of wiping my computer and re-installing everything on an expensive 120GB SSD, and then trying to fit pro tools into the mix, i could buy a 500GB HDD, which is more than enough space to work on my music for the entire time i'm at school. the only thing that worries me is what you implied about the 60gb still not being enough for everything else, though i'm sure once pro tools is gone and i do some more specific file cleaning it should be ok...any thoughts?
  8. Usually, they will install a 60 Gb SSD for the OS, and then every thing else will go on a Hdd. Might also keep a couple of things that are regularly used.
  9. whitegarden said:


    no, errors occur when everything isn't all on the same, main drive. my logic so far is that, instead of wiping my computer and re-installing everything on an expensive 120GB SSD, and then trying to fit pro tools into the mix, i could buy a 500GB HDD, which is more than enough space to work on my music for the entire time i'm at school. the only thing that worries me is what you implied about the 60gb still not being enough for everything else, though i'm sure once pro tools is gone and i do some more specific file cleaning it should be ok...any thoughts?



    For me, a 60GB drive would not be enough. I have the OS and all applications (mainly image manipulation) installed on it, with currently ~50GB used. I'd be sweating that extra space.
    And if your drive has only 2GB free...that is killing the drive. An SSD really needs 10-15% free minimum.

    Any games reside elsewhere.

    But 128GB drives are not that expensive right now. $80-$90. I realize that may be a lot for someone in school, though.
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