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Rookies need help

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  • Motherboards
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October 16, 2013 9:19:00 PM

My son and I are attempting our first build. And he's asking for multiple monitors, should we look at certain specs on the motherboard or something else? Our budget is $1500.Any help would be
appreciated.

More about : rookies

a b V Motherboard
October 16, 2013 9:26:22 PM

Most video cards support two monitors and some three monitors.

A phone call or live chat to the manufacturer is a way to be sure.

How many monitors, is multiple monitors?
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October 16, 2013 9:30:15 PM

spyder13 said:
My son and I are attempting our first build. And he's asking for multiple monitors, should we look at certain specs on the motherboard or something else? Our budget is $1500.Any help would be
appreciated.


bkoop said:
Most video cards support two monitors and some three monitors.

A phone call or live chat to the manufacturer is a way to be sure.


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Related resources
a b C Monitor
a b V Motherboard
October 16, 2013 9:31:38 PM

spyder13 said:
My son and I are attempting our first build. And he's asking for multiple monitors, should we look at certain specs on the motherboard or something else? Our budget is $1500.Any help would be
appreciated.


Considering the budget, it's probably ok to assume that this will be a gaming PC, right?

Well multi-monitors is fine. It has nothing to do with your motherboard, and more to do with your graphics card. Most graphics cards nowadays have 1 HDMI input, and 2 DVI inputs. To create a multi-monitor setup, you just plug the respective cable into each, and use either Windows or your graphics card control panel to determine what orientation each monitor will be in.

However, when he says multi-monitor do you mean:
A.) 1 monitor to game on and 1-2 monitors for multi-tasking?
-or-
B.) 3 monitors to render a part of the game's image on at once for a huge aspect ratio?

In the case of A, there's no problems and it's a good decision if you like gaming while having Facebook open and you dislike alt-tabbing.

In the case of B, you won't have the performance for it (most likely). Assuming that the $1,500 is being used to buy the monitors as well, if you get a good deal and buy 3-1080p monitors for $150 each that'll leave you with $1,050 on which to buy the actual components for the rig (and any other peripherals). 3 monitors means a resolution 3 times as big for a game. That's 5760x1080 which even a GTX Titan struggles with good frames on. So in other words, B is not exactly the most feasible of options.

A, on the other hand, is perfect considering your budget.

UPDATE: On second thought, if you're willing to go for an SLI setup (as opposed to a CrossFire setup which has microstuttering, so I'd advise against that) then a 2-way GTX 760 might be a good answer, but that's $500 right there. That still leaves $550 for the other parts, which honestly is still a good budget if it's to buy all the parts except for a GPU, but just make sure your motherboard is SLI compatible first.
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October 16, 2013 9:41:15 PM

Deus Gladiorum said:
spyder13 said:
My son and I are attempting our first build. And he's asking for multiple monitors, should we look at certain specs on the motherboard or something else? Our budget is $1500.Any help would be
appreciated.


Considering the budget, it's probably ok to assume that this will be a gaming PC, right?

Well multi-monitors is fine. It has nothing to do with your motherboard, and more to do with your graphics card. Most graphics cards nowadays have 1 HDMI input, and 2 DVI inputs. To create a multi-monitor setup, you just plug the respective cable into each, and use either Windows or your graphics card control panel to determine what orientation each monitor will be in.

However, when he says multi-monitor do you mean:
A.) 1 monitor to game on and 1-2 monitors for multi-tasking?
-or-
B.) 3 monitors to render a part of the game's image on at once for a huge aspect ratio?

In the case of A, there's no problems and it's a good decision if you like gaming while having Facebook open and you dislike alt-tabbing.

In the case of B, you won't have the performance for it (most likely). Assuming that the $1,500 is being used to buy the monitors as well, if you get a good deal and buy 3-1080p monitors for $150 each that'll leave you with $1,050 on which to buy the actual components for the rig (and any other peripherals). 3 monitors means a resolution 3 times as big for a game. That's 5760x1080 which even a GTX Titan struggles with good frames on. So in other words, B is not exactly the most feasible of options.

A, on the other hand, is perfect considering your budget.

UPDATE: On second thought, if you're willing to go for an SLI setup (as opposed to a CrossFire setup which has microstuttering, so I'd advise against that) then a 2-way GTX 760 might be a good answer, but that's $500 right there. That still leaves $550 for the other parts, which honestly is still a good budget if it's to buy all the parts except for a GPU, but just make sure your motherboard is SLI compatible first.


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a b C Monitor
a b V Motherboard
October 16, 2013 9:42:49 PM

Just to warn you, in case you're not aware of it, you're not actually replying you've just quoted and left no input of your own. I only mention it because you've done it twice now, so, you know...
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October 16, 2013 9:51:09 PM

Wow so much to think about, it's quite obvious this won't be as easy as I thought. Thank you for all your input. And just a FYI the
monitors aren't included in our budget, their separate
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October 16, 2013 9:53:45 PM

Deus Gladiorum said:
Just to warn you, in case you're not aware of it, you're not actually replying you've just quoted and left no input of your own. I only mention it because you've done it twice now, so, you know...


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October 16, 2013 9:55:15 PM

Thanks like it says "Rookie"
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Best solution

a b C Monitor
a b V Motherboard
October 16, 2013 10:39:03 PM

spyder13 said:
Wow so much to think about, it's quite obvious this won't be as easy as I thought. Thank you for all your input. And just a FYI the
monitors aren't included in our budget, their separate


Oh they aren't? Then 3-way that monitor setup and get 2 GTX 770's and put those pups in SLI! A GTX 770 is $400 a pop (actually more because I recommend you increase VRAM to support multi-monitor), but having $700 left to build the rest of your system with is still more than enough. I actually recommend that you start out with only a single GTX 770 and an awesome build for around $1,200 - $1,300, give or take. After a few months, the GTX 770 will have dropped in price to compensate for AMD's competing GPU, the R9 280X, which is similar performance for $100 less. The only reason I'm not suggesting that one is because CrossFire, as I've stated, has too many issues. Anyway, by the time the GTX 770 drops in price, your extra PC funds will have (probably) accrued back over the affordable range for a second, 4 GB GTX 770 and you'll be immediately ready to install it without any issues and have your multi-GPU setup rocking games out at 5760x1080.

If I may, I'd like to suggest to you this build:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($239.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87X-D3H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($134.98 @ Outlet PC)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($84.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Kingston HyperX 3K 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 4GB Video Card ($439.99 @ Amazon)
Case: NZXT Phantom (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: SeaSonic M12II 850W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($16.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($87.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1346.88
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-10-17 01:32 EDT-0400)

Before mail-in rebates it's actually $1,397. After mail-in rebates, it's $1,346. Still pricey, but this thing is fantastic. For 1920x1080 gaming, and even some games at 5760x1080, this thing will get 60 fps easily. If and when you do decide you want to get a 2nd GPU, you must get one of the same VRAM and model as the current model, i.e. 4 GB GTX 770. It doesn't have to be from the same manufacturer, but it's just a simpler process if you do get it from the same manufacturer due to slight differences between versions.

Anyway, let's go over some of the features of this build for things you may not know about:

- 1 TB HDD. It's large, and can easily be expanded via a second, inexpensive 1 TB HDD later on or by some other means of storage if you run out of space. You can put all your games, files, what have you on here and you'll be good to go.

- 128 GB SSD. SSD's (Solid State Drives) are the means of storage which will one day completely replace HDDs. SSDs are far faster than HDDs (HDD's barely even hit around 1/30th of an SSD's speed), but the problem right now is that they're not affordable, with prices reaching nearly $1 per GB. However, by having both an SSD and an HDD, you can install Windows, an Anti-Virus, and any other startup programs on your SSD for amazing bootup times, and then use your HDD as a giant secondary storage for all your games and such. You'll have some good space leftover in the SSD after all your startup programs are installed, so you can use the extra space for any other programs you might need or for games which might have exceedingly long loading times.
Share
October 17, 2013 3:52:45 AM

Deus Gladiorum said:
spyder13 said:
Wow so much to think about, it's quite obvious this won't be as easy as I thought. Thank you for all your input. And just a FYI the
monitors aren't included in our budget, their separate


Oh they aren't? Then 3-way that monitor setup and get 2 GTX 770's and put those pups in SLI! A GTX 770 is $400 a pop (actually more because I recommend you increase VRAM to support multi-monitor), but having $700 left to build the rest of your system with is still more than enough. I actually recommend that you start out with only a single GTX 770 and an awesome build for around $1,200 - $1,300, give or take. After a few months, the GTX 770 will have dropped in price to compensate for AMD's competing GPU, the R9 280X, which is similar performance for $100 less. The only reason I'm not suggesting that one is because CrossFire, as I've stated, has too many issues. Anyway, by the time the GTX 770 drops in price, your extra PC funds will have (probably) accrued back over the affordable range for a second, 4 GB GTX 770 and you'll be immediately ready to install it without any issues and have your multi-GPU setup rocking games out at 5760x1080.

If I may, I'd like to suggest to you this build:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($239.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87X-D3H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($134.98 @ Outlet PC)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($84.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Kingston HyperX 3K 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 4GB Video Card ($439.99 @ Amazon)
Case: NZXT Phantom (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: SeaSonic M12II 850W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($16.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($87.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1346.88
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-10-17 01:32 EDT-0400)

Before mail-in rebates it's actually $1,397. After mail-in rebates, it's $1,346. Still pricey, but this thing is fantastic. For 1920x1080 gaming, and even some games at 5760x1080, this thing will get 60 fps easily. If and when you do decide you want to get a 2nd GPU, you must get one of the same VRAM and model as the current model, i.e. 4 GB GTX 770. It doesn't have to be from the same manufacturer, but it's just a simpler process if you do get it from the same manufacturer due to slight differences between versions.

Anyway, let's go over some of the features of this build for things you may not know about:

- 1 TB HDD. It's large, and can easily be expanded via a second, inexpensive 1 TB HDD later on or by some other means of storage if you run out of space. You can put all your games, files, what have you on here and you'll be good to go.

- 128 GB SSD. SSD's (Solid State Drives) are the means of storage which will one day completely replace HDDs. SSDs are far faster than HDDs (HDD's barely even hit around 1/30th of an SSD's speed), but the problem right now is that they're not affordable, with prices reaching nearly $1 per GB. However, by having both an SSD and an HDD, you can install Windows, an Anti-Virus, and any other startup programs on your SSD for amazing bootup times, and then use your HDD as a giant secondary storage for all your games and such. You'll have some good space leftover in the SSD after all your startup programs are installed, so you can use the extra space for any other programs you might need or for games which might have exceedingly long loading times.


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October 17, 2013 4:16:47 AM

This is just wonderful, and so much appreciated.You've gone far beyond what we expected here.this will make
our project a lot easier. Thanks to both of you for your input. The Rookies
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a b C Monitor
a b V Motherboard
October 17, 2013 6:49:31 AM

spyder13 said:
This is just wonderful, and so much appreciated.You've gone far beyond what we expected here.this will make
our project a lot easier. Thanks to both of you for your input. The Rookies


No problem, and don't forget to choose a best answer :) 
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October 21, 2013 12:19:32 PM

Deus Gladiorum said:
spyder13 said:
This is just wonderful, and so much appreciated.You've gone far beyond what we expected here.this will make
our project a lot easier. Thanks to both of you for your input. The Rookies


No problem, and don't forget to choose a best answer :) 


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October 21, 2013 12:28:28 PM

DG sorry for so many questions but I've found this at tigerdirect EVGA GeForce GTX 760 Video Card - 4GB GDDR5, PCI-Express 3.0 (x16), 1x Dual-Link DVI-D, 1x Dual-Link DVI-I, 1x DisplayPort, 1x HDMI, DirectX 11.1, SLI, Dual-Slot, ACX Cooler, (04G-P4-2768-KR)
it seems to have the same specs as the GTX 770 you mentioned. with a saving of around $100 which is not a problem it could be used
in some other way thanks for your input The Rookies
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a b V Motherboard
October 21, 2013 10:08:12 PM

The GTX 760 is most always $100 cheaper than the GTX 770. The GTX 770 is the faster card and given the multiple monitors, that is why the suggestion for the GTX 770.

The major difference between the two cards:
GTX 770 1536 CUDA cores
GTX 760 1152 CUDA cores

How many monitors, is multiple monitors?
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!