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650 TI Boost Overclocking

Tags:
  • Overclocking
  • Desktops
  • Boost
Last response: in Overclocking
October 17, 2013 8:26:37 PM

I am very new too overclocking, as I have just built my first desktop.

I have already overclocked my processor to 4.5 ghz but I cannot figure out how to overclock my 650 TI boost 2gb's running in sli. There doesnt seem to be any appropriate guides for these cards

From my understanding all I have to do is turn up the gpu clock offset on evga precision, but whenever I do that the games I load crashes and my computer tends to freeze up. Even if I only up the mhz by 100 or so.

So basically I am asking how to use this program to correctly overclock both of my graphics cards.

Thanks

evga precision
http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/27/mddy.jpg/

speccy
http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/842/tqv7.jpg/


More about : 650 boost overclocking

a b K Overclocking
October 17, 2013 9:01:52 PM

The basic steps for overclocking a GPU is:

Increase your core clock offsets until you are hitting thermal limits or you see instability under load. Once you hit your thermal limit (I wouldn't take cards much past 80C and absolute thermal limit for most cards is 100-110C) you're basically done unless you want to upgrade your cooling solution. If you don't and you start seeing instability, then it's time to increase your voltage.

Increasing voltage will allow you to stabilize higher clock speeds. However keep in mind any excess voltage poses a risk of damaging your card or reducing its lifespan. The higher you raise the voltage, the higher those risks become. It's up to you to decide when risk outweighs benefit.

It's best to increase voltage in the smallest increments possible, testing each time you increase for stability and temperature (you will see a much larger increase in temperature with increasing voltage than you ever will with just increasing clock speeds). If it's stable, go back to inching up your clock offsets until you see stability/thermal issues.

Keep repeating these steps until you find a stable OC at a voltage and temperature you are comfortable with. Remember to always test the card under load - this is the only way to see if you have a truly stable OC and if your card is going to overheat.
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