Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Can the GTX 760 4GB FTW ACX cooler be overclocked more?

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
October 18, 2013 5:10:54 PM

Hi, I wanted to know, can the GTX 760 4gb FTW be overclocked anymore? If so please tell me how to (or just put a guide) and by how much it can be overclocked! Thanks!

Best solution

a b K Overclocking
October 18, 2013 5:31:20 PM

Yes, it can be overclocked.

Use EVGA Precision X.

First up your power target to maximum. Then start to increase your core offsets in small increments (I would start with 50 MHz increments) and with each increase test the settings under load (either start up a game or use a benchmarking tool like Heaven). Keep increasing the offset as long as everything is stable (no crashes or freezes). Also keep an eye on your temperatures, making sure they don't hit 80C, otherwise your card will throttle the clock, effectively ruining the purpose of the overclock.

Once you see instability, then you have to decide whether to stop there or keep going. If you want to keep going, you will need to start adjusting voltages. Now fair warning: any increase in voltage poses a risk of damaging your card or shortening its lifespan. It's up to you to decide if you want to take that risk.

If you decide to keep going, then use Precision to bump up the voltage offset by the minimum possible amount. Then re-test for stability and pay extra attention to temperature. Any time you increase voltage you will see your card putting out a lot more heat than if you just increase clock offset. If everything is stable and not too hot, then you can continue inching that clock offset higher and just repeat what you've been doing.

Once you reach a good core clock, then you can repeat the process with the memory clock. Keep in mind that games tend to be more finicky about the memory clock than they are with the core clock. Some games won't tolerate very high memory clocks and you'll see it when you're playing as artifacts on your screen. If you start seeing artifacts, then you should dial back the memory clock.

One final note: you can set up a software fan curve with Precision as well. This lets you control how fast your GPU fan(s) spin at every temperature level. If your card is getting too hot you may be able to adjust the fan curve for extra cooling.
Share
October 18, 2013 5:52:10 PM

aznricepuff said:
Yes, it can be overclocked.

Use EVGA Precision X.

First up your power target to maximum. Then start to increase your core offsets in small increments (I would start with 50 MHz increments) and with each increase test the settings under load (either start up a game or use a benchmarking tool like Heaven). Keep increasing the offset as long as everything is stable (no crashes or freezes). Also keep an eye on your temperatures, making sure they don't hit 80C, otherwise your card will throttle the clock, effectively ruining the purpose of the overclock.

Once you see instability, then you have to decide whether to stop there or keep going. If you want to keep going, you will need to start adjusting voltages. Now fair warning: any increase in voltage poses a risk of damaging your card or shortening its lifespan. It's up to you to decide if you want to take that risk.

If you decide to keep going, then use Precision to bump up the voltage offset by the minimum possible amount. Then re-test for stability and pay extra attention to temperature. Any time you increase voltage you will see your card putting out a lot more heat than if you just increase clock offset. If everything is stable and not too hot, then you can continue inching that clock offset higher and just repeat what you've been doing.

Once you reach a good core clock, then you can repeat the process with the memory clock. Keep in mind that games tend to be more finicky about the memory clock than they are with the core clock. Some games won't tolerate very high memory clocks and you'll see it when you're playing as artifacts on your screen. If you start seeing artifacts, then you should dial back the memory clock.

One final note: you can set up a software fan curve with Precision as well. This lets you control how fast your GPU fan(s) spin at every temperature level. If your card is getting too hot you may be able to adjust the fan curve for extra cooling.

Does 50 mhz do anything? Like at what mhz increasement will I see a huge difference like lets say at least 10 fps more?
m
0
l
Related resources
October 18, 2013 5:58:58 PM

another thing, should I incease my memory clock? thanks.
m
0
l
a b K Overclocking
October 18, 2013 6:04:17 PM

Not all games scale the same with core clock speed. But for every X% increase in clock speed over the default expect at most X% increase in framerate, keeping in mind it will oftentimes be less than that.

I suggested 50 MHz because that is a good starting interval to bump up your clock speeds. The idea is you keep incrementally increasing clock speeds by 50 MHz and testing for stability so you can more easily find the maximum stable clock speed before you need to start playing with voltages. In fact once you see instability I would go back to the last stable offset and start increasing in smaller intervals (like 5 or 10 MHz) to really see where the boundary is unless you already know for sure you want to increase voltage.

Generally if you are already overclocking core then overclocking memory is not a bad idea. Overclocking memory alone however won't get you anywhere.
m
0
l
October 18, 2013 6:10:32 PM

aznricepuff said:
Not all games scale the same with core clock speed. But for every X% increase in clock speed over the default expect at most X% increase in framerate, keeping in mind it will oftentimes be less than that.

I suggested 50 MHz because that is a good starting interval to bump up your clock speeds. The idea is you keep incrementally increasing clock speeds by 50 MHz and testing for stability so you can more easily find the maximum stable clock speed before you need to start playing with voltages. In fact once you see instability I would go back to the last stable offset and start increasing in smaller intervals (like 5 or 10 MHz) to really see where the boundary is unless you already know for sure you want to increase voltage.

Generally if you are already overclocking core then overclocking memory is not a bad idea. Overclocking memory alone however won't get you anywhere.

Ok, so 80 degrees is bad right? how bout like 75 degrees? Also, what fan speed should I leave my GPU's fan at? is 75% ok or should I make it 80%? thanks! Just wanted to add, do I make the memory clock the same as core clock or a little lower like 60 core and 40 memory. Thanks again!
m
0
l
a b K Overclocking
October 18, 2013 6:21:40 PM

80 degrees is a good upper bound (and I think the default). You can go a bit above it if you want but I recommend leaving the temp target at 80C. (The absolute temp limit for the card is 97C, so don't ever let your card approach or exceed that temp.)

Fan speed is up to you. Higher fan speed will mean more noise, and how much noise is acceptable only you can determine for yourself. You can crank up the fan to 100% if you want; there's no harm in doing so.

Memory clock and core clock offsets are separate. They don't need to be the same. However, for your information, the default memory clock on the 760 should be 1502 MHz. You will sometimes see people reporting effective memory clock, which for the 760 is four times the actual memory clock, so the default effective memory clock on the 760 is 1502x4=6008 MHz. I think a good target to shoot for for the memory clock is 7000 MHz effective clock, which is 1750 MHz actual clock, or a clock offset of +248 MHz. I don't think going any higher is necessary for everyday gaming (and from my own experience with GTX 780, past 7000 MHz is where you start seeing more and more artifacting in games).
m
0
l
February 12, 2014 7:51:34 PM

aznricepuff said:
Yes, it can be overclocked.

Use EVGA Precision X.

First up your power target to maximum. Then start to increase your core offsets in small increments (I would start with 50 MHz increments) and with each increase test the settings under load (either start up a game or use a benchmarking tool like Heaven). Keep increasing the offset as long as everything is stable (no crashes or freezes). Also keep an eye on your temperatures, making sure they don't hit 80C, otherwise your card will throttle the clock, effectively ruining the purpose of the overclock.

Once you see instability, then you have to decide whether to stop there or keep going. If you want to keep going, you will need to start adjusting voltages. Now fair warning: any increase in voltage poses a risk of damaging your card or shortening its lifespan. It's up to you to decide if you want to take that risk.

If you decide to keep going, then use Precision to bump up the voltage offset by the minimum possible amount. Then re-test for stability and pay extra attention to temperature. Any time you increase voltage you will see your card putting out a lot more heat than if you just increase clock offset. If everything is stable and not too hot, then you can continue inching that clock offset higher and just repeat what you've been doing.

Once you reach a good core clock, then you can repeat the process with the memory clock. Keep in mind that games tend to be more finicky about the memory clock than they are with the core clock. Some games won't tolerate very high memory clocks and you'll see it when you're playing as artifacts on your screen. If you start seeing artifacts, then you should dial back the memory clock.

One final note: you can set up a software fan curve with Precision as well. This lets you control how fast your GPU fan(s) spin at every temperature level. If your card is getting too hot you may be able to adjust the fan curve for extra cooling.


I'm overclocking this exact card for the first time. So after I increase Power target I will never decrease it back to 100% while using the overclock?
m
0
l
!