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AMD vs Intel

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October 19, 2013 2:27:52 PM

So I am getting a new gaming computer on cyberpower pc. I have created 2 computers. One with AMD and One with intel.


http://www.cyberpowerpc.com/saved/1FGYUJ - AMD CPU
http://www.cyberpowerpc.com/saved/1FH0R3 - INTEL CPU

EDIT: I just want to know which one is better for my needs. I am not a hardcore gamer just keep in mind. I really like the intel one. so please tell me what to improve on that build.

More about : amd intel

a b à CPUs
October 19, 2013 2:31:26 PM

Are you planning on overclocking?
a c 120 À AMD
a b å Intel
a c 197 à CPUs
October 19, 2013 2:36:54 PM

Build your own PC, it will be cheaper.

Start by telling us your budget?
What games do you play?
What resolution is your monitor?

Do you already have some of the components?
Related resources
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2013 2:40:57 PM

You could build yourself one, like this http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1QKJJ which is very good for current 1080p gaming. Same $750 budget but much better. It is much easier than it looks. If not, go with the AMD build and upgrade to the HD7870. It would improve a lot.
a b À AMD
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2013 2:41:07 PM

Don't get blinded by the lights, we'll make you a better one in your budget.
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2013 2:48:05 PM

As stated above, you can get better performance for the same budget. There are guides on youtube to help you through the build process.

I know cyberpower needs to make a profit but they are seriously overpriced, i.e. +$455 to add a 7970 of unknown brand. At Newegg you can get a 7970 for $279 + a $30 mail in rebate, making it $249. Charging $455 is beyond ridiculous, that's $206 just for the privilege of having them install it.
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2013 2:51:21 PM

Martell1977 said:
As stated above, you can get better performance for the same budget. There are guides on youtube to help you through the build process.

I know cyberpower needs to make a profit but they are seriously overpriced, i.e. +$455 to add a 7970 of unknown brand. At Newegg you can get a 7970 for $279 + a $30 mail in rebate, making it $249. Charging $455 is beyond ridiculous, that $206 just for the privilege of having them install it.


I did not know it was that bad......

Anyways, PC building is fun and by building it yourself you will learn a lot about how a PC works.
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2013 2:54:30 PM

Well if it's totally between those two rigs then the one with I5 and Radeon 7770 is obviously better, but it's almost 100$ more expensive, so that's no brainer...

I bet that with 750$ you can build a much better AMD system. Intel is not very relevant unless you light up cigars with 100 dollar bills.
a b À AMD
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2013 2:59:07 PM

rishiswaz said:
Martell1977 said:
As stated above, you can get better performance for the same budget. There are guides on youtube to help you through the build process.

I know cyberpower needs to make a profit but they are seriously overpriced, i.e. +$455 to add a 7970 of unknown brand. At Newegg you can get a 7970 for $279 + a $30 mail in rebate, making it $249. Charging $455 is beyond ridiculous, that $206 just for the privilege of having them install it.


I did not know it was that bad......

Anyways, PC building is fun and by building it yourself you will learn a lot about how a PC works.

+1, its always fun finding a way to route those 8pin CPU cables cables :p 
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2013 3:07:36 PM

The Q6660 Inside said:

+1, its always fun finding a way to route those 8pin CPU cables cables :p 


That is the stuff nightmares are made of, those 8pin power connectors
a b À AMD
a c 109 à CPUs
October 19, 2013 3:08:18 PM

Gaidax said:
Intel is not very relevant unless you light up cigars with 100 dollar bills.


that's not entirely true. but yes, AMD has awesome performance for budget builds.

I'd recommend building it yourself. There are TONS of videos on youtube that explain the process an while it looks complicated, (what with all the wires) it is quite easy. The hardest parts that you must be super careful is seating the cpu, applying thermal paste, and making sure you put the motherboard standoffs in the case properly. Just be sure to discharge ANY static you have built up before touching any component and you'll be fine.

You'll save a TON of money by doing it yourself and have a much better pc to show for it. And also, you'll feel quite proud of your pc and accomplished that you did it all yourself :) 
a b À AMD
a c 109 à CPUs
October 19, 2013 3:10:45 PM

rishiswaz said:
The Q6660 Inside said:

+1, its always fun finding a way to route those 8pin CPU cables cables :p 


That is the stuff nightmares are made of, those 8pin power connectors


Yeah. That's why I spend a couple extra dollars on an extension cable, and invest in a case that has a cut out or grommet for routing that cable. Otherwise, good luck.
October 19, 2013 3:17:29 PM

rishiswaz said:
Are you planning on overclocking?


I don't plan on doing so because it's a risk for me. I've never overclocked ever in my life. LOL this is my first time ever getting a gaming computer.
a b À AMD
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2013 3:18:40 PM

DylanT said:
rishiswaz said:
Are you planning on overclocking?


I don't plan on doing so because it's a risk for me. I've never overclocked ever in my life. LOL this is my first time ever getting a gaming computer.


GIVE US YOUR BUDGET Gosh!
a b À AMD
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2013 3:19:48 PM

ethereal essence said:
rishiswaz said:
The Q6660 Inside said:

+1, its always fun finding a way to route those 8pin CPU cables cables :p 


That is the stuff nightmares are made of, those 8pin power connectors


Yeah. That's why I spend a couple extra dollars on an extension cable, and invest in a case that has a cut out or grommet for routing that cable. Otherwise, good luck.

I was so used to finding a way to swerve it across practically everywhere when servicing my build in the CM690, that I forgot my new 500R had a hole for the 8 pin cable (see pics in sig) :p 
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus M5A97 R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($93.98 @ Outlet PC)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($87.32 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card ($188.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($49.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $655.22
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-10-19 18:19 EDT-0400)
October 19, 2013 3:27:18 PM

Novuake said:
Build your own PC, it will be cheaper.

Start by telling us your budget?
What games do you play?
What resolution is your monitor?

Do you already have some of the components?


vinhn said:
You could build yourself one, like this http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1QKJJ which is very good for current 1080p gaming. Same $750 budget but much better. It is much easier than it looks. If not, go with the AMD build and upgrade to the HD7870. It would improve a lot.


K I will look at the AMD 7870
a b À AMD
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2013 3:28:44 PM

DylanT said:
Novuake said:
Build your own PC, it will be cheaper.

Start by telling us your budget?
What games do you play?
What resolution is your monitor?

Do you already have some of the components?


vinhn said:
You could build yourself one, like this http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1QKJJ which is very good for current 1080p gaming. Same $750 budget but much better. It is much easier than it looks. If not, go with the AMD build and upgrade to the HD7870. It would improve a lot.


K I will look at the AMD 7870

You might wanna take a look at my build with a 7950, for $100 less than the default CyberPowerPC FX rig with a 7750!
a b À AMD
a c 109 à CPUs
October 19, 2013 3:29:44 PM

The Q6660 Inside said:

You might wanna take a look at my build with a 7950, for $100 less than the default CyberPowerPC FX rig with a 7750!


+1
October 19, 2013 3:30:44 PM

Novuake said:
Build your own PC, it will be cheaper.

Start by telling us your budget?
What games do you play?
What resolution is your monitor?

Do you already have some of the components?


Budget: 600 - 750
I play games like Maplestory, Terraria, Minecraft, Cubeworld, League of Legends, Binding of Isaac, TF2, And there are other ones on steam that I can't remember.

I'm using a 2010 dell monitor I really don't know the resolution because I don't use it a lot. I just use an ordinary laptop.

Cyberpower PC makes the computer for me. I pick the parts they receive it and make it for me and send it to me.
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2013 3:31:58 PM

I have a build with an AMD FX 6300 and a Radeon HD 7870, I did not go for one of those fancy 990FX motherboards, I just got a simple 970 board and am flying through most games at max or high setting at 1080p. You do not have to get something with all the bells and whistles if you are not going to use them.

Best solution

a b à CPUs
October 19, 2013 3:34:31 PM
Share

The Q6660 Inside said:
Benchmarks

CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus M5A97 R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($93.98 @ Outlet PC)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($87.32 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card ($188.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($49.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $655.22
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-10-19 18:19 EDT-0400)


That build is perfect for you.
October 19, 2013 3:37:40 PM

rishiswaz said:
The Q6660 Inside said:
Benchmarks

CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus M5A97 R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($93.98 @ Outlet PC)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($87.32 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card ($188.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($49.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $655.22
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-10-19 18:19 EDT-0400)


That build is perfect for you.


This was the build that you were talking about that you were good with most games in 1080p?
October 19, 2013 3:40:12 PM

rishiswaz said:
The Q6660 Inside said:
Benchmarks

CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus M5A97 R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($93.98 @ Outlet PC)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($87.32 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card ($188.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($49.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $655.22
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-10-19 18:19 EDT-0400)


That build is perfect for you.


The reason why I didn't like building my PC because I don't want to ruin the PC. Since this is my first gaming computer, and I know that there are some videos on youtube that will help me into building my gaming PC. But I am really cautious.
a b À AMD
a c 109 à CPUs
October 19, 2013 3:42:11 PM

DylanT said:
rishiswaz said:
The Q6660 Inside said:
Benchmarks

CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus M5A97 R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($93.98 @ Outlet PC)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($87.32 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card ($188.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($49.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $655.22
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-10-19 18:19 EDT-0400)


That build is perfect for you.


This was the build that you were talking about that you were good with most games in 1080p?


it will out perform anything you'll get from cyber power pc for 100.00 more. by a lot.

seriously man, it isn't hard to build a pc. check out how to videos on youtube. learn about the process of building it and it won't be bad at all. Above all..... TAKE YOUR TIME. here is a 2 part video to get you started...

part one http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPIXAtNGGCw

part two http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_56kyib-Ls

The difference between the cyber power pc builds you listed and this one which is cheaper is night and day in gaming. it would be the difference between playing battlefield 4 on high (with this build) at 1080p and playing it on low at 1080p if you are lucky.
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2013 3:54:07 PM

A lot of the stuff is plug-and-play now. Just be careful for static and you should be good. The hardest part would probably be seating the heatsink on properly or cable management.
a b À AMD
a c 109 à CPUs
October 19, 2013 3:55:03 PM

The two key things to remember here:

1) when screwing your motherboard to the stand offs, and when screwing your cpu cooler to the motherboard (if you need to), or any time you are screwing anything related to your motherboard.... only tighten the screws as tight as they need to be. You want them to be snug but not super tight.

2) When inserting your cpu to the socket... do NOT push the cpu in. Let it go in naturally. Gently lower it in slowly. It is easier than it sounds. Just take your time.
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2013 4:03:42 PM

ethereal essence said:
The two key things to remember here:

1) when screwing your motherboard to the stand offs, and when screwing your cpu cooler to the motherboard (if you need to), or any time you are screwing anything related to your motherboard.... only tighten the screws as tight as they need to be. You want them to be snug but not super tight.

2) When inserting your cpu to the socket... do NOT push the cpu in. Let it go in naturally. Gently lower it in slowly. It is easier than it sounds. Just take your time.


+1, if you screw them in too tight the motherboard can flex and over a long period of time or if it is really tight it will break.
a b À AMD
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2013 5:15:49 PM

rishiswaz said:
ethereal essence said:
The two key things to remember here:

1) when screwing your motherboard to the stand offs, and when screwing your cpu cooler to the motherboard (if you need to), or any time you are screwing anything related to your motherboard.... only tighten the screws as tight as they need to be. You want them to be snug but not super tight.

2) When inserting your cpu to the socket... do NOT push the cpu in. Let it go in naturally. Gently lower it in slowly. It is easier than it sounds. Just take your time.


+1, if you screw them in too tight the motherboard can flex and over a long period of time or if it is really tight it will break.

Well, his 200R should have the standoffs pre-installed.
a b À AMD
a c 109 à CPUs
October 19, 2013 6:20:52 PM

The Q6660 Inside said:
rishiswaz said:
ethereal essence said:
The two key things to remember here:

1) when screwing your motherboard to the stand offs, and when screwing your cpu cooler to the motherboard (if you need to), or any time you are screwing anything related to your motherboard.... only tighten the screws as tight as they need to be. You want them to be snug but not super tight.

2) When inserting your cpu to the socket... do NOT push the cpu in. Let it go in naturally. Gently lower it in slowly. It is easier than it sounds. Just take your time.


+1, if you screw them in too tight the motherboard can flex and over a long period of time or if it is really tight it will break.

Well, his 200R should have the standoffs pre-installed.


yes, all 9 stand offs. for an atx or micro atx case you have to remove 2 stand offs. its not those that you need to be careful with anyway. it is when you screw the mobo to the stand offs. too tight and you could do damage.
a b À AMD
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2013 6:31:00 PM

ethereal essence said:
The Q6660 Inside said:
rishiswaz said:
ethereal essence said:
The two key things to remember here:

1) when screwing your motherboard to the stand offs, and when screwing your cpu cooler to the motherboard (if you need to), or any time you are screwing anything related to your motherboard.... only tighten the screws as tight as they need to be. You want them to be snug but not super tight.

2) When inserting your cpu to the socket... do NOT push the cpu in. Let it go in naturally. Gently lower it in slowly. It is easier than it sounds. Just take your time.


+1, if you screw them in too tight the motherboard can flex and over a long period of time or if it is really tight it will break.

Well, his 200R should have the standoffs pre-installed.


yes, all 9 stand offs. for an atx or micro atx case you have to remove 2 stand offs. its not those that you need to be careful with anyway. it is when you screw the mobo to the stand offs. too tight and you could do damage.

For ATX, you need all 9 AFAIK. For Micro-ATX, you need 8 (some in a different location) I think. The lower end boards have the odd requirement of 6 standoffs.
a b à CPUs
October 19, 2013 6:55:22 PM

The Q6660 Inside said:
ethereal essence said:
The Q6660 Inside said:
rishiswaz said:
ethereal essence said:
The two key things to remember here:

1) when screwing your motherboard to the stand offs, and when screwing your cpu cooler to the motherboard (if you need to), or any time you are screwing anything related to your motherboard.... only tighten the screws as tight as they need to be. You want them to be snug but not super tight.

2) When inserting your cpu to the socket... do NOT push the cpu in. Let it go in naturally. Gently lower it in slowly. It is easier than it sounds. Just take your time.


+1, if you screw them in too tight the motherboard can flex and over a long period of time or if it is really tight it will break.

Well, his 200R should have the standoffs pre-installed.


yes, all 9 stand offs. for an atx or micro atx case you have to remove 2 stand offs. its not those that you need to be careful with anyway. it is when you screw the mobo to the stand offs. too tight and you could do damage.

For ATX, you need all 9 AFAIK. For Micro-ATX, you need 8 (some in a different location) I think. The lower end boards have the odd requirement of 6 standoffs.


I have the 970A G46 in a build somewhere, it is a lower end board. I can check how many standoffs there are.

EDIT: I don't think ASUS would put anything less than standard and the 970A G46 has 6
!