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SLI vs. 1 GPU

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October 21, 2013 4:05:16 PM

So, I keep hearing different opinions whether SLI is better than 1 card or vice-versa but nobody has really explained why. Can someone explain to me which is better? I am planning to upgrade my computer soon and want to know if I should SLI off the bat or not. Apparently it also depends on the games you play and the resolution you want to play in. I mainly play Guild Wars 2 and most single-player games on Steam but sometimes also play Smite and like to play at least 1920 x 1080. So, why would you say one way is better than another? Thanks :) 

More about : sli gpu

October 21, 2013 4:10:43 PM

Generally SLI is for multi-monitor setups, or where youre playing at a high resolution. If you're going to stick to a 1920x1080 monitor, you won't need to SLI.
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October 21, 2013 4:13:38 PM

Get a single card in your price range.

SLI is better in certain cases, sometimes they are cheaper for 2 cards that equal the same performance per dollar. This does not take into account the extra heat that it will make in your computer or the extra power.
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October 21, 2013 4:18:27 PM

There will, always be opinions, but really SLI is for powerful cards when 1 is not enough. Mediocre cards are best upgraded to single better performing cards.
If you have for example GTX550Ti and add another one in SLI there is single card solutions that would do better for not a obscene amount of money GTX760 for example. In the example I would just upgrade to a single more powerful card like the GTX760.
Now you can SLI 2 x GTX760 and get better than GTX780 performance for less money. Here I would seriously consider going with the SLI setup.
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October 21, 2013 4:19:39 PM

what card do you have......... specifically?
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October 21, 2013 4:22:37 PM

Shubunkus said:
So, I keep hearing different opinions whether SLI is better than 1 card or vice-versa but nobody has really explained why. Can someone explain to me which is better? I am planning to upgrade my computer soon and want to know if I should SLI off the bat or not. Apparently it also depends on the games you play and the resolution you want to play in. I mainly play Guild Wars 2 and most single-player games on Steam but sometimes also play Smite and like to play at least 1920 x 1080. So, why would you say one way is better than another? Thanks :) 


Sli on a single 19 x 10 monitor is still the best because like tits and testicles two is better than one! ;) 
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October 21, 2013 4:37:20 PM

not all the time................. no sense sli-ing 2 garbage cards or 2 1gig cards.
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October 21, 2013 4:43:36 PM

swifty_morgan said:
not all the time................. no sense sli-ing 2 garbage cards or 2 1gig cards.


My 560Ti's were 1GB cards and they were worth it in SLi so bang goes that theory IMHO.
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October 21, 2013 4:48:23 PM

enemy1g said:
Generally SLI is for multi-monitor setups, or where youre playing at a high resolution. If you're going to stick to a 1920x1080 monitor, you won't need to SLI.


I only use one monitor for the time being so thanks for your input.
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October 21, 2013 4:54:50 PM

anti-painkilla said:
Get a single card in your price range.

SLI is better in certain cases, sometimes they are cheaper for 2 cards that equal the same performance per dollar. This does not take into account the extra heat that it will make in your computer or the extra power.


I didn't even state my price range O.o Are you a wizard? Lol. Also, is the extra heat or power consumption that much of a factor that it trumps the "bang for buck" argument with SLI?

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October 21, 2013 4:55:15 PM

rolli59 said:
There will, always be opinions, but really SLI is for powerful cards when 1 is not enough. Mediocre cards are best upgraded to single better performing cards.
If you have for example GTX550Ti and add another one in SLI there is single card solutions that would do better for not a obscene amount of money GTX760 for example. In the example I would just upgrade to a single more powerful card like the GTX760.
Now you can SLI 2 x GTX760 and get better than GTX780 performance for less money. Here I would seriously consider going with the SLI setup.


Yeah, right now I only have a GTX560 so I will definitely get at least one, new, high-end car. As a matter of fact, I was looking at the 760 and it really appealed to me! If I end up grabbing the 760 would you recommend an SLI set-up right off the bat?

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October 21, 2013 4:55:38 PM

swifty_morgan said:
what card do you have......... specifically?


Right now I have a GTX560 but I'm not asking whether to SLI that or get a new card but if it is generally better to SLI.
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October 21, 2013 4:56:13 PM

Mousemonkey said:
Shubunkus said:
So, I keep hearing different opinions whether SLI is better than 1 card or vice-versa but nobody has really explained why. Can someone explain to me which is better? I am planning to upgrade my computer soon and want to know if I should SLI off the bat or not. Apparently it also depends on the games you play and the resolution you want to play in. I mainly play Guild Wars 2 and most single-player games on Steam but sometimes also play Smite and like to play at least 1920 x 1080. So, why would you say one way is better than another? Thanks :) 


Sli on a single 19 x 10 monitor is still the best because like tits and testicles two is better than one! ;) 


Haha, thanks for that!
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October 21, 2013 4:56:47 PM

Mousemonkey said:
swifty_morgan said:
not all the time................. no sense sli-ing 2 garbage cards or 2 1gig cards.


My 560Ti's were 1GB cards and they were worth it in SLi so bang goes that theory IMHO.


last time those 560's were 2gig cards ( palit I think )............ now they are 1gig cards............... and yes, I still think 560's suck ( ed )
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October 21, 2013 5:21:59 PM

Shubunkus said:
anti-painkilla said:
Get a single card in your price range.

SLI is better in certain cases, sometimes they are cheaper for 2 cards that equal the same performance per dollar. This does not take into account the extra heat that it will make in your computer or the extra power.


I didn't even state my price range O.o Are you a wizard? Lol. Also, is the extra heat or power consumption that much of a factor that it trumps the "bang for buck" argument with SLI?



swifty_morgan said:
Mousemonkey said:
swifty_morgan said:
not all the time................. no sense sli-ing 2 garbage cards or 2 1gig cards.


My 560Ti's were 1GB cards and they were worth it in SLi so bang goes that theory IMHO.


last time those 560's were 2gig cards ( palit I think )............ now they are 1gig cards............... and yes, I still think 560's suck ( ed )


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October 21, 2013 5:26:19 PM

Shubunkus said:
anti-painkilla said:
Get a single card in your price range.

SLI is better in certain cases, sometimes they are cheaper for 2 cards that equal the same performance per dollar. This does not take into account the extra heat that it will make in your computer or the extra power.


I didn't even state my price range O.o Are you a wizard? Lol. Also, is the extra heat or power consumption that much of a factor that it trumps the "bang for buck" argument with SLI?


No it doesn't IMHO.

swifty_morgan said:
Mousemonkey said:
swifty_morgan said:
not all the time................. no sense sli-ing 2 garbage cards or 2 1gig cards.


My 560Ti's were 1GB cards and they were worth it in SLi so bang goes that theory IMHO.


last time those 560's were 2gig cards ( palit I think )............ now they are 1gig cards............... and yes, I still think 560's suck ( ed )


I don't know where you got that from because mine were the 1GB version and I never said anything to the contrary.

http://www.palit.biz/palit/vgapro.php?id=1497
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October 21, 2013 5:32:12 PM

Shubunkus said:
rolli59 said:
There will, always be opinions, but really SLI is for powerful cards when 1 is not enough. Mediocre cards are best upgraded to single better performing cards.
If you have for example GTX550Ti and add another one in SLI there is single card solutions that would do better for not a obscene amount of money GTX760 for example. In the example I would just upgrade to a single more powerful card like the GTX760.
Now you can SLI 2 x GTX760 and get better than GTX780 performance for less money. Here I would seriously consider going with the SLI setup.


Yeah, right now I only have a GTX560 so I will definitely get at least one, new, high-end car. As a matter of fact, I was looking at the 760 and it really appealed to me! If I end up grabbing the 760 would you recommend an SLI set-up right off the bat?


About the best solution you can get for $500 so yes.
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October 21, 2013 5:37:42 PM

rolli59 said:
Shubunkus said:
rolli59 said:
There will, always be opinions, but really SLI is for powerful cards when 1 is not enough. Mediocre cards are best upgraded to single better performing cards.
If you have for example GTX550Ti and add another one in SLI there is single card solutions that would do better for not a obscene amount of money GTX760 for example. In the example I would just upgrade to a single more powerful card like the GTX760.
Now you can SLI 2 x GTX760 and get better than GTX780 performance for less money. Here I would seriously consider going with the SLI setup.


Yeah, right now I only have a GTX560 so I will definitely get at least one, new, high-end car. As a matter of fact, I was looking at the 760 and it really appealed to me! If I end up grabbing the 760 would you recommend an SLI set-up right off the bat?


About the best solution you can get for $500 so yes.


Although SLi'd 660Ti's would be close enough but cheaper I reckon.
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October 21, 2013 6:12:14 PM

rolli59 said:
Mousemonkey said:
rolli59 said:
Unfortunately there is only one GTX660Ti cheaper in the US than the cheapest GTX760. http://pcpartpicker.com/parts/video-card/#c=113,142&sor...


Nice list but I'm not in the US.

Same applies to the UK http://uk.pcpartpicker.com/parts/video-card/#c=113,142&...
There have been price drops on the GTX660 but yet to see it on the Ti.


Again that is just a list and if they are not cheaper then maybe there is a reason for that like 1152 cores Vs 1344 cores.
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October 21, 2013 6:12:24 PM

rolli59 said:
Mousemonkey said:
rolli59 said:
Unfortunately there is only one GTX660Ti cheaper in the US than the cheapest GTX760. http://pcpartpicker.com/parts/video-card/#c=113,142&sor...


Nice list but I'm not in the US.

Same applies to the UK http://uk.pcpartpicker.com/parts/video-card/#c=113,142&...
There have been price drops on the GTX660 but yet to see it on the Ti.


I live in Canada and usually buy from my local CanadaComputers as I don't generally shop online unless there is an amazing deal but the cheapest 660Ti is only $5 less than the 760.
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October 21, 2013 6:13:41 PM

I feel like this thread has gotten off-topic. I really only want to know what is better in your opinion or facts-wise: SLI or 1 high end GPU. Please provide reasoning. Thanks :) 
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October 21, 2013 6:32:14 PM

Shubunkus said:
I feel like this thread has gotten off-topic. I really only want to know what is better in your opinion or facts-wise: SLI or 1 high end GPU. Please provide reasoning. Thanks :) 


I will always go SLi as it gives good bang for buck and if a card needs to be RMA'd then I can still use the rig in the meantime plus I get two cards to play with at upgrade time. I also Fold and so get more from two cards than I would with just the one.
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October 21, 2013 6:36:18 PM

Not a wizard.

I personally would go for a single high end current generation card over SLI 2x mid range cards or older generation cards.

I care about heat and power consumption.

If you do your research and look into how the SLI compares to a single card, you can find what works better for your price range.

All is relative to how much you want to spend. If you want 2 titans, then yes it will be better than a single titan. If you SLI high end cards (770, 780, 7950, 7970), then yes SLI is better. If you are tossing up between 2 mid range cards or a single high end card, do your research.

How much do you want to spend?
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October 21, 2013 6:46:07 PM

Shubunkus said:
I feel like this thread has gotten off-topic. I really only want to know what is better in your opinion or facts-wise: SLI or 1 high end GPU. Please provide reasoning. Thanks :) 

Fact wise, 2 gpu's of equivelant performance of a single gpu, will usually have more frame time variance (difference in output times of the frames rendered by each gpu to the monitor, potentially causing micro-stutter). Having said that, nvidia has this very well under control and is not normally bad enough to cause visible microstutter. It also requires a more expensive/larger motherboard that supports sli, and often consumes slightly more power. I always get the fastest single gpu i can get first, that leaves room to upgrade to a second card in the future for sli to increase performance when i need/can afford it. As mousemonkey has said, you can get more performance by geting 2 mid range cards in sli, than one high end card, for the same $$$. Also keep in mind lower end cards often have less vram and you do not combine vram when you run 2 cards in sli. at the moment it is recommended for 1080p to have cards with 2gb vram, as many games use more than 1gb vram
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October 21, 2013 6:46:30 PM

anti-painkilla said:
Not a wizard.

I personally would go for a single high end current generation card over SLI 2x mid range cards or older generation cards.

I care about heat and power consumption.

If you do your research and look into how the SLI compares to a single card, you can find what works better for your price range.

All is relative to how much you want to spend. If you want 2 titans, then yes it will be better than a single titan. If you SLI high end cards (770, 780, 7950, 7970), then yes SLI is better. If you are tossing up between 2 mid range cards or a single high end card, do your research.

How much do you want to spend?


Again, I was asking more what would be better in general than my situation at the moment but would you consider a 760 high-end or mid-range? Because from doing my research I feel like if I SLI'ed two 760's I would be getting the best deal for about $500
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October 21, 2013 7:14:42 PM

I'll tell you what to do. buy 1 better card. make sure it has at least 2gigs of vram. 560's were crap when they first came out and they are worse for gaming now.

sli-ing will do no good, especially with low end/lower medium grade 1gig cards.

even if you put a 2gig 6950 in your machine the performance increase will be quite noticeable.

next thread give system specs.
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October 21, 2013 7:36:56 PM

swifty_morgan said:
I'll tell you what to do. buy 1 better card. make sure it has at least 2gigs of vram. 560's were crap when they first came out and they are worse for gaming now.

sli-ing will do no good, especially with low end/lower medium grade 1gig cards.

even if you put a 2gig 6950 in your machine the performance increase will be quite noticeable.

next thread give system specs.


Really?! Please understand the thread before you reply to. I apologize if it was unclear as to what I was asking. I wasn't wondering if I should SLI my 560 but if SLI'ing is better in, as I've said before, GENERAL. Also, if the 560 sucks so much, why can it still hold a bunh of modern games at high settings, lag-free on my computer?
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October 21, 2013 7:47:59 PM

Apologies for half-a** reading this thread up til now, I could have read between the lines a bit more.

I would consider the 760 top of mid range cards.

For $500 you could get 2 760's that would perform better than a $400 770. Read this thread, as Sangeet Khatri sums up quite nicely

'760 SLI > 770

But if you are playing in 1080p then you won't notice a difference between the two, so if you have a 1080p monitor, then you should go for the 770 as it is cheaper and it can be SLI'ed later for epic performance which would definitely thrash the 760 SLI of course.

So we can conclude that :

1. 760 SLI > 770 when it comes to power
2. 760 SLI and 770 anyone would be awesome for gaming at 1080p. Almost no difference.
3. 770 can be SLI'ed later for much better performance when needed (maybe after a year).
4. Single 770 is cheaper currently about 80-100 dollars (depends on which manufacturer's card you plan to SLI)

So, my recommendation for now would be a 770 because for 1080p there is no difference at all between both of them. But if you want to play in resolutions higher than 1080p, then go for the 760 SLI.

I hope this answers your question. Is there anything else I can help you in?'



My question would be, do you need that much 'horsepower' so to speak? Would a single 760 or 770 suit your needs and upgrade other components? An SSD for faster load times? A bigger monitor? Just something to think about. If you are going to play recent eye candy games, Metro and BF4 then the SLI 760's are the way to go. Or equivalent AMD cards depending on performance per dollar.

I only play LoL and my 560ti is overkill for it, I will upgrade my GPU early next year but not for gaming but for folding.

Edit: Forgot apology =P
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October 21, 2013 7:53:52 PM

Shubunkus said:
swifty_morgan said:
I'll tell you what to do. buy 1 better card. make sure it has at least 2gigs of vram. 560's were crap when they first came out and they are worse for gaming now.

sli-ing will do no good, especially with low end/lower medium grade 1gig cards.

even if you put a 2gig 6950 in your machine the performance increase will be quite noticeable.

next thread give system specs.


Really?! Please understand the thread before you reply to. I apologize if it was unclear as to what I was asking. I wasn't wondering if I should SLI my 560 but if SLI'ing is better in, as I've said before, GENERAL. Also, if the 560 sucks so much, why can it still hold a bunh of modern games at high settings, lag-free on my computer?


760's in sli are great, performs better than a titan in most cases, and are much cheaper, except higher resolutions that use more than 2gb vram. If the 760's cost the same as a 780, i'd probably take the 780 for the extra vram, as future games are likely to use more, and you then have an upgrade path to dual 780's, if you ever need that much power.
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October 21, 2013 8:50:12 PM

Shubunkus said:
swifty_morgan said:
I'll tell you what to do. buy 1 better card. make sure it has at least 2gigs of vram. 560's were crap when they first came out and they are worse for gaming now.

sli-ing will do no good, especially with low end/lower medium grade 1gig cards.

even if you put a 2gig 6950 in your machine the performance increase will be quite noticeable.

next thread give system specs.


Really?! Please understand the thread before you reply to. I apologize if it was unclear as to what I was asking. I wasn't wondering if I should SLI my 560 but if SLI'ing is better in, as I've said before, GENERAL. Also, if the 560 sucks so much, why can it still hold a bunh of modern games at high settings, lag-free on my computer?


I doubt it............. running at 1200 resolution or less? you don't know how bad they really are until you dump them............... how's about a nice 7950 instead?
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Best solution

October 21, 2013 9:05:40 PM

Let's use the GTX 760 and GTX 780 as the example. A 760 runs for about $250. A 780 runs for $670. Two 760s in SLI perform better than the 780, in fact, it very closely rivals the GTX Titan (source). Looking at it from a price/performance perspective, two 760s run for $500, which is 34% cheaper than a 780, and a whole two times cheaper than a Titan. Basically, the SLI variant smokes the more high end cards in a pure price/performance perspective. However, there are costs associated with running two cards in SLI that are less obvious. As some people have said, having two cards will draw more power than one, and because the two cards are close together, they will definitely generate more heat. Your motherboard will also need to be SLI capable. Looking at it in a long-term view, having two cards in SLI really limits your options for further upgrades when you need more performance. The scaling (that is, how much more performance you get for adding one more card) really drops down when you add on a third card, to the point where it is not worth it. As a result, if you want to upgrade later you will have to get rid of your 760s and replace them both with another card. However, as some people suggested, if you avoid the SLI path completely and buy a stronger card right now, then if you want to upgrade in the future you just simply add on a second card in SLI to upgrade your computer and that will keep you well in the comfort zone for another year or two. In conclusion, it really comes down to how much heat, power consumption, and long-term options matter to you. If you don't care about the extra heat and the extra power consumption and plan to build a new computer altogether in the future, then go for the SLI because it will give better performance in the short run. If you are building your first computer right now and plan to upgrade your computer later (that is, not building a new one altogether), then I would recommend going for a more expensive single GPU because it will generate less heat (which helps to prolong the parts, too), draw less power, and more importantly, give you options for future upgrades.
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October 22, 2013 1:27:49 PM

DudeMartin said:
Let's use the GTX 760 and GTX 780 as the example. A 760 runs for about $250. A 780 runs for $670. Two 760s in SLI perform better than the 780, in fact, it very closely rivals the GTX Titan (source). Looking at it from a price/performance perspective, two 760s run for $500, which is 34% cheaper than a 780, and a whole two times cheaper than a Titan. Basically, the SLI variant smokes the more high end cards in a pure price/performance perspective. However, there are costs associated with running two cards in SLI that are less obvious. As some people have said, having two cards will draw more power than one, and because the two cards are close together, they will definitely generate more heat. Your motherboard will also need to be SLI capable. Looking at it in a long-term view, having two cards in SLI really limits your options for further upgrades when you need more performance. The scaling (that is, how much more performance you get for adding one more card) really drops down when you add on a third card, to the point where it is not worth it. As a result, if you want to upgrade later you will have to get rid of your 760s and replace them both with another card. However, as some people suggested, if you avoid the SLI path completely and buy a stronger card right now, then if you want to upgrade in the future you just simply add on a second card in SLI to upgrade your computer and that will keep you well in the comfort zone for another year or two. In conclusion, it really comes down to how much heat, power consumption, and long-term options matter to you. If you don't care about the extra heat and the extra power consumption and plan to build a new computer altogether in the future, then go for the SLI because it will give better performance in the short run. If you are building your first computer right now and plan to upgrade your computer later (that is, not building a new one altogether), then I would recommend going for a more expensive single GPU because it will generate less heat (which helps to prolong the parts, too), draw less power, and more importantly, give you options for future upgrades.


I am definitely picking this as best solution. It was by far the best comparison and on topic solution so far and it really helped. I don't understand why other people want my specs when I was just asking which is better in general. Anyways, now I'm going to ask a specific question for my case. I am a young student with no job. I'm on the look out right now for a any job that would hire me so I can keep my love for PC gaming and PC's in general alive. So for me, my most important factor would be price for performance and that is why SLI 760's have really caught my eye. I already have a mobo that can handle 2 way SLI so I don't really need to invest anymore on that. In my situation, what would you recommend? SLI or one really strong card? I have a Corsair TX 750 PSU so would that be able to hold SLI 760's? If not and I would have to buy a new one, would it just be better to get, like you mentioned, a 780? Thanks :) 
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October 22, 2013 1:40:32 PM

Shubunkus said:
DudeMartin said:
Let's use the GTX 760 and GTX 780 as the example. A 760 runs for about $250. A 780 runs for $670. Two 760s in SLI perform better than the 780, in fact, it very closely rivals the GTX Titan (source). Looking at it from a price/performance perspective, two 760s run for $500, which is 34% cheaper than a 780, and a whole two times cheaper than a Titan. Basically, the SLI variant smokes the more high end cards in a pure price/performance perspective. However, there are costs associated with running two cards in SLI that are less obvious. As some people have said, having two cards will draw more power than one, and because the two cards are close together, they will definitely generate more heat. Your motherboard will also need to be SLI capable. Looking at it in a long-term view, having two cards in SLI really limits your options for further upgrades when you need more performance. The scaling (that is, how much more performance you get for adding one more card) really drops down when you add on a third card, to the point where it is not worth it. As a result, if you want to upgrade later you will have to get rid of your 760s and replace them both with another card. However, as some people suggested, if you avoid the SLI path completely and buy a stronger card right now, then if you want to upgrade in the future you just simply add on a second card in SLI to upgrade your computer and that will keep you well in the comfort zone for another year or two. In conclusion, it really comes down to how much heat, power consumption, and long-term options matter to you. If you don't care about the extra heat and the extra power consumption and plan to build a new computer altogether in the future, then go for the SLI because it will give better performance in the short run. If you are building your first computer right now and plan to upgrade your computer later (that is, not building a new one altogether), then I would recommend going for a more expensive single GPU because it will generate less heat (which helps to prolong the parts, too), draw less power, and more importantly, give you options for future upgrades.


I am definitely picking this as best solution. It was by far the best comparison and on topic solution so far and it really helped. I don't understand why other people want my specs when I was just asking which is better in general. Anyways, now I'm going to ask a specific question for my case. I am a young student with no job. I'm on the look out right now for a any job that would hire me so I can keep my love for PC gaming and PC's in general alive. So for me, my most important factor would be price for performance and that is why SLI 760's have really caught my eye. I already have a mobo that can handle 2 way SLI so I don't really need to invest anymore on that. In my situation, what would you recommend? SLI or one really strong card? I have a Corsair TX 750 PSU so would that be able to hold SLI 760's? If not and I would have to buy a new one, would it just be better to get, like you mentioned, a 780? Thanks :) 


The GTX760 is a 170w card just as the 560Ti is and I ran SLi'd on a 620w PSU. And if I were in your position I would still go with SLi from the start.
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October 22, 2013 1:51:40 PM

Shubunkus said:
DudeMartin said:
Let's use the GTX 760 and GTX 780 as the example. A 760 runs for about $250. A 780 runs for $670. Two 760s in SLI perform better than the 780, in fact, it very closely rivals the GTX Titan (source). Looking at it from a price/performance perspective, two 760s run for $500, which is 34% cheaper than a 780, and a whole two times cheaper than a Titan. Basically, the SLI variant smokes the more high end cards in a pure price/performance perspective. However, there are costs associated with running two cards in SLI that are less obvious. As some people have said, having two cards will draw more power than one, and because the two cards are close together, they will definitely generate more heat. Your motherboard will also need to be SLI capable. Looking at it in a long-term view, having two cards in SLI really limits your options for further upgrades when you need more performance. The scaling (that is, how much more performance you get for adding one more card) really drops down when you add on a third card, to the point where it is not worth it. As a result, if you want to upgrade later you will have to get rid of your 760s and replace them both with another card. However, as some people suggested, if you avoid the SLI path completely and buy a stronger card right now, then if you want to upgrade in the future you just simply add on a second card in SLI to upgrade your computer and that will keep you well in the comfort zone for another year or two. In conclusion, it really comes down to how much heat, power consumption, and long-term options matter to you. If you don't care about the extra heat and the extra power consumption and plan to build a new computer altogether in the future, then go for the SLI because it will give better performance in the short run. If you are building your first computer right now and plan to upgrade your computer later (that is, not building a new one altogether), then I would recommend going for a more expensive single GPU because it will generate less heat (which helps to prolong the parts, too), draw less power, and more importantly, give you options for future upgrades.


I am definitely picking this as best solution. It was by far the best comparison and on topic solution so far and it really helped. I don't understand why other people want my specs when I was just asking which is better in general. Anyways, now I'm going to ask a specific question for my case. I am a young student with no job. I'm on the look out right now for a any job that would hire me so I can keep my love for PC gaming and PC's in general alive. So for me, my most important factor would be price for performance and that is why SLI 760's have really caught my eye. I already have a mobo that can handle 2 way SLI so I don't really need to invest anymore on that. In my situation, what would you recommend? SLI or one really strong card? I have a Corsair TX 750 PSU so would that be able to hold SLI 760's? If not and I would have to buy a new one, would it just be better to get, like you mentioned, a 780? Thanks :) 


Right now, two 760s in SLI will give you considerably better performance over the GTX 780 for 34% less price ($180). If you plan to stay with this rig for a while without making any changes, the SLI option is better. If you do plan to upgrade in a year or two, then the single GTX 780 right now option is better because it leaves you room for upgrading (you can just buy another 780, perhaps when they're cheaper, and just add it on) in the future. Oh and about the PSU, you should be fine. You will be coming close to the power supply's capacity, but it will power your parts fine. I personally like to stay in a comfortable zone with my power consumption, that is, I buy a PSU with at least like 200 more Watts than my machine will use. This is because it helps to prolong the PSU because they wear out faster when constantly running at full capacity, and because they are more efficient when they are not running at full capacity (source). But if you want to save some money, your current PSU is fine.
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October 22, 2013 1:57:11 PM

DudeMartin said:
Shubunkus said:
DudeMartin said:
Let's use the GTX 760 and GTX 780 as the example. A 760 runs for about $250. A 780 runs for $670. Two 760s in SLI perform better than the 780, in fact, it very closely rivals the GTX Titan (source). Looking at it from a price/performance perspective, two 760s run for $500, which is 34% cheaper than a 780, and a whole two times cheaper than a Titan. Basically, the SLI variant smokes the more high end cards in a pure price/performance perspective. However, there are costs associated with running two cards in SLI that are less obvious. As some people have said, having two cards will draw more power than one, and because the two cards are close together, they will definitely generate more heat. Your motherboard will also need to be SLI capable. Looking at it in a long-term view, having two cards in SLI really limits your options for further upgrades when you need more performance. The scaling (that is, how much more performance you get for adding one more card) really drops down when you add on a third card, to the point where it is not worth it. As a result, if you want to upgrade later you will have to get rid of your 760s and replace them both with another card. However, as some people suggested, if you avoid the SLI path completely and buy a stronger card right now, then if you want to upgrade in the future you just simply add on a second card in SLI to upgrade your computer and that will keep you well in the comfort zone for another year or two. In conclusion, it really comes down to how much heat, power consumption, and long-term options matter to you. If you don't care about the extra heat and the extra power consumption and plan to build a new computer altogether in the future, then go for the SLI because it will give better performance in the short run. If you are building your first computer right now and plan to upgrade your computer later (that is, not building a new one altogether), then I would recommend going for a more expensive single GPU because it will generate less heat (which helps to prolong the parts, too), draw less power, and more importantly, give you options for future upgrades.


I am definitely picking this as best solution. It was by far the best comparison and on topic solution so far and it really helped. I don't understand why other people want my specs when I was just asking which is better in general. Anyways, now I'm going to ask a specific question for my case. I am a young student with no job. I'm on the look out right now for a any job that would hire me so I can keep my love for PC gaming and PC's in general alive. So for me, my most important factor would be price for performance and that is why SLI 760's have really caught my eye. I already have a mobo that can handle 2 way SLI so I don't really need to invest anymore on that. In my situation, what would you recommend? SLI or one really strong card? I have a Corsair TX 750 PSU so would that be able to hold SLI 760's? If not and I would have to buy a new one, would it just be better to get, like you mentioned, a 780? Thanks :) 


Right now, two 760s in SLI will give you considerably better performance over the GTX 780 for 34% less price ($180). If you plan to stay with this rig for a while without making any changes, the SLI option is better. If you do plan to upgrade in a year or two, then the single GTX 780 right now option is better because it leaves you room for upgrading (you can just buy another 780, perhaps when they're cheaper, and just add it on) in the future. Oh and about the PSU, you should be fine. You will be coming close to the power supply's capacity, but it will power your parts fine. I personally like to stay in a comfortable zone with my power consumption, that is, I buy a PSU with at least like 200 more Watts than my machine will use. This is because it helps to prolong the PSU because they wear out faster when constantly running at full capacity, and because they are more efficient when they are not running at full capacity. But if you want to save some money, your current PSU is fine.


OK, thanks!
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October 22, 2013 1:59:51 PM

No problem. Best of luck!
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!