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i5-4670k overclocking help

Last response: in Overclocking
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October 22, 2013 4:57:28 PM

hi guys,

I recently bought an intel i5-4670k with a msi z87-g45 mobo with a corsair h110.

I have tried to overclock and stress test but in need of help.

First off, I have tried to pull my cpu frequeny to 4.0Ghz with auto voltage.



When I stress test this I get to a voltage point of 1.39V maximum at full load.

The temperature doesn't seem to dangerous but from what I read, that is a very high voltage.

Also, I tried stress testing it at 3.4GHz with cpu voltage as auto but voltage still strikes up to around 1.26V.

So I have two questions:

1. Is it OK to use "auto" for cpu voltage?

2. is my CPU faulty at all? Because it requires a high voltage to keep it stable at 3.4GHz.

Thanks


**

Also, when I monitor my Vcore, it sometimes suddenly spikes up to 2.04V for a very very short time. Nothing happens, but is this normal?

**

Artic MX-4 thermal and FSP 650W power supply

More about : 4670k overclocking

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October 22, 2013 5:02:19 PM

jaeyong92 said:
hi guys,

I recently bought an intel i5-4670k with a msi z87-g45 mobo with a corsair h110.

I have tried to overclock and stress test but in need of help.

First off, I have tried to pull my cpu frequeny to 4.0Ghz with auto voltage.



When I stress test this I get to a voltage point of 1.39V maximum at full load.

The temperature doesn't seem to dangerous but from what I read, that is a very high voltage.

Also, I tried stress testing it at 3.4GHz with cpu voltage as auto but voltage still strikes up to around 1.26V.

So I have two questions:

1. Is it OK to use "auto" for cpu voltage?

2. is my CPU faulty at all? Because it requires a high voltage to keep it stable at 3.4GHz.

Thanks


**

Also, when I monitor my Vcore, it sometimes suddenly spikes up to 2.04V for a very very short time. Nothing happens, but is this normal?

**

Artic MX-4 thermal and FSP 650W power supply


Do NOT use AUTO while overclocking. It can damage your CPU if you do not know what you are doing. I would set it to manual with the default CPU voltage and then set it to 4GHz. That should be plenty. If you want to go higher for 4.2GHz set the voltage up a few more volts.

I know that on my 3770K at 1.12 volts I can run at 4.2GHz without any issues.

I would defiantly do some googling before you damage your system.

UPDATE: Here is a guide for you!
https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/41234-intel-haswel...
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October 22, 2013 5:04:09 PM

What voltage should I start at?

jkhoward said:
jaeyong92 said:
hi guys,

I recently bought an intel i5-4670k with a msi z87-g45 mobo with a corsair h110.

I have tried to overclock and stress test but in need of help.

First off, I have tried to pull my cpu frequeny to 4.0Ghz with auto voltage.



When I stress test this I get to a voltage point of 1.39V maximum at full load.

The temperature doesn't seem to dangerous but from what I read, that is a very high voltage.

Also, I tried stress testing it at 3.4GHz with cpu voltage as auto but voltage still strikes up to around 1.26V.

So I have two questions:

1. Is it OK to use "auto" for cpu voltage?

2. is my CPU faulty at all? Because it requires a high voltage to keep it stable at 3.4GHz.

Thanks


**

Also, when I monitor my Vcore, it sometimes suddenly spikes up to 2.04V for a very very short time. Nothing happens, but is this normal?

**

Artic MX-4 thermal and FSP 650W power supply


Do NOT use AUTO while overclocking. It can damage your CPU if you do not know what you are doing. I would set it to manual with the default CPU voltage and then set it to 4GHz. That should be plenty. If you want to go higher for 4.2GHz set the voltage up a few more volts.

I know that on my 3770K at 1.12 volts I can run at 4.2GHz without any issues.

I would defiantly do some googling before you damage your system.

https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/41234-intel-haswel...


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October 22, 2013 5:11:29 PM

From my understanding monitoring your voltage from a piece of software such as CPU-Z is unreliable, it is always best to monitor your voltages through on-board voltage checkpoints. But in regards to your questions.

1- auto voltage is ok for stock cpu settings but is always best to set your vcore to a set number in the bios. I currently have a 4.5Ghz OC on my 2500k at 1.35V as a reference point, however i believe that my chip requires unusually high voltage.

2- I do not believe your cpu is faulty. 1.26V isnt a high voltage, thats actually quite low. A safe vcore would be up to 1.35V max in my opinion, 1.35 to 1.4 is somewhat safe but that would be reaching the point to where your cpu can start to degrade. And DO NOT go above 1.4.
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October 22, 2013 5:13:51 PM

Take a look at the provided link. That guide will be VERY helpful in your overclocking adventures. To find the CPU default voltage set the voltage to AUTO in the BIOS and then reboot. The number that appears to AUTO is the stock VCORE of your processor. Work from there and move up but follow that guide and you will be in heaven(;
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October 22, 2013 5:17:41 PM

I use the program "MSI command Center" that came with my mobo to monitor the cpu voltage. Would that be unreliable too?

Alex19961130 said:
From my understanding monitoring your voltage from a piece of software such as CPU-Z is unreliable, it is always best to monitor your voltages through on-board voltage checkpoints. But in regards to your questions.

1- auto voltage is ok for stock cpu settings but is always best to set your vcore to a set number in the bios. I currently have a 4.5Ghz OC on my 2500k at 1.35V as a reference point, however i believe that my chip requires unusually high voltage.

2- I do not believe your cpu is faulty. 1.26V isnt a high voltage, thats actually quite low. A safe vcore would be up to 1.35V max in my opinion, 1.35 to 1.4 is somewhat safe but that would be reaching the point to where your cpu can start to degrade. And DO NOT go above 1.4.


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October 22, 2013 5:19:06 PM

default voltage shows as 1.08V. Do I manually set the cpu voltage to 1.08 and start stres testing from 3.5?

jkhoward said:
Take a look at the provided link. That guide will be VERY helpful in your overclocking adventures. To find the CPU default voltage set the voltage to AUTO in the BIOS and then reboot. The number that appears to AUTO is the stock VCORE of your processor. Work from there and move up but follow that guide and you will be in heaven(;


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a b à CPUs
October 22, 2013 5:21:18 PM

jaeyong92 said:
default voltage shows as 1.08V. Do I manually set the cpu voltage to 1.08 and start stres testing from 3.5?

jkhoward said:
Take a look at the provided link. That guide will be VERY helpful in your overclocking adventures. To find the CPU default voltage set the voltage to AUTO in the BIOS and then reboot. The number that appears to AUTO is the stock VCORE of your processor. Work from there and move up but follow that guide and you will be in heaven(;




Set the voltage to 1.08V and then set the multiplier to 40 (4.0GHz) and see if the system is stable. If the system is not stable try to raise the voltage to 1.13V and try again until it is stable.
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October 22, 2013 5:26:39 PM

jaeyong92 said:
I use the program "MSI command Center" that came with my mobo to monitor the cpu voltage. Would that be unreliable too?

Alex19961130 said:
From my understanding monitoring your voltage from a piece of software such as CPU-Z is unreliable, it is always best to monitor your voltages through on-board voltage checkpoints. But in regards to your questions.

1- auto voltage is ok for stock cpu settings but is always best to set your vcore to a set number in the bios. I currently have a 4.5Ghz OC on my 2500k at 1.35V as a reference point, however i believe that my chip requires unusually high voltage.

2- I do not believe your cpu is faulty. 1.26V isnt a high voltage, thats actually quite low. A safe vcore would be up to 1.35V max in my opinion, 1.35 to 1.4 is somewhat safe but that would be reaching the point to where your cpu can start to degrade. And DO NOT go above 1.4.



Do as much of the work in the BIOS as you can. Because when you OC through windows there's all sorts of bugs and glitches that could go wrong ( had that happen to me with Gigabyte click bios). But MSI command center is still software so i wouldn't use it. Set the vcore manually and it should never go above the specified number. Start at lets say... 1.3, intel burn test it and if it passes, reduce vcore a bit, if it fails, bump it up a bit, after you find a vcore that works with stock clocks run it on prime 95 to guarantee stability. The benefit to intel burn test is you can get an idea of how stable your system is in a short amount of time.
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October 22, 2013 5:53:32 PM

what about the rest such as cpu ring voltag, cpu ring frequency etc? Should I leavr those as autos
Alex19961130 said:
jaeyong92 said:
I use the program "MSI command Center" that came with my mobo to monitor the cpu voltage. Would that be unreliable too?

Alex19961130 said:
From my understanding monitoring your voltage from a piece of software such as CPU-Z is unreliable, it is always best to monitor your voltages through on-board voltage checkpoints. But in regards to your questions.

1- auto voltage is ok for stock cpu settings but is always best to set your vcore to a set number in the bios. I currently have a 4.5Ghz OC on my 2500k at 1.35V as a reference point, however i believe that my chip requires unusually high voltage.

2- I do not believe your cpu is faulty. 1.26V isnt a high voltage, thats actually quite low. A safe vcore would be up to 1.35V max in my opinion, 1.35 to 1.4 is somewhat safe but that would be reaching the point to where your cpu can start to degrade. And DO NOT go above 1.4.



Do as much of the work in the BIOS as you can. Because when you OC through windows there's all sorts of bugs and glitches that could go wrong ( had that happen to me with Gigabyte click bios). But MSI command center is still software so i wouldn't use it. Set the vcore manually and it should never go above the specified number. Start at lets say... 1.3, intel burn test it and if it passes, reduce vcore a bit, if it fails, bump it up a bit, after you find a vcore that works with stock clocks run it on prime 95 to guarantee stability. The benefit to intel burn test is you can get an idea of how stable your system is in a short amount of time.


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October 22, 2013 6:01:44 PM

jaeyong92 said:
what about the rest such as cpu ring voltag, cpu ring frequency etc? Should I leavr those as autos
Alex19961130 said:
jaeyong92 said:
I use the program "MSI command Center" that came with my mobo to monitor the cpu voltage. Would that be unreliable too?

Alex19961130 said:
From my understanding monitoring your voltage from a piece of software such as CPU-Z is unreliable, it is always best to monitor your voltages through on-board voltage checkpoints. But in regards to your questions.

1- auto voltage is ok for stock cpu settings but is always best to set your vcore to a set number in the bios. I currently have a 4.5Ghz OC on my 2500k at 1.35V as a reference point, however i believe that my chip requires unusually high voltage.

2- I do not believe your cpu is faulty. 1.26V isnt a high voltage, thats actually quite low. A safe vcore would be up to 1.35V max in my opinion, 1.35 to 1.4 is somewhat safe but that would be reaching the point to where your cpu can start to degrade. And DO NOT go above 1.4.



Do as much of the work in the BIOS as you can. Because when you OC through windows there's all sorts of bugs and glitches that could go wrong ( had that happen to me with Gigabyte click bios). But MSI command center is still software so i wouldn't use it. Set the vcore manually and it should never go above the specified number. Start at lets say... 1.3, intel burn test it and if it passes, reduce vcore a bit, if it fails, bump it up a bit, after you find a vcore that works with stock clocks run it on prime 95 to guarantee stability. The benefit to intel burn test is you can get an idea of how stable your system is in a short amount of time.




Sorry i cant answer that cause iv never heard of CPU ring voltage and CPU ring frequency:heink: . But all i can say is that in most cases all you need to focus on is your vcore and cpu ratio.
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