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Cooler Master Seidon 120V Anyone have an opinion?

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October 22, 2013 10:08:50 PM

I have just been looking at the Cooler Master Seidon 120V over the 212 evo which I was originally going to purchase. Its roughly the same price but looks wise it will be so much neater (Slightly OCD) but for some reason I cant find any reviews on the cooler at all, apart from a sound test on YouTube. If anyone out there that owns or has installed one in the past I would greatly appreciate any opinions you have, the good and the bad. I do plan to overclock a i5-4670K if that helps at all


Thank you, Mike.

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October 23, 2013 9:25:39 AM

I found one, they use FX8350 to test. And I try to find the 212evo review but all of them used the intel system so I can't compare them.
But from the review it does look similar or less performance to 212evo, also I found other forum someone use FX8350+212evo for OCing to 4.4 with 1.39V at 59C. 120V Ocing to 4.4 with 1.416V at 64C/65C.
Because if you use high voltage you will get high temp too.

I am not water cooler fan, if you use water cooler, you need check the system time to time in case it will leaking. I think just make it easy to use the air cooler. If you want water cooler maybe try other one.

120V review: http://dvtests.com/?p=14425
Other forum (Fx8350+212evo): http://www.overclock.net/t/1380992/fx-8350-59-c-with-a-...
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October 23, 2013 6:34:53 PM

cin19 said:

But from the review it does look similar or less performance to 212evo, also I found other forum someone use FX8350+212evo for OCing to 4.4 with 1.39V at 59C. 120V Ocing to 4.4 with 1.416V at 64C/65C.
Because if you use high voltage you will get high temp too.



Awesome thanks, I will just have to sacrifice looks for performance and considering I plan to overclock that seems sensible.

Thanks again, Mike.
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November 4, 2013 8:05:28 PM

MikeEOD said:
cin19 said:

But from the review it does look similar or less performance to 212evo, also I found other forum someone use FX8350+212evo for OCing to 4.4 with 1.39V at 59C. 120V Ocing to 4.4 with 1.416V at 64C/65C.
Because if you use high voltage you will get high temp too.



Awesome thanks, I will just have to sacrifice looks for performance and considering I plan to overclock that seems sensible.

Thanks again, Mike.


No, the Seidon 120V will perform better than the 212 EVO. Just find reviews of the Seidon 120M since it's only the pump that slightly differs, I doubt the performance will be different much from the seidon 120M. Also, you'd need more cooling for ocing' a 4670K than a 212 EVO. Note: AMD's CPUs are much easier to cool than Intel's even though they have a higher TDP because of Intel's shitty TIM.
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November 6, 2013 5:53:48 PM


Thank you for that advice, since this thread I Have gone with a hyper 212 evo for my FX 4170 rebuild im doing for the misses and a H60 2013 for my i7 4770k build. The H60 seems pretty solid and ive seen the results on a 4770k at 4.6ghz and its quite impressive.

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November 7, 2013 5:14:37 AM

MikeEOD said:

Thank you for that advice, since this thread I Have gone with a hyper 212 evo for my FX 4170 rebuild im doing for the misses and a H60 2013 for my i7 4770k build. The H60 seems pretty solid and ive seen the results on a 4770k at 4.6ghz and its quite impressive.



You're welcome! Yes, the H60 is a good watercooler but based on reviews the Seidon 120M is better than the H60 and again the 120V is just a revision of the 120M so it should perform around the same or better. Plus the 120V is cheaper! So I'll get the 120V if I we're you.
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November 11, 2013 10:42:43 AM

I am also looking for a water cooler I was told my case is a little too small to install a 240mm cooler and I would have to use a 120mm. The two coolers I checked out were the CM 120v and the Corsair H80i. I heard great reviews of the H80i, how it costs over double the price of the CM120v. I am running an fx8350 and do not want to overclock it very much as it runs fast enough at stock. However, I am wondering if the performance difference of the H80i justifies its hefty price difference.
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November 12, 2013 5:23:40 AM

chachee99 said:
I am also looking for a water cooler I was told my case is a little too small to install a 240mm cooler and I would have to use a 120mm. The two coolers I checked out were the CM 120v and the Corsair H80i. I heard great reviews of the H80i, how it costs over double the price of the CM120v. I am running an fx8350 and do not want to overclock it very much as it runs fast enough at stock. However, I am wondering if the performance difference of the H80i justifies its hefty price difference.


The H80i is better at cooling an more expensive than the 120V because it is a thicker style radiator while the 120V is a thinner radiator. The equivalent of the H80i from cooler master is the 120M (Cheaper), the equivalent of the 120V from corsair is the H60 (More expensive). For higher overclocks you cant use the 120V or H60 but you need the 120M or H80i. In the end it's up to you really. :) 
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November 22, 2013 12:33:01 AM

Unfortunately I have to strongly warn you away from the Seidon 120V.

I got one as a bundle deal with my CM690 III case, which meant I was paying about £20 for the cooler - seemed a good deal. At the same time as ordering parts for my new machine we upgraded my partner's machine, and he decided that he wanted the same cooler, so we ordered a second Seidon 120V for £39.

My parts arrived and I built my machine up, turned it on to be confronted with a loud grinding/growling noise from the pump. No end of shaking, changing orientations, etc could resolve it, but shaking the radiator resulted in sloshing noises - it sounds like it's about half-full of air.

My partner's seidon then arrived. No sloshing noises, and on installation and powering up it was quiet and effective. After an hour or two all of a sudden the fan on the radiator started to spin at full speed. A quick check of the system monitors showed why - the CPU temp was over 80C (no overclock).

The blue light on the Seidon block was on, but it turned out the pump had failed. The fan was going, the radiator was stone cold, the cpu and block were very hot.

When removing the seidon from his machine, it turned out not to have made spectacularly good contact with the cpu either (and no, not an installation error - I've been building/overclocking etc for over 15 years and am an electronic engineer by day. I know how to put a heatsink on, and how to follow instructions).

So, we are two out of two failures. My partner's seidon is on the way back for a refund, and an air cooler has been ordered to replace it. As for mine - the retailer doesn't carry the seidon alone, only the case bundle. Coolermaster can't be contacted as their web form doesn't work and there's no phone number, not even one the retailer can call them on.

I strongly recommend avoiding the Seidon 120V. It is not reliable and quality control is non existant. Even if coolermaster do eventually replace mine, can I ever trust it? Just buy a decent air cooler and save yourself the hassle and worry.
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November 22, 2013 12:51:15 AM

i-s said:
Unfortunately I have to strongly warn you away from the Seidon 120V.

I got one as a bundle deal with my CM690 III case, which meant I was paying about £20 for the cooler - seemed a good deal. At the same time as ordering parts for my new machine we upgraded my partner's machine, and he decided that he wanted the same cooler, so we ordered a second Seidon 120V for £39.

My parts arrived and I built my machine up, turned it on to be confronted with a loud grinding/growling noise from the pump. No end of shaking, changing orientations, etc could resolve it, but shaking the radiator resulted in sloshing noises - it sounds like it's about half-full of air.

My partner's seidon then arrived. No sloshing noises, and on installation and powering up it was quiet and effective. After an hour or two all of a sudden the fan on the radiator started to spin at full speed. A quick check of the system monitors showed why - the CPU temp was over 80C (no overclock).

The blue light on the Seidon block was on, but it turned out the pump had failed. The fan was going, the radiator was stone cold, the cpu and block were very hot.

When removing the seidon from his machine, it turned out not to have made spectacularly good contact with the cpu either (and no, not an installation error - I've been building/overclocking etc for over 15 years and am an electronic engineer by day. I know how to put a heatsink on, and how to follow instructions).

So, we are two out of two failures. My partner's seidon is on the way back for a refund, and an air cooler has been ordered to replace it. As for mine - the retailer doesn't carry the seidon alone, only the case bundle. Coolermaster can't be contacted as their web form doesn't work and there's no phone number, not even one the retailer can call them on.

I strongly recommend avoiding the Seidon 120V. It is not reliable and quality control is non existant. Even if coolermaster do eventually replace mine, can I ever trust it? Just buy a decent air cooler and save yourself the hassle and worry.


Dang, I was thinking of getting a Seidon 120v myself for my next build, and since it's itx i cant put a tower cooler, maybe I'll go with the Seidon 120XL or just scrape the entire itx idea and use an matx motherboard and case.
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November 22, 2013 12:23:44 PM

i-s said:
Unfortunately I have to strongly warn you away from the Seidon 120V.

I got one as a bundle deal with my CM690 III case, which meant I was paying about £20 for the cooler - seemed a good deal. At the same time as ordering parts for my new machine we upgraded my partner's machine, and he decided that he wanted the same cooler, so we ordered a second Seidon 120V for £39.

My parts arrived and I built my machine up, turned it on to be confronted with a loud grinding/growling noise from the pump. No end of shaking, changing orientations, etc could resolve it, but shaking the radiator resulted in sloshing noises - it sounds like it's about half-full of air.

My partner's seidon then arrived. No sloshing noises, and on installation and powering up it was quiet and effective. After an hour or two all of a sudden the fan on the radiator started to spin at full speed. A quick check of the system monitors showed why - the CPU temp was over 80C (no overclock).

The blue light on the Seidon block was on, but it turned out the pump had failed. The fan was going, the radiator was stone cold, the cpu and block were very hot.

When removing the seidon from his machine, it turned out not to have made spectacularly good contact with the cpu either (and no, not an installation error - I've been building/overclocking etc for over 15 years and am an electronic engineer by day. I know how to put a heatsink on, and how to follow instructions).

So, we are two out of two failures. My partner's seidon is on the way back for a refund, and an air cooler has been ordered to replace it. As for mine - the retailer doesn't carry the seidon alone, only the case bundle. Coolermaster can't be contacted as their web form doesn't work and there's no phone number, not even one the retailer can call them on.

I strongly recommend avoiding the Seidon 120V. It is not reliable and quality control is non existant. Even if coolermaster do eventually replace mine, can I ever trust it? Just buy a decent air cooler and save yourself the hassle and worry.


Damn glad I went for another option, thank you for your warning you potentially saved a few nightmares.

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November 23, 2013 3:47:52 AM

Thanks for the warning. I am probably going to go with the Noctura NHD14. Damn that's one huge air cooler!!!!!!!
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November 28, 2013 6:31:56 AM

In fairness to Coolermaster, I've eventually managed to get through to the right people and they are replacing my faulty bundled unit and they have made a genuine goodwill gesture as well. Hopefully they will make access to the right people a bit easier, but I got decent customer service in the end.
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December 7, 2013 2:53:41 PM

I have the 120V in my system running a i5-4670k OC to 4.2GHz and I must say its fine sits on idle at 40c normally and about 50c under load like BF4 highly recommend one as I have seen no problems.
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December 7, 2013 10:59:35 PM

My system is an i5-4670K also, although currently at 4.4GHz, although I've not pushed it yet - I seem to have a good example as I am at 1.125V and Idle in the low 30s dependant on room temp.

The Thermalright TS140 I bought as a stand-in for the Seidon actually achieved very similar temperatures to what the Seidon 120 is capable of - loading into the low 60s

My 3rd seidon arrived this week, and I bit the bullet and put it in. This one doesn't exhibit the extremely loud rattle that my first faulty unit did, and has not died yet. However, it does have a tendancy to make a soft rattling noise, and is generally noisier than the TS140.

I'll give it another couple of days, and if the rattle does not go then the TS140 will be going back in and the Seidon gets no more chances.

My experience is that for watercooling to provide a real performance advantage over air then you need a proper setup, even a kit like the XSPC Raystorm EX240. Otherwise it seems air cooling can provide as much performance as a 120mm AIO but with a lot less noise and greater reliability.
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January 3, 2014 7:12:42 AM

i-s said:
My system is an i5-4670K also, although currently at 4.4GHz, although I've not pushed it yet - I seem to have a good example as I am at 1.125V and Idle in the low 30s dependant on room temp.

The Thermalright TS140 I bought as a stand-in for the Seidon actually achieved very similar temperatures to what the Seidon 120 is capable of - loading into the low 60s

My 3rd seidon arrived this week, and I bit the bullet and put it in. This one doesn't exhibit the extremely loud rattle that my first faulty unit did, and has not died yet. However, it does have a tendancy to make a soft rattling noise, and is generally noisier than the TS140.

I'll give it another couple of days, and if the rattle does not go then the TS140 will be going back in and the Seidon gets no more chances.

My experience is that for watercooling to provide a real performance advantage over air then you need a proper setup, even a kit like the XSPC Raystorm EX240. Otherwise it seems air cooling can provide as much performance as a 120mm AIO but with a lot less noise and greater reliability.


Great! Update us on the Seidon 120V!
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January 3, 2014 8:16:11 AM

Ok then...

Below 40% pwm the pump rattles (commutation knock), above that it is smooth but gets noisy up at higher speeds. It is cooling the cpu, but no better than the big thermalright air heatsinks which are cheaper and more reliable.

Basically I am forced into the conclusion that 120mm aios are marginal in what they offer over decent air for a greater degree of complexity. I haven't taken it out because it is working, but seriously thinking about the xspc kit...

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January 22, 2014 6:04:39 PM

I have the CM seidon 120v on a fx 8320 oc'd to 4.6ghz (3.5ghz stock )and my max temp under full load again bf4 is 53.5℃ and 32℃ at idle
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February 17, 2014 10:24:03 PM

I have this cooler and i think it is great. picked it up from canada computers 30 bones off. Considering the original price was 60 that some pretty wild savings. The nice workers also sent me 8 long black bolts so i could hook up two fans right away(push pull is necessary), thanks CM guys. The only complaint i regularly hear is that of pump rattling. The pump has to be supplied with 12 volts of continuous power to operate properly(quietly). If it's under volted then it will rattle. try hooking it up to your power fan header that should pump 12 volts constantly. Short of that you will have to set the pumps header to 100% power in the bios.
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February 24, 2014 6:02:38 PM

I have this cooler as well and I'm having alot of difficulties with my CPU overheating. I'm around 35C at dle which I understand is normal but at ANY load even a simple game like CS:Source my temps jump up to around 70C. I can't run a stress test for even more than 3 minutes before getting up to temps as high as 100C and throttling my CPU. this is on a 4770K OCed to only 4Ghz.
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February 28, 2014 3:58:12 PM

lMlElRlKl said:
I have this cooler as well and I'm having alot of difficulties with my CPU overheating. I'm around 35C at dle which I understand is normal but at ANY load even a simple game like CS:Source my temps jump up to around 70C. I can't run a stress test for even more than 3 minutes before getting up to temps as high as 100C and throttling my CPU. this is on a 4770K OCed to only 4Ghz.


I have 120M and I think it's acceptable, but nothing great. One thing that is nice, you don't have to worry about air flow as much so you can make a quiet machine which I like. However, running my 4770k at 4.3G overclock I hit 85C or so using prime95 smallftt. IntelBurntest at high setting you can watch it hit 90C and throttle down. I resat it twice thinking it would be much better than air but maybe I was wrong. On a regular heavy load, though, you won't notice. On games I never hit 60 usually around 50ish so BF4 would run around that. It's definitely not that much better air imo.

I also tried three ways with the fan but didn't see much improvement on any of them (in/out and before/after the radiator). Hope others have better experience - maybe I did something wrong.

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May 21, 2014 1:29:35 PM

I just picked up one of these myself for the summer months for my i7 3770K (set it to 4.2GHz with -0.100v offset with LLC 2 for the warmer room temps) since I saw it on sale. Right now using a Hyper TX3 (92mm) which is fine in the winter (room temp is normally 18C).
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