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HTPC Build/Configuration Help

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October 28, 2013 1:00:22 PM

Hello, I have built a few PCs over the years but never an HTPC. So basically I am looking to see what all goes into it besides what I have researched and discovered so far. First I will list the parts I currently own that will go into the PC, then the parts I wish to purchase, lastly my budget.

This will be an HTPC build to be used with an 55-60 inch LED TV (I will be purchasing on Black Friday.

I want to to view Comcast cable, watch netflix, record shows, play music, access the internet, play ripped movies via VLC etc. My budget for the PC is around $200-$400. Any help regarding software, configurations etc it greatly appreciated. I will also want to be able to view the recorded shows/cabel on other TVs in the house (2 to be exact) from what I read this is possible but I do not understand how. I would like to do so wirelessly.

The build:

AMD Athlon IIx4 651k 3.0GHZ cpu
Gigabyte A55-DS2 mobo
Radeon 6770 Video Card
4 GB of Ram
1 TB of storage.
Corsair CX 430M PSU
My plan is to customize a PS1/ PS 2N64 case to accomodate the rig, (basically cutting out the bottom mount of my atx case. If that doesnt work a case suggestion would be appreciated.

Parts I have been looking at:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... (Ceton InfiniTV PCI-e)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA2R4... (usb antenna wifi)- i assume that this is what i need. I do not need to wirelessly stream music just the cable to every tv I want.

Thank you in advance
October 28, 2013 1:11:44 PM

For the last 2 years, I have utilized an HTPC as my primary DVR for Timer Warner Cable. The initial configuration of the system is always the most difficult. Running full HD video on a large screen TV produces the 29/59 effect (you will see flickering of the channels). The end result - I now use an XBox360 for my 60" Plasma TV (using Windows Media Center on PC), and made the gear part of my network.

I am using the SiliconDust HDHomerun Prime (3-tuner network tuner), I like the Ceton 6-tuner version....but it is twice the price (around $130 for the HDHomerun and $299 for the Ceton).

If you have Windows 7 media center is included, Windows 8 has a nominal charge ($30 if I remember).

The XBox 360 allows everything you mentioned above, and since my HTPC is hidden in the bedroom (utilized on a 32" 720p TV), I don't have the bulk issues or the problems of the 29/59 issue.

I tried several configurations, and the XBox works best for TV viewing - you can stream HD video wirelessly (if you are willing to deal with occasional stuttering of the video), but wired works best. The WMC remote is available almost everywhere for $20.
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October 28, 2013 1:23:49 PM

I have Windows 7 on the PC I am planning to use. How do I convert the Xbox into a streaming device. I keep reading it requires a lot of software.
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October 29, 2013 12:10:50 PM

Windows 7 with Media Center allows for "Media Center Extenders" - which includes the XBox360. You simply connect, enter a code, and the Media Center Software will allow you to play TV, movies, pictures and audio tracks on the TV through the XBox. It is very simple to connect them.
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October 29, 2013 12:28:02 PM

The Ceton I was speaking of is $199, plus I really do not want another piece of hardware if I will already have to HTPC i think I am going to go with the Ceton 4 tuner for $171.00 from Amazon used.
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October 29, 2013 12:54:10 PM

The Ceton Media Center extender is new to the market, and from what I read, there were issues with it. I am not a huge fan of the XBox360, but it just plain works. With the upcoming release of the XBox One, I bet you will be able to pick up used XBox 360 units cheap.

The Ceton tuner works well - the only draw back to having an internal unit will be head dissipation - they do run hot, so small boxes with poor ventilation may create issues. I prefer the network tuners, as any PC can watch live TV on the network without dedicating a tuner to that device.
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October 29, 2013 4:16:30 PM

ronintexas said:
The Ceton Media Center extender is new to the market, and from what I read, there were issues with it. I am not a huge fan of the XBox360, but it just plain works. With the upcoming release of the XBox One, I bet you will be able to pick up used XBox 360 units cheap.

The Ceton tuner works well - the only draw back to having an internal unit will be head dissipation - they do run hot, so small boxes with poor ventilation may create issues. I prefer the network tuners, as any PC can watch live TV on the network without dedicating a tuner to that device.


I apologize that came off wrong...I will be using an Xbox 360 already own and purchasing another for the additional tv. I mainly want the iternal cable card reader to utilize the HTPC to its max. Lightgaming, viewing stored content and recording shows
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October 30, 2013 1:03:38 PM

Your rig should work out - I have found that you need 1.5 cores/threads and about 2GB of RAM for each simultaneous stream of HD video - so with a 4 tuner setup, I would recommend at least 6GB of RAM (I am currently running 8GB with 3 streams), your processor might be pushed running 4 simultaneous streams of HD video. If you are only watching/recording 3 at a time, it should do great.

Last - you want to make sure you are running SATA II or SATA III drives to keep, 7200 RPM drives if you plan on going 4 streams at once. I run SATA II 7200 for 3 without any issues.

I have had my eye on the 6-tuner version from CETON....but I really like new toys. I rarely utilize all 3 tuners. The biggest advantage to having the internal card is going to be network utilization, as only outgoing to the XBOX will be on the network.

When you get setup - you will probably need a switched digital video adapter (the cable company knows this as a "TIVO box"), so you can watch/record all the channels and a cable card. The frustrating part of getting the system running is getting someone on the tech support line from the cable company that knows what they are doing. Once it is authorized, it works great.

And the best thing - I save $39.95 for the first tv, and $19.95 for each additional TV per month ($39.95 if you have DVR on additional TVs).
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October 30, 2013 1:23:19 PM

ronintexas said:
Your rig should work out - I have found that you need 1.5 cores/threads and about 2GB of RAM for each simultaneous stream of HD video - so with a 4 tuner setup, I would recommend at least 6GB of RAM (I am currently running 8GB with 3 streams), your processor might be pushed running 4 simultaneous streams of HD video. If you are only watching/recording 3 at a time, it should do great.

Last - you want to make sure you are running SATA II or SATA III drives to keep, 7200 RPM drives if you plan on going 4 streams at once. I run SATA II 7200 for 3 without any issues.

I have had my eye on the 6-tuner version from CETON....but I really like new toys. I rarely utilize all 3 tuners. The biggest advantage to having the internal card is going to be network utilization, as only outgoing to the XBOX will be on the network.

When you get setup - you will probably need a switched digital video adapter (the cable company knows this as a "TIVO box"), so you can watch/record all the channels and a cable card. The frustrating part of getting the system running is getting someone on the tech support line from the cable company that knows what they are doing. Once it is authorized, it works great.

And the best thing - I save $39.95 for the first tv, and $19.95 for each additional TV per month ($39.95 if you have DVR on additional TVs).


I can afford a few upgrades, I was already looking at getting the Bitfenix Prodigy M case since I do not want a Mid ATX case in my living room. At least the Bitfenix looks cool and kind of like a humidifier. I will probably only ever watch live tv on 2 tvs and record. My wife is an ER nurse, I work full time and go to school for my MBA at night. Basically we rarely have time to catch the prime time tv shows, But we do not want to pay for 2 DVRs. Hence the HTPC. Your information has been very beneficial. Especially the Xbox 360 I picked up one for $35 today, replaced the dvd drive. So now it can also watch movies.

Thanks, I hope that if I have any questions I can private message or just post back to this link. Thanks again.
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October 30, 2013 2:22:29 PM

I will try to answer :-) Good luck with the build. You can send me a PM or post here.
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January 15, 2014 4:51:58 AM

Hey Ronin, told ya I would upgrade...wanted to let you know after months of pondering (I love new things but hate spending money so sometimes it takes me awhile lol). I decided to go with the HD Homerun Prime.

After our conversation I set up WMC, on the HTPC mention at the start of the thread. I also grabbed an old Xbox 360 I had (dvd tray wont open :D ) but it works. I just purchased the HDHR Prime today for $100 couldnt pass up that deal.

So when I get it Ill hit you up with any issues I have if the SD forums, research I have already done doesnt work out. From what I keep reading it really seems as if you are at the mercy of the cable company. But evidently (Comcast) my cable company has a webpage to pair your device. IMO still 50/50. We shall see, rarely do I not run into challenges when it comes to PCs and Networking.

I wanted to pick your brain on something though, although the problem has subsided with my router upgrade to a dual band.

Sometimes when streaming to the Xbox I get a pretty good delay, I would say about a minute, for it to upload my videos and tv shows (not recorded since I dont have the HDHR yet ones I have ripped from my personal collection).

Will this get worse with the HDHR, since I know it will have to upload a guide and channels?

Also how did you set up your recorded shows folder to be accessed by WMC? I have tried others suggestions, and even placed it in the folder, but shows that I have ripped dont show up there. I would love it if they did so that all of my TV shows were in one place.

Right now I have them set up in a TV Shows folder in Videos, by Show>Season>Episode>Video, recently with other ripped seasons I have changed it to just be Show>Season>Episode-Video to cut out the extra folder.

Any tips will help man, keep representing Texas yo! I was born and raised in Cypress, TX (right outside of Houston) but moved to PA for a job. I miss it everyday.
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January 15, 2014 8:30:41 AM

WMC only accesses the root folder for recording - they don't like sub-folders for anything....this includes music, pictures, videos, movies and recorded TV.

I have a single drive dedicated (2TB) for recording TV shows, a 2TB drive for movies, videos, etc, and the music/pictures are actually stored on computers throughout the house (you can select shared and find them).

The HDHR does use quite a bit of bandwidth, but not a terrible amount. If I am recording 3 HD programs at the same time, and streaming 2 HD channels out, I have issues - but with 5 HD streams - I believe it to be hard disk related, not network related.

Your solution for placing ripped TV shows in the videos folder is the best solution....

While you are waiting to get your HDHR - call the cable company, and tell them you have purchased a "TIVO DVR", and will you need the "adapter" or just the cable card. This "adapter" is the SDV (Switched Digital Video) adapter - made by Cisco - here is info on it: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/video/ps9159...

You will probably have to travel to the cable company's office to pickup the tuning adapter and the cable card. Have those ready when you get the HDHR....you will need them.
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January 15, 2014 8:43:38 AM

ronintexas said:
WMC only accesses the root folder for recording - they don't like sub-folders for anything....this includes music, pictures, videos, movies and recorded TV.

I have a single drive dedicated (2TB) for recording TV shows, a 2TB drive for movies, videos, etc, and the music/pictures are actually stored on computers throughout the house (you can select shared and find them).

The HDHR does use quite a bit of bandwidth, but not a terrible amount. If I am recording 3 HD programs at the same time, and streaming 2 HD channels out, I have issues - but with 5 HD streams - I believe it to be hard disk related, not network related.

Your solution for placing ripped TV shows in the videos folder is the best solution....

While you are waiting to get your HDHR - call the cable company, and tell them you have purchased a "TIVO DVR", and will you need the "adapter" or just the cable card. This "adapter" is the SDV (Switched Digital Video) adapter - made by Cisco - here is info on it: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/video/ps9159...

You will probably have to travel to the cable company's office to pickup the tuning adapter and the cable card. Have those ready when you get the HDHR....you will need them.


Bandwith with I dont think will be a concern dual band router 300mbps/300mbps, my plan was to have to HDHR on its on its on width w/ the 360 extender ( i dont play Xbox live) going to wait and see if the 2.4ghz or 5 ghz is the better channel for this.

@ TV shows darn guess I can dream but I am getting used to accessing the TV shows via Video Library. I like to keep my movies separate. Currently I have a close setup to you but majority of my music is on my Gaming rig, but shared and read/write capabilities with every piece of hardware in the house.

Right now we have 2 32inches (potential 1 more in the near future 60 in+) and I stream to my Surface Tablet. I dont think that 5 HD streams will ever be a problem since we hardly have time for TV hence me doing this. On Demand from Comcast is terrible and My wife is not set on ditching cable yet.

Thanks for the TiVO DVR tip I kept searching around to see if I needed that adapter and I couldnt find anything concrete. Plus I wanted to make sure if I asked for those things they wouldnt cut off my cable now. I am going to call them at lunch and I will update this thread for future searches if the adapter is in fact needed for comcast.

My next goal is a NAS setup that will store all movies, music TV shows etc. So for now I think I will limit my HTPC to 2 TBs. As it is in a Prodigy M and it already runs hot during video conversions. Ill update ya after I talk to these cable folks. HDHR is coming from NJ to PA so I should have by tomorrow or friday :D 


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January 15, 2014 8:44:54 AM

ronintexas said:
WMC only accesses the root folder for recording - they don't like sub-folders for anything....this includes music, pictures, videos, movies and recorded TV.

I have a single drive dedicated (2TB) for recording TV shows, a 2TB drive for movies, videos, etc, and the music/pictures are actually stored on computers throughout the house (you can select shared and find them).

The HDHR does use quite a bit of bandwidth, but not a terrible amount. If I am recording 3 HD programs at the same time, and streaming 2 HD channels out, I have issues - but with 5 HD streams - I believe it to be hard disk related, not network related.

Your solution for placing ripped TV shows in the videos folder is the best solution....

While you are waiting to get your HDHR - call the cable company, and tell them you have purchased a "TIVO DVR", and will you need the "adapter" or just the cable card. This "adapter" is the SDV (Switched Digital Video) adapter - made by Cisco - here is info on it: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/video/ps9159...

You will probably have to travel to the cable company's office to pickup the tuning adapter and the cable card. Have those ready when you get the HDHR....you will need them.


Bandwith with I dont think will be a concern dual band router 300mbps/300mbps, my plan was to have to HDHR on its on its on width w/ the 360 extender ( i dont play Xbox live) going to wait and see if the 2.4ghz or 5 ghz is the better channel for this.

@ TV shows darn guess I can dream but I am getting used to accessing the TV shows via Video Library. I like to keep my movies separate. Currently I have a close setup to you but majority of my music is on my Gaming rig, but shared and read/write capabilities with every piece of hardware in the house.

Right now we have 2 32inches (potential 1 more in the near future 60 in+) and I stream to my Surface Tablet. I dont think that 5 HD streams will ever be a problem since we hardly have time for TV hence me doing this. On Demand from Comcast is terrible and My wife is not set on ditching cable yet.

Thanks for the TiVO DVR tip I kept searching around to see if I needed that adapter and I couldnt find anything concrete. Plus I wanted to make sure if I asked for those things they wouldnt cut off my cable now. I am going to call them at lunch and I will update this thread for future searches if the adapter is in fact needed for comcast.

My next goal is a NAS setup that will store all movies, music TV shows etc. So for now I think I will limit my HTPC to 2 TBs. As it is in a Prodigy M and it already runs hot during video conversions. Ill update ya after I talk to these cable folks. HDHR is coming from NJ to PA so I should have by tomorrow or friday :D 


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January 15, 2014 8:44:55 AM

ronintexas said:
WMC only accesses the root folder for recording - they don't like sub-folders for anything....this includes music, pictures, videos, movies and recorded TV.

I have a single drive dedicated (2TB) for recording TV shows, a 2TB drive for movies, videos, etc, and the music/pictures are actually stored on computers throughout the house (you can select shared and find them).

The HDHR does use quite a bit of bandwidth, but not a terrible amount. If I am recording 3 HD programs at the same time, and streaming 2 HD channels out, I have issues - but with 5 HD streams - I believe it to be hard disk related, not network related.

Your solution for placing ripped TV shows in the videos folder is the best solution....

While you are waiting to get your HDHR - call the cable company, and tell them you have purchased a "TIVO DVR", and will you need the "adapter" or just the cable card. This "adapter" is the SDV (Switched Digital Video) adapter - made by Cisco - here is info on it: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/video/ps9159...

You will probably have to travel to the cable company's office to pickup the tuning adapter and the cable card. Have those ready when you get the HDHR....you will need them.


Bandwith with I dont think will be a concern dual band router 300mbps/300mbps, my plan was to have to HDHR on its on its on width w/ the 360 extender ( i dont play Xbox live) going to wait and see if the 2.4ghz or 5 ghz is the better channel for this.

@ TV shows darn guess I can dream but I am getting used to accessing the TV shows via Video Library. I like to keep my movies separate. Currently I have a close setup to you but majority of my music is on my Gaming rig, but shared and read/write capabilities with every piece of hardware in the house.

Right now we have 2 32inches (potential 1 more in the near future 60 in+) and I stream to my Surface Tablet. I dont think that 5 HD streams will ever be a problem since we hardly have time for TV hence me doing this. On Demand from Comcast is terrible and My wife is not set on ditching cable yet.

Thanks for the TiVO DVR tip I kept searching around to see if I needed that adapter and I couldnt find anything concrete. Plus I wanted to make sure if I asked for those things they wouldnt cut off my cable now. I am going to call them at lunch and I will update this thread for future searches if the adapter is in fact needed for comcast.

My next goal is a NAS setup that will store all movies, music TV shows etc. So for now I think I will limit my HTPC to 2 TBs. As it is in a Prodigy M and it already runs hot during video conversions. Ill update ya after I talk to these cable folks. HDHR is coming from NJ to PA so I should have by tomorrow or friday :D 


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January 15, 2014 11:35:41 AM

If you are using the built in wireless on the XBox - it is only 2.4ghz - the USB adapter has two versions - one a single 2.4ghz and the other dual band 2.4ghz/5ghz. I was streaming wireless for a while, but you will get "hiccups" unless you are extremely close to the router, and there is no interference. My XBox was physically 20 feet from the router, going through a single wall. Signal strength indicated maximum, but every 10-15 minutes, I would get a "network issue" that glitched the playback. Wired, this will still happen, but maybe every 4-6 hours (some days it never happens, others, 1-2 times a day).

With cable card tuners - Comcast and other providers do not have two-way cards - meaning that you will be able to tune all channels on the digital TV tiers including HBO, SHO, CIN, etc....however - you can't do the On Demand....

TWC has an app for the XBOX - I think it truly sucks....hopefully Comcast is better.....
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January 16, 2014 4:29:45 AM

HDHR is on delivery truck as I type this. Picked up the cable card yesterday guess I shall see tonight. Is there a specific order I should do this in. I read that I should install the HDHR software> HDHR, scan> insert cable card> pair with provider.
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January 16, 2014 6:57:28 AM

I did an initial install without the cable card, did the firmware updates, etc....then installed the cable card. I needed the Cisco SDV adapter (missing a bunch of stations - this will be obvious if you need it). Tell the Cable Company you have a Tivo box....make it easier....
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January 16, 2014 7:09:51 AM

ronintexas said:
I did an initial install without the cable card, did the firmware updates, etc....then installed the cable card. I needed the Cisco SDV adapter (missing a bunch of stations - this will be obvious if you need it). Tell the Cable Company you have a Tivo box....make it easier....


Yeah when I went in there I asked for the cable card and adapter for a Tivo box. Guy said I didnt need the adapter. Imma do a quick search but like I said previously I got mixed information on whether it was actually needed for comcast anymore.
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January 16, 2014 7:14:56 AM

There is two types of digital cable they use, and depending upon available bandwidth in the area, they either send all channels (no SDV adapter required) or they send a percentage of the channels all the time, and use the SDV adapter to "switch" stations (i.e. channel 233 is normally history channel, but CNN doesn't have an assigned channel, so they switch the history channel and CNN - CNN now uses channel 233). There is a lot more to it than that....but it gives you the basic idea.

It all depends upon who is using the transmission cables, if they are shared or exclusive, etc....
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January 16, 2014 7:20:51 AM

Closest information I got was from 2012 and it said that Comcast did a trial run of SDV in some areas. I asked him specifically if they used switched digital video and he said no. I live in Lancaster, PA pop. 75k so I would assume if Comcast is utilizing SDV my area would be one of the last ones to get it. We shall see I am not ditching my CC boxes today so if not all of the channels show up I can order the SDV adapter.

But according to most of the forums it (comcast specifically) it says they dont use them. And they dont provide the adapters at this time, but TWC and Brighthouse does.
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January 16, 2014 8:47:05 AM

You may be a lucky one - the SDV adapters tend to slow the tuning of channels, and they are another device that has to be rebooted on occasion.

I built my HTPC, and tested it for 2-3 weeks before I yanked the cable boxes....last thing I wanted was my wife pissed off at me because she couldn't watch her favorite show....
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January 17, 2014 6:29:25 AM

For future reference on those setting up HD Homerun Prime with Comcast here is what happened.

1) Downloaded HD Homerun Prime Software on PCs
2) On the Silicon Dust Website after you download the software, go to Support<Instructions follow the Cablecard setup, tricky part to access your status page, from the HD Homerun Setup Screen, not the Config GUI click on one of the tuners hyperlinks.
4) Keep that status page open, when it says refresh, refresh your browser not the REFRESH hyper link.
5) If when you picked up your cablecard the didnt give you the self installation instructions DEMAND them. They should have but dont depend on that. Call the number listed (if you dont have the number I will post here later on)
6) Dont let the tech off the phone unil it says Card Authentication: Activated.
8) Digital Cable Advisor in Windows Media Center (from here on referred to as WMC)
9) Continue to follow the Instructions on Silicon Dust for setting up WMC.

What happened to me was this in case it happens to anyone else took me 30 minutes to figure out what they did.

Basically, I was only receiving 2 channels after running scan, evidently I didnt get paired correct my OOB and another acronym I think VCT were too low.

I called Tier 2 Tech support (btw I got the direct extension to an awesome support specialist).

She sent deactivated and then reactivated my CableCard, presto over 350+ channels :D .

It wasnt as bad as people have forums have stated.

HD Homerun kills your bandwidth you were right Ronin, and it doesnt run on 5GHZ as you stated, sucks is my laptop doesnt pick up the channel neither wish I could backroll it to 2.4GHZ. Maybe I can I will have to look it up, anyways I am going to connect my old Netgear Router under a different IP for another access point on my wireless tvs.

That way when I want to watch TV, just connect to the TV network, when I dont feel like crawling speeds connect to the Internet only network, should work in theory. But I will have to see.

Thanks for all of your help Ronin, btw a PS3 also picks up HD Homerun but no channel guide just channels so its kinda old school. Have to look up a TV guide lol. Oh and you cant record from the PS3 so I will have my PS3 upstairs after I purchase my new TV, probably get one of those Xbox 360s slims used on Craigslist or something. Keep that in the living rooms, and I have everything except my Windows Surface connected to the HD Homerun. Things went smoothly. Took me 2-3 hours to get everything setup
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January 17, 2014 7:24:53 AM

The HDHR runs on wired ethernet - and connects directly to any PC running WMC. XBox 360s act as a WMC extender - so the guide runs on the XBox360s. WMC is currently the only application to give you the "full experience" of program guide, recording, etc....

All other devices have DLNA connectivity - which means you can see "folders" for the channel and "tune" that channel by selecting the folder. It works....but not nearly as nice as WMC.

For the connectivity - the XBox built in WI-FI is 2.4GHZ - your laptop should be able to connect via 5GHZ to a router/access point, and have connectivity to with WMC. If you purchase the external WI-FI adapter for the XBox - it will run on 5GHZ.

From my experience - it is best to have a plain-jane switch (not managed) with connectivity upstream to your wired network, with the HDHR and primary HTPC connected on the switch. This is where you should do your "recording". WMC allows for up to 5 devices to be connected as extenders (I use 2 XBox360s), both wired using the house wiring (not connected to the plain-jane switch).

For optimum performance - have the HTPC as a "server" where you don't watch TV - it just serves the signal to XBox360s. The XBox360 has great HD graphics, and works well with all monitor sizes, resolutions and refresh rates. And it doesn't have the 29/59 problems the PCs do.
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January 17, 2014 7:58:42 AM

ronintexas said:
The HDHR runs on wired ethernet - and connects directly to any PC running WMC. XBox 360s act as a WMC extender - so the guide runs on the XBox360s. WMC is currently the only application to give you the "full experience" of program guide, recording, etc....

All other devices have DLNA connectivity - which means you can see "folders" for the channel and "tune" that channel by selecting the folder. It works....but not nearly as nice as WMC.

For the connectivity - the XBox built in WI-FI is 2.4GHZ - your laptop should be able to connect via 5GHZ to a router/access point, and have connectivity to with WMC. If you purchase the external WI-FI adapter for the XBox - it will run on 5GHZ.

From my experience - it is best to have a plain-jane switch (not managed) with connectivity upstream to your wired network, with the HDHR and primary HTPC connected on the switch. This is where you should do your "recording". WMC allows for up to 5 devices to be connected as extenders (I use 2 XBox360s), both wired using the house wiring (not connected to the plain-jane switch).

For optimum performance - have the HTPC as a "server" where you don't watch TV - it just serves the signal to XBox360s. The XBox360 has great HD graphics, and works well with all monitor sizes, resolutions and refresh rates. And it doesn't have the 29/59 problems the PCs do.


Thanks for bringing that up I almost forgot, when I ran the TV Signal install it told me that my Xbox was not efficient enough to run HD. Is this because it is a first gen 360?

By plain jain switch do you mean a gigabit switch or just a regular switch. Link would be helpful. I may have to do that later I really didnt want the HTPC as a server, I wanted to do stuff on it. I can whip up a server though I have spare parts lying around. so that it could feed the signal to the HTPC.

For that though it wouldnt have to be the same specs as the HTPC right?

What I have is an AMD A4 APU
FM1 Mobo,
250GB SSD or 320GB HDD
4 GB Ram
rest of it is irrelevant would this be enough for a server?
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January 17, 2014 8:22:57 AM

Just about any dual-core or better CPU (quad core AMD or Core i3 or better is best), 4GB RAM, and at least SATA II drives, recommended 7200RPM drive) is plenty for most things you can throw at it.

I went out and purchased an XBox to display on the TV, and worked well, so I purchased a 2nd. I have seen them for $149 around town now. The remote makes changing channels easier is $18-$20.

Any GB switch (as long as it isn't managed) will work this is what I use: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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