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SSD's in RAID 0 vs Single SSD

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November 2, 2013 9:27:21 PM

I am building a PC and am stuck on deciding how to set up my SSD's. I plan on getting one or more Neutron GTXs and I was wondering how I should set them up to maximize speed. Should I set them up in RAID 0 (with an HDD backup) or grab a higher capacity single SSD?

More about : ssd raid single ssd

November 2, 2013 9:47:47 PM

MauveCloud said:
I suggest you start by reading the table here:
http://www.adaptec.com/en-us/_common/compatibility/_edu...
and then the descriptions above it. That should help you decide what RAID level(s) to use.

For advice on which drives to get, it would help to know your budget.


I don't want to spend more than 225$ per drive. Thank you for the chart, but my question was more "RAID 0 or single drive" performance.
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a b G Storage
November 2, 2013 9:59:46 PM

RAID 0 will give you about twice the performance of a single drive, but only in drive-intensive tasks (such as level loading in games). It won't make any difference to your framerate when gaming, and probably won't be noticeable when just web-surfing. It also gives roughly twice the chance of failure (because if one of the drives goes down, the array becomes unusable; it's not exactly double the probability, but close enough), and will actually slow down bootup, because it has to check the status of the drives and give you time to press a key to adjust the RAID configuration.

At that budget, I'd suggest this for the ssd:
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/samsung-internal-hard-driv...
and this for the hdd:
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/seagate-internal-hard-driv...
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November 3, 2013 10:23:36 AM

MauveCloud said:
RAID 0 will give you about twice the performance of a single drive, but only in drive-intensive tasks (such as level loading in games). It won't make any difference to your framerate when gaming, and probably won't be noticeable when just web-surfing. It also gives roughly twice the chance of failure (because if one of the drives goes down, the array becomes unusable; it's not exactly double the probability, but close enough), and will actually slow down bootup, because it has to check the status of the drives and give you time to press a key to adjust the RAID configuration.

At that budget, I'd suggest this for the ssd:
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/samsung-internal-hard-driv...
and this for the hdd:
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/seagate-internal-hard-driv...


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