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can i upgrade intel pentium processor(laptop)?

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November 2, 2013 10:51:40 PM

heres info about my laptop:

Processor: Intel(R) Pentium(R) CPU P6300 @ 2.27GHz (2 CPUs), ~2.3GHz
Memory: 4096MB RAM
Card name: Intel(R) HD Graphics
Manufacturer: Intel Corporation
Chip type: Intel(R) HD Graphics (Pentium)
Socket: PGA988


THANKS! :D 
a b à CPUs
November 4, 2013 3:49:32 AM

It depends on your laptop more than anything else as to whether or not it is physically possible, while the CPU is removable is is entirely possible that the heatsink holding it down may not be. In most cases it will be upgradable but laptops are made on a case by case basis.

Due to that is it advisable that you DO NOT upgrade a laptop CPU. The cooling system is designed to be able to cool that specific CPU and the heat that that CPU typically outputs. Usually an upgrade means more power at an increased TDP, which means it runs hotter and laptops have enough cooling issues at stock than to worry about adding more heat.

However if you really feel like upgrading the CPU, upgrades can theoretically consist of many CPU's that share the PGA998 socket such as the i3 330M, the i7 920XM and the i5 520M. However before upgrading I suggest double checking that the CPU you choose will work on your specific laptop, it's not uncommon that the some CPU's just plain don't work with certain laptops even though the CPU should be compatible based on socket

-Member of the Intel Response Squad http://bit.ly/IntelRally
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November 5, 2013 3:22:55 AM

Hazy125 said:
It depends on your laptop more than anything else as to whether or not it is physically possible, while the CPU is removable is is entirely possible that the heatsink holding it down may not be. In most cases it will be upgradable but laptops are made on a case by case basis.

Due to that is it advisable that you DO NOT upgrade a laptop CPU. The cooling system is designed to be able to cool that specific CPU and the heat that that CPU typically outputs. Usually an upgrade means more power at an increased TDP, which means it runs hotter and laptops have enough cooling issues at stock than to worry about adding more heat.

However if you really feel like upgrading the CPU, upgrades can theoretically consist of many CPU's that share the PGA998 socket such as the i3 330M, the i7 920XM and the i5 520M. However before upgrading I suggest double checking that the CPU you choose will work on your specific laptop, it's not uncommon that the some CPU's just plain don't work with certain laptops even though the CPU should be compatible based on socket

-Member of the Intel Response Squad http://bit.ly/IntelRally



Thanks for that! :D 

So, the problem is the heatsink sir? how would i know if the heatsink is not compatible with the new processor?

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Best solution

a b à CPUs
November 5, 2013 10:08:13 PM

dmac01 said:
Hazy125 said:
It depends on your laptop more than anything else as to whether or not it is physically possible, while the CPU is removable is is entirely possible that the heatsink holding it down may not be. In most cases it will be upgradable but laptops are made on a case by case basis.

Due to that is it advisable that you DO NOT upgrade a laptop CPU. The cooling system is designed to be able to cool that specific CPU and the heat that that CPU typically outputs. Usually an upgrade means more power at an increased TDP, which means it runs hotter and laptops have enough cooling issues at stock than to worry about adding more heat.

However if you really feel like upgrading the CPU, upgrades can theoretically consist of many CPU's that share the PGA998 socket such as the i3 330M, the i7 920XM and the i5 520M. However before upgrading I suggest double checking that the CPU you choose will work on your specific laptop, it's not uncommon that the some CPU's just plain don't work with certain laptops even though the CPU should be compatible based on socket

-Member of the Intel Response Squad http://bit.ly/IntelRally



Thanks for that! :D 

So, the problem is the heatsink sir? how would i know if the heatsink is not compatible with the new processor?



The heatsink may well be compatible, it probably is in terms of actually fitting as it should work with any CPU that fits into the socket. The issue is that it probably will not be able to cool any better CPU's because the more power you have in the CPU, the higher the TDP(Usually) which means there is too much heat for the heatsink to handle so your CPU will likely overheat. That being said, if the heat isn't a problem and you live in a cool area go for it. The CPU should throttle itself when it gets overly hot to stop any permanent damage, although you will have to deal with a very slow computer if the CPU does throttle itself
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