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When will the next gen Intel processors be released?

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November 7, 2013 11:46:40 AM

I know the Haswell I7 processors came out in June, 2013. What / when is the next gen coming out? Will there be much performance (speed) gain? I'm hoping to build my second desktop computer in the next 6 months or so.
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November 7, 2013 11:52:32 AM

As much as I have read Q4 of 2014. I wouldn't expect much of a performance increase as this is mainly a die shrink. Also we have not seen major advances in performance from intel since Sandy Bridge.
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November 7, 2013 12:13:45 PM

ImperialistMillitant said:
As much as I have read Q4 of 2014. I wouldn't expect much of a performance increase as this is mainly a die shrink. Also we have not seen major advances in performance from intel since Sandy Bridge.

Actually haswell was targeting laptops and such.
Which was a huge improvement, longer battery life and more.
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November 7, 2013 12:17:02 PM

vmN said:
ImperialistMillitant said:
As much as I have read Q4 of 2014. I wouldn't expect much of a performance increase as this is mainly a die shrink. Also we have not seen major advances in performance from intel since Sandy Bridge.

Actually haswell was targeting laptops and such.
Which was a huge improvement, longer battery life and more.


I have heard Broadwell will be the same, no? In which case it is unlikely to be a performance boost on Desktops. When it comes to games, I like to think most modern CPU's are perfectly capable. Intel will likely start focusing more on the mobile market due to the decline of desktops.
I may be wrong but this is what I have read thus far.
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November 7, 2013 12:19:27 PM

ImperialistMillitant said:
vmN said:
ImperialistMillitant said:
As much as I have read Q4 of 2014. I wouldn't expect much of a performance increase as this is mainly a die shrink. Also we have not seen major advances in performance from intel since Sandy Bridge.

Actually haswell was targeting laptops and such.
Which was a huge improvement, longer battery life and more.


I have heard Broadwell will be the same, no? In which case it is unlikely to be a performance boost on Desktops. When it comes to games, I like to think most modern CPU's are perfectly capable. Intel will likely start focusing more on the mobile market due to the decline of desktops.
I may be wrong but this is what I have read thus far.

The thing is, currently there cant be much improvement on CPU's. So they are making them smarter[Intel soon 12nm cpus], taking less power and such.
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November 7, 2013 12:30:48 PM

vmN said:
ImperialistMillitant said:
vmN said:
ImperialistMillitant said:
As much as I have read Q4 of 2014. I wouldn't expect much of a performance increase as this is mainly a die shrink. Also we have not seen major advances in performance from intel since Sandy Bridge.

Actually haswell was targeting laptops and such.
Which was a huge improvement, longer battery life and more.


I have heard Broadwell will be the same, no? In which case it is unlikely to be a performance boost on Desktops. When it comes to games, I like to think most modern CPU's are perfectly capable. Intel will likely start focusing more on the mobile market due to the decline of desktops.
I may be wrong but this is what I have read thus far.

The thing is, currently there cant be much improvement on CPU's. So they are making them smarter[Intel soon 12nm cpus], taking less power and such.


I have never really been motivated by power efficiency within a desktop, but it does come down to how much you use Your PC.

Hopefully in the Future Photo Electric CPU's might change everything, followed by quantum computing?
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November 7, 2013 12:34:27 PM

Due to problems with 14nm fabrication process Broadwell (a tweaked Haswell CPU) has been delayed. Originally intending to begin production in Q3 2013, Broadwell production is pushed back to Q1 2014. However, these are the "socket BGA" versions of Broadwell which means they are to be soldered into the motherboards for OEMs like HP and Dell. Intel's roadmap indicates that socket 1150 "Broadwell-K" CPUs will be released in Q4 2014. It is interesting that Intel's roadmap does not mention socket 1150 "non K version" Broadwell CPUs at all. After all, it is very unlikely every single socket 1150 Broadwell CPU coming off the production line will be qualified to be a "K" model CPU. Those that can't would typically be binned as lower model Broadwell CPUs.

The CPU performance is likely not increase very much since Intel has not mentioned a word about CPU perforance. The main goal is reduced power consumption and heat. The expectation is that Broadwell can be used in tablets without the need for a fan. Addtionally, iGPU performance may increase by as much as 40%, but it's too early to know what the performance increase will actually be.
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November 7, 2013 12:38:33 PM

jaguarskx said:
Due to problems with 14nm fabrication process Broadwell (a tweaked Haswell CPU) has been delayed. Originally intending to begin production in Q3 2013, Broadwell production is pushed back to Q1 2014. However, these are the "socket BGA" versions of Broadwell which means they are to be soldered into the motherboards for OEMs like HP and Dell. Intel's roadmap indicates that socket 1150 "Broadwell-K" CPUs will be released in Q4 2014. It is interesting that Intel's roadmap does not mention socket 1150 "non K version" Broadwell CPUs at all. After all, it is very unlikely every single socket 1150 Broadwell CPU coming off the production line will be qualified to be a "K" model CPU. Those that can't would typically be binned as lower model Broadwell CPUs.

The CPU performance is likely not increase very much since Intel has not mentioned a word about CPU perforance. The main goal is reduced power consumption and heat. The expectation is that Broadwell can be used in tablets without the need for a fan. Addtionally, iGPU performance may increase by as much as 40%, but it's too early to know what the performance increase will actually be.


Thank-you for clearing some information up for me.
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November 7, 2013 1:08:52 PM

Yes, thank you for noticing my question is in reference to a desktop build, where speed (and maybe reliability) is the issue. While I am glad everything is becomming more efficient from an environmental standpoint, in terms of computing I need as much processing power as possible. I often wait 20-30 minutes for my computer to crunch numbers (on my old Sandy Bridge build), so if I could cut that in half it would make sense for me to purchase a new computer.

ImperialistMillitant said:
As much as I have read Q4 of 2014. I wouldn't expect much of a performance increase as this is mainly a die shrink. Also we have not seen major advances in performance from intel since Sandy Bridge.


ImperialistMillitant said:
vmN said:
ImperialistMillitant said:
vmN said:
ImperialistMillitant said:
As much as I have read Q4 of 2014. I wouldn't expect much of a performance increase as this is mainly a die shrink. Also we have not seen major advances in performance from intel since Sandy Bridge.

Actually haswell was targeting laptops and such.
Which was a huge improvement, longer battery life and more.


I have heard Broadwell will be the same, no? In which case it is unlikely to be a performance boost on Desktops. When it comes to games, I like to think most modern CPU's are perfectly capable. Intel will likely start focusing more on the mobile market due to the decline of desktops.
I may be wrong but this is what I have read thus far.

The thing is, currently there cant be much improvement on CPU's. So they are making them smarter[Intel soon 12nm cpus], taking less power and such.


I have never really been motivated by power efficiency within a desktop, but it does come down to how much you use Your PC.

Hopefully in the Future Photo Electric CPU's might change everything, followed by quantum computing?


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November 7, 2013 1:11:17 PM

So, to be clear, I am still a full year away from being able to build a system with Broadwell cpu, and even then it likely won't be much faster than the current gen?

jaguarskx said:
Due to problems with 14nm fabrication process Broadwell (a tweaked Haswell CPU) has been delayed. Originally intending to begin production in Q3 2013, Broadwell production is pushed back to Q1 2014. However, these are the "socket BGA" versions of Broadwell which means they are to be soldered into the motherboards for OEMs like HP and Dell. Intel's roadmap indicates that socket 1150 "Broadwell-K" CPUs will be released in Q4 2014. It is interesting that Intel's roadmap does not mention socket 1150 "non K version" Broadwell CPUs at all. After all, it is very unlikely every single socket 1150 Broadwell CPU coming off the production line will be qualified to be a "K" model CPU. Those that can't would typically be binned as lower model Broadwell CPUs.

The CPU performance is likely not increase very much since Intel has not mentioned a word about CPU perforance. The main goal is reduced power consumption and heat. The expectation is that Broadwell can be used in tablets without the need for a fan. Addtionally, iGPU performance may increase by as much as 40%, but it's too early to know what the performance increase will actually be.


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November 7, 2013 1:11:46 PM

Jsplinter said:
Yes, thank you for noticing my question is in reference to a desktop build, where speed (and maybe reliability) is the issue. While I am glad everything is becomming more efficient from an environmental standpoint, in terms of computing I need as much processing power as possible. I often wait 20-30 minutes for my computer to crunch numbers (on my old Sandy Bridge build), so if I could cut that in half it would make sense for me to purchase a new computer.

ImperialistMillitant said:
As much as I have read Q4 of 2014. I wouldn't expect much of a performance increase as this is mainly a die shrink. Also we have not seen major advances in performance from intel since Sandy Bridge.


ImperialistMillitant said:
vmN said:
ImperialistMillitant said:
vmN said:
ImperialistMillitant said:
As much as I have read Q4 of 2014. I wouldn't expect much of a performance increase as this is mainly a die shrink. Also we have not seen major advances in performance from intel since Sandy Bridge.

Actually haswell was targeting laptops and such.
Which was a huge improvement, longer battery life and more.


I have heard Broadwell will be the same, no? In which case it is unlikely to be a performance boost on Desktops. When it comes to games, I like to think most modern CPU's are perfectly capable. Intel will likely start focusing more on the mobile market due to the decline of desktops.
I may be wrong but this is what I have read thus far.

The thing is, currently there cant be much improvement on CPU's. So they are making them smarter[Intel soon 12nm cpus], taking less power and such.


I have never really been motivated by power efficiency within a desktop, but it does come down to how much you use Your PC.

Hopefully in the Future Photo Electric CPU's might change everything, followed by quantum computing?




Which CPU? A jump from an i7 2600k to a i7 4770k will not cut your rendering time in half. The only way I can think of is to either for a Hex CPU if you have not already done so or xeons. Even then I doubt a Hex would cut Rendering by half. If your Precedent and target is 50% time cut in rendering for an upgrade, then I think its a no. At the moment Haswell only performs 15% better than Sandy, Far from 50% you want.
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November 7, 2013 1:22:47 PM

I have the 2600k. Got it when it first came out.

If it's only a 15% difference I'll probably wait. My processor budget is $300-$400, but if I can't get a big improvement for that price, I might do an economy build instead to bide my time until the next "tock."

"Which CPU? A jump from an i7 2600k to a i7 4770k will not cut your rendering time in half. The only way I can think of is to either for a Hex CPU if you have not already done so or xeons. Even then I doubt a Hex would cut Rendering by half. If your Precedent and target is 50% time cut in rendering for an upgrade, then I think its a no. At the moment Haswell only performs 15% better than Sandy, Far from 50% you want.

ImperialistMillitant has edited this post 1 minute ago
"
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November 7, 2013 1:26:44 PM

Jsplinter said:
I have the 2600k. Got it when it first came out.

If it's only a 15% difference I'll probably wait. My processor budget is $300-$400, but if I can't get a big improvement for that price, I might do an economy build instead to bide my time until the next "tock."

"Which CPU? A jump from an i7 2600k to a i7 4770k will not cut your rendering time in half. The only way I can think of is to either for a Hex CPU if you have not already done so or xeons. Even then I doubt a Hex would cut Rendering by half. If your Precedent and target is 50% time cut in rendering for an upgrade, then I think its a no. At the moment Haswell only performs 15% better than Sandy, Far from 50% you want.

ImperialistMillitant has edited this post 1 minute ago
"


That's what I would also do, sandy Bridge is excellent and you could always overclock for a little more performance. Defiantly stay with sandy.
Good luck

Also please pick a solution if you are satisfied to put the "Thread to Bed" (A rhyme)
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November 7, 2013 1:39:01 PM

You are likely not going to see a large performance increase with Broadwell. It may be another 6% average performance increase (same as Ivy Bridge and Haswell) which would work out to just an estimated 19% average increase in performance compared to a Sandy Bridge CPU running at the same clockspeed.

The hope is when Skylake is released in 2015 it would offer double digit performance increase; like 12%. But even that would mean only a 33% increase in performance vs. a Sandy Bridge generation CPU at the same clockspeed.

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November 7, 2013 1:50:57 PM

Intel is just chilling. IMO, it is about time to push the mainstream core count up a bit, as in 6-core I5/I7s' with a reasonable price tag, as it seems that performance-wise the single core of the "bridge" line of architecture is exhausted but it seems that Intel waits for AMD to pull out something that would justify this step, if at all.

Both Intel and AMD are now gunning for mobile market, so I'm afraid that HEDT area will be left out cold.
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