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Finding out what is causing my unusual internet latency increase in gaming and how to stop them?

Last response: in PC Gaming
November 8, 2013 5:47:25 AM

Alright, so I've been gaming for a while now. I'm not a hardcore gamer, but I do have a lot of demand when it comes to online gaming. Graphics should be decent yet fast enough, peripherals like the mouse, the keyboard, and the headphones should be well adjusted to my perspective, and--of course--internet connection should be right. However, I've seen some "recent" changes in the way my connections with my all-time favorite servers have been acting.

In the past, sometime in 2011-12, regional servers (in southeast asia) that I play on go as far as 50-60ms; which in my case is not all that bad. There were no hiccups, very limited time-outs... basically I had no worry. But within the process from those days to today, there were some changes from my side: I had a new computer, my ISP upgraded my network to something a bit higher, I got a free router from my ISP (which replaced the old one I had), and my grandma just got herself a new iPad and laptop. Now this year, regardless of the new stuff that came around, things haven't really been that good as expected. Nowadays, I get like 200-300ms on all my most visited servers, which is super bad even for an average gamer like myself. Now there are some thoughts that came to my mind about why my network services have become a tad poorer regardless of the upgrades.

#1 With the inclusion of my grandma getting hooked up into the internet, this is gonna be a problem for sharing what comes in and out of the router. At the moment, there are a total of 5 devices connected wirelessly: my laptop, my tablet, my phone, my grandma's iPad, and her laptop. Everytime I play I make sure to switch off my tablet and phone from the router. But my grandma, I have no power over. (yes, I play online wirelessly. My parents HATE cables)
OPINION: Should I go wired instead of joining in with the wireless? If so, how much would it drastically effect my latency? And is switching off other mobile devices' wifi help reduce the competition for data?

#2 The router came free from my upgrading to a slightly higher network plan with my ISP. From how it feels, it seems more fragile-looking; flimsier than the older router actually. I'm not sure if brands would be helpful in this, but if so my former router was from Linksys, bought in 2009. The current router is from D-Link, like I said it came free with the network service upgrade.
OPINION: So does this mean I have to switch routers? Because at the moment, I am super tempted to do so. My family and I have always been Linksys fanatics, and this is the only time we've used a router other than the said brand.

#3 My ISP's services have been neglected and I might have to think of moving to a different ISP instead.
OPINION: I'm guess this is a yes opinion? Unless of course, we start to think about the overhauling of the house's entire wiring system to refit it for the new ISP.

#4 Something's wrong with my computer's ability to connect online, or there's some programs within my computer that are hogging up the data.
OPINION: Is there a clear list of programs that I should shut down so they won't eat up my usage of the network? I'm using Windows 8, and I've gotta say there's like a ton of self-updating apps here that I don't know how to shut down. Also, we're talking about Windows here, modifying the firewall or the antivirus programs might just increase my chances of losing my computer altogether. But, I've seen opinions about stuff like these being modified to decrease latency.

#5 I've also been thinking of the issue coming from the servers themselves, not just from me. we're Southeast Asian server ok? We're not the best, but we do provide good enough service for everyone here.
OPINION: What type of changes do you think they might done that could cause this, if they did let's put it to that?

If neither should work, would this be suggested as well: http://mywindows8.org/reduce-latency-in-windows-8/

I appreciate all suggestions and responses. I will, of course, take all the time to read and understand each and every reply as to maximize every solution available. Thank you very much!

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Best solution

November 8, 2013 7:02:49 AM

I'm not sure in Windows 8 how to do it, but I would start with a command prompt and ping the IP address of the server you're trying to connect to. I would then do a trace route. See if the spike in ping and packet drops is happening right away or enroute to the server(s) in question.

The number of devices shouldn't matter in my opinion. Not unless they're all active and hoarding bandwidth.

Wired internet is ALWAYS the best solution for online gaming. I've found that when wired isn't an option powerline adapters work amazingly well.

If you are able to ping/traceroute and you find the problem is on your network I would start by troubleshooting the router.

Anti-virus programs can always cause problems. If you can temporarily disable the program to see how your connection reacts that is the next step I would take in troubleshooting (I might do that first since it is easier than troubleshooting the router)
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November 8, 2013 7:26:31 PM

ncasolo said:
I'm not sure in Windows 8 how to do it, but I would start with a command prompt and ping the IP address of the server you're trying to connect to. I would then do a trace route. See if the spike in ping and packet drops is happening right away or enroute to the server(s) in question.

The number of devices shouldn't matter in my opinion. Not unless they're all active and hoarding bandwidth.

Wired internet is ALWAYS the best solution for online gaming. I've found that when wired isn't an option powerline adapters work amazingly well.

If you are able to ping/traceroute and you find the problem is on your network I would start by troubleshooting the router.

Anti-virus programs can always cause problems. If you can temporarily disable the program to see how your connection reacts that is the next step I would take in troubleshooting (I might do that first since it is easier than troubleshooting the router)



How would I trace/ping my server using the cmd prompt? I'm guessing it's the same as Windows 7? But then again, I skipped 7 for a Mac when it was the latest windows so overall I don't know the process.

I'm always very attentive if I feel there's a sudden spike in my lag, I turn around to check if someone's using a tablet. I'll also get to setting up the wired connection straight away.

That's something I'm worried about: disabling the anti-virus. Like I said, I risk losing my computer overall just for a little boost in online gaming experience. So I'm searching for alternatives around this impediment. But I am very interested in learning how to ping a server, though. :) 

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November 12, 2013 7:20:20 AM

I don't even bother with anti-virus software on my gaming PC. Then again my web browsing on my gaming PC is pretty much non-existent. If you disable the software for troubleshooting you're not surfing the internet to risk getting a virus... If you find out that it is the source of the problem that's a different discussion. That said I don't have Anti-virus on my laptop either and by being smart about my web browsing I've never had problems.

As far as how to do a ping/trace route I don't know how to do it on Windows 7 or 8. XP/Vista was the last OS I knew how to do it on. in a command prompt type in ping (IP Address) or tracert (IP Address) you need to get the IP address of what you're trying to ping. The web URL sometimes works as well.
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November 13, 2013 4:55:15 AM

ncasolo said:
I don't even bother with anti-virus software on my gaming PC. Then again my web browsing on my gaming PC is pretty much non-existent. If you disable the software for troubleshooting you're not surfing the internet to risk getting a virus... If you find out that it is the source of the problem that's a different discussion. That said I don't have Anti-virus on my laptop either and by being smart about my web browsing I've never had problems.

As far as how to do a ping/trace route I don't know how to do it on Windows 7 or 8. XP/Vista was the last OS I knew how to do it on. in a command prompt type in ping (IP Address) or tracert (IP Address) you need to get the IP address of what you're trying to ping. The web URL sometimes works as well.


Alrighty then, I guess I could try that out just for one; to get as much of a result as possible. Are there other programs you might suggest I disable that could be eating up my internet? I might wanna start with my computer before I start thinking about the external problems like bad ISP service, weather, etc.
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November 13, 2013 5:12:54 AM

Frans97_Bords said:
ncasolo said:
I don't even bother with anti-virus software on my gaming PC. Then again my web browsing on my gaming PC is pretty much non-existent. If you disable the software for troubleshooting you're not surfing the internet to risk getting a virus... If you find out that it is the source of the problem that's a different discussion. That said I don't have Anti-virus on my laptop either and by being smart about my web browsing I've never had problems.

As far as how to do a ping/trace route I don't know how to do it on Windows 7 or 8. XP/Vista was the last OS I knew how to do it on. in a command prompt type in ping (IP Address) or tracert (IP Address) you need to get the IP address of what you're trying to ping. The web URL sometimes works as well.


Alrighty then, I guess I could try that out just for one; to get as much of a result as possible. Are there other programs you might suggest I disable that could be eating up my internet? I might wanna start with my computer before I start thinking about the external problems like bad ISP service, weather, etc.


The reality is any program COULD be the source of your problem. The liklihood of it being anything other than your firewall/anti-virus software is extremely low. I would google "how to ping a server in windows 8" and see if there are step by step instructions. Then do the same for the trace route. That'll really help you out because it will tell you if the problem is your problem or your internet service provider's problem.

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