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AMD vs. Nvidia for video editing

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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November 9, 2013 4:31:54 PM

Hi. In my current build (i7 4770k, gigabyte z87x-ud4h & 8gb RAM) I have one Sapphire 7950. I received a second one back in September, but have been unable to use it since I only have a 600W power supply. With the recent drop in price on the GTX 780s, I have been thinking about selling my 7950s and buying a 780 with the money from the 7950s and the money saved from not buying a new power supply.
As far as I know they are about the same when it comes to gaming in terms of frames per second (I use 2 1080p monitors and may pick up a 3rd) and I also know that the crossfired 7950's would consume much more power (I would prefer my electric bill not go up) and put out more heat.

My biggest question is which is better for video editing and video playback? I do quite a bit of video editing on my computer for work using Adobe premiere CC. I have been unable to find benchmarks anywhere online. I also have seen conflicting articles with some saying Open CL is faster and the others saying CUDA is faster. I also am wondering if Nvidia has anything that is equal to the video control settings in AMD's Catalyst Control Center (Color control, Quality control, AMD Steady Video, and Accelerated Video Conversion).

Hopefully one of you out there can help me out. If you have any other advice on crossfired 7950s vs one GTX 780 feel free to tell me. Thank you in advance!
a b ) Power supply
November 11, 2013 2:26:31 AM

This I have find.



And this.



SLI is not making any performance boost with Adobe. CF I do not know.

Both have controlls. They work about the same way. But it depends what u like to use what is better for you. I like more Nvidia.

Now with new R 9 290 (X) AMD can be good option too.

Hope this helps.

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November 11, 2013 2:42:26 AM
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Nvidia is the way to go if you edit with Adobe PP CC. They playback engine used within the software is Called the Mercury Engine and it works exclusively with CUDA cores. Notice the lack of AMD cards on the above users list.

So yes, it is Nvidia all the way. I might even add that the 780 is a bit of an overkill if you don't game at all on that machine - just trying to help your wallet mate.

More info on this: http://www.adobe.com/mena_en/products/premiere/mercury-...
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November 12, 2013 7:08:30 AM

seezed said:
Nvidia is the way to go if you edit with Adobe PP CC. They playback engine used within the software is Called the Mercury Engine and it works exclusively with CUDA cores. Notice the lack of AMD cards on the above users list.

So yes, it is Nvidia all the way. I might even add that the 780 is a bit of an overkill if you don't game at all on that machine - just trying to help your wallet mate.

More info on this: http://www.adobe.com/mena_en/products/premiere/mercury-...


Thank you! I do a good amount of gaming on this and on 2 monitors (eventually I might get a 3rd). In your opinion with gaming, which is more future proof, the crossfire 7950s or the 780. I heard AMD is coming out with this thing called Mantle which will greatly increase the performance of their cards but I do not know if that will make a huge difference compared to the 780
February 13, 2014 6:54:52 PM

From benchmarks on rendering that I've seen, AMD SPU's are about half as effective as NVidia SPUs (CUDA cores).

So take a look at how many SPUs each card have and weight accordingly.

eg R9 280X has 2048 SPU's and GTX 660 (not Ti) has 1152 SPUs (CUDA). But they both have about the same rendering power.
February 13, 2014 7:42:21 PM

For anything that is openCL based, AMD will dominate with the higher end cards, and the 290/290x in particular. Adobe CC already supports OpenGL for that mercury playback engine. CUDA is decreasing in popularity for most things, and OpenCL is becoming more popular. That being said, if what you use only uses CUDA, then you're kinda stuck.

I would go with an R9 290 or 290x over the crossfire 7950's. It will save you heat and power consumption, give you great performance now, and give you room to add a second one if you want to later.

Mantle basically (for now anyway) seems to just reduce CPU bottlenecking, with the largest performance increases coming from systems with lower end CPU's.
!