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Does RAID 1 back up everything (such as games) and how does using 1 harddrive as startup work?

I am currently building a PC. I am 14, doing chores, and saving up. I change the list as I go, and as the market goes. It's going to be a cross of gaming and some workstation (school work). I want extreme speeds. I am getting a 1TB caviar blue. It's 7200 RPM. I believe that's fast enough, but if I got a second harddrive, will that work to back up EVERYTHING (Wallpaper, games, folders, web browser and history, etfc.)? Also, how does using an SSD for booting up work?
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  1. That Caviar Blue is not fast at all. If you really want WB drive then go Black, though I recommend against WD at all. If you are really worried about back-up, just get a 24/7 rated drive, they are much more durable. Seagate Constellation for example. If you are so worried - then occasionally back up to an external drive.

    Else if you really want it real time - then you have to set up 2 drives in RAID 1. That means that 2 drives perform exactly the same operations. If 1 fails, you throw it out, disable the RAID function from bios and boot with only 1.

    SDD boot works easiest if you set it as a main drive, and, well yeah, that's it, full story.
  2. Best answer
    RAID is not a backup, it's for redundancy. A virus or accidental file deletion will effect RAID just as it does a single drive. I have had no problems with WD drives. I prefer the black. You can use an external drive to make backups to.
  3. Hawkeye22 said:
    RAID is not a backup, it's for redundancy. A virus or accidental file deletion will effect RAID just as it does a single drive. I have had no problems with WD drives. I prefer the black. You can use an external drive to make backups to.



    ^This^

    Also, an SSD will give you your fast boot times and program/game loads (hard drive speed will not effect your in game play). Caviar blacks seem like overkill if you intend to use them in RAID1. RAID1 will offer some redundancy but will hamper your speeds. RAID0 will offer increased speed but at the high risk of losing all of your data.

    If you intend to use your HDDs as storage drives, the speed of the drive will only come into play when accessing your data and moving it to other drives. If you have lots of small files, like millions of pictures, then you may be better off going for the fastest disk that you can.

    I use multiple arrays of WD Caviar Green 3TB HDDs in RAID1 to store various media files - pictures, movies, songs - by the thousands. I wait several seconds, like 10, for even my biggest folders to populate. It's only when I lots of small files or several large files to another HDD that the low disk speed becomes an issue. Even then, it's nothing to cry about. Even as I buy more HDD's, I still opt for greens simply because of the price.

    People make money off selling these things,and people make money by marketing them. Drives have a rated lifespan in hours. A 24/7 drive is nothing but a marketing ploy. My computer runs pretty much 24/7 and has done since I built it in 2011.
  4. Um, Szyrs, how much of that time from 2011 your HDDs have been heavily saturated. A 24/7 drive is not a marketing ploy, it is rated for 24/7 non-stop read-write operation during it's warranty. And if you did not have problems with WD, then god bless you and your luck. For every Seagate or old Hitachi (now Hitachi is owned by WD so I stopped buying them) I have 4 WD failed drives. And this is a comparison of drives in a comparable categories with similar prices.
    For the past 5 years (haven't bough WD since then) I haven't had a dead drive, except one Seagate Barracuda which died in a power surge.

    P.S a guy who renders close to 2 TB of data every week
  5. Shneiky said:
    Um, Szyrs, how much of that time from 2011 your HDDs have been heavily saturated. A 24/7 drive is not a marketing ploy, it is rated for 24/7 non-stop read-write operation during it's warranty. And if you did not have problems with WD, then god bless you and your luck. For every Seagate or old Hitachi (now Hitachi is owned by WD so I stopped buying them) I have 4 WD failed drives. And this is a comparison of drives in a comparable categories with similar prices.
    For the past 5 years (haven't bough WD since then) I haven't had a dead drive, except one Seagate Barracuda which died in a power surge.

    P.S a guy who renders close to 2 TB of data every week


    I buy 'em, fill 'em up and buy more. I add roughly 200-500GB per month and constantly use the full ones. I had the same approach to Seagate, my first few drives were all Seagate and they all failed, I haven't bought one since. I haven't had a single WD fail yet, greens, blues or laptop drives. I'm inclined to buy them because I haven't had failures and they cost exactly the same price. I'm not a die hard though, I see as much fanboy banter online from each team to assume that they are much of a muchness. One of my best mates swears by Seagate. I had a Toshiba drive fail on me once, I can't say that they are worthless because of it. There is no fantastic technology that goes into one or the other and they all seem to be made in Thailand by semi-skilled factory hands, not magic elves or master craftsmen.

    ..either that or God just helps me ;)


    As for "24/7" drives, a Lexus may be a luxury car but it's still just a Toyota...
  6. That is like saying - a Lamborghini is not a Lamborghini, but Volkswagen. Well sorry, but even if Lamborghini is owned by Volkswagen group, it's still a Lamborghini.
  7. No, it's not the same. The Volkswagon group purchased a large share of Lamborghini, Lexus is and always has been the luxury line of Toyota production. They use many of the same parts although the Lexus ones cost more and come in different boxes. It's called branding.

    Currently there are only three manufacturers of hard disk drives in the world. The are: Western Digital, Seagate and Toshiba. All of the drives that you see with other stickers on them are produced by one of these three companies. You even mentioned Hitachi are currently produced by WD further up this page... That is again an example of branding....
  8. I must correct myself and Shneiky here - since 2012 Hitachi 3.5" Drives have been manufactured by Toshiba.
  9. A slight correction:

    " in May 2012 WD divested to Toshiba assets that enabled Toshiba to manufacture and sell 3.5-inch hard drives"

    There is a possibility that some Hitachi drives are manufactured in Toshiba foundries. But what that implies is that WD sold assets (unspecified) that would enable Toshiba to produce drives. This is solely different. To most extend the new "Hitachi"s are produced in the old HGST factories, even under Toshiba branding. This is very different than "Toshiba making Hitachi". The truth is more of "old Hitachi is manufacturing Toshiba".
  10. "This is very different than "Toshiba making Hitachi"."

    - Except that this is literally the case. Hitachi is a company who sold all of their 3.5" hard drive production assets to Toshiba, who now produce them, branded or not. No member of the Hitachi Company has had any input or oversight to the production, work methods or processes used to produce these drives since then. Those are entirely up to Toshiba, who don't own a controlling stock, but EVERYTHING from the factory floor up.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_defunct_hard_disk_manufacturers#cite_note-7

    "7^ Smith, Ryan (2012-03-06), Western Digital To Sell Hitachi's 3.5" Hard Drive Business To Toshiba, Complete Hitachi Buyout, retrieved 2012-12-30, "Western Digital will be allowed to acquire Hitachi’s 2.5” and SSD businesses, but not the 3.5” business. Instead Western Digital will be selling that business to Toshiba – factories and all – along with granting licenses for the necessary patents, which would allow Toshiba to effectively continue in the 3.5” market from where Hitachi left off. This would firmly establish Seagate, Western Digital, and Toshiba as the 3 major players in the hard drive business across all product segments.""

    What you seem to be suggesting is that Toshiba had a bit of money laying around and thought that they might like to see their name above the door of a HDD factory, when in fact Toshiba had been producing hard drives for years before they acquired the 3.5" division of Hitachi and actually pioneered the use of PMR recording in hard disk drives in 2005, a technology which was later adopted by Hitachi, WD and your beloved Seagate.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perpendicular_magnetic_recording


    Toshiba had also previously acquired the entire HDD production line of Fujitsu, who had also produced 3.5" drives but Toshiba stopped producing them and opted to produce smaller drives only.

    This article from 2012 - http://www.anandtech.com/show/5635/western-digital-to-sell-hitachis-35-hard-drive-business-to-toshiba-complete-hitachi-buyout

    Indicates that there was more involved in the acquisition than a simple change of letterhead. It's more than likely that Toshiba kept any and all technologies that they saw fit to (that's the whole point of buying a company rather than building a new department) but clearly had a few of their own ideas about production as well. To say that "old Hitachi is manufacturing Toshiba" is absurd.

    "... Once that happens Toshiba will apparently need some time to ramp up their production of 3.5” drives, and according to the FTC Western Digital will be doing contract manufacturing for Toshiba until Toshiba is on their feet. The deal doesn’t stipulate whether WD would be manufacturing drives based on Hitachi technology or WD technology, but it’s likely that it will be Hitachi drives..."

    Hitachi now exists purely as a brand name in the hard drive world. Hitachi do not own any part of Hitachi Global Storage Technologies, nor are they some kind of illuminati pulling strings in shadowy factories. The name exists purely for marketing purposes, just like the title "24/7 drive." Drives have a rated lifespan, given certain environmental perimeters. If you contest that notion, then please provide me with some kind of documentation from Seagate (as they are the manufacturer of the "Constellation" range that you specified above) in which they urge consumers to only use *all* of their other disk drive products on a part time basis. ...preferably dated prior to the release of the Constellation range (as they must have been scratching their heads for years about how to break the "24" barrier) - but I guess any clause in the warranty or RMA specifications of all of their other current hard drive products will suffice.
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