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How do you setup a web file server?

Last response: in Networking
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November 12, 2013 9:09:48 AM

Me and a friend of mine are going to start development on a video game, and he lives 30 miles away. So I wanted to make a web file server so we can share assets between the both of us, but I can't find any tutorials on how to do this. If any of you could show me how or give me a tutorial on how to do it that would be great

Thanks!

More about : setup web file server

November 12, 2013 9:27:57 AM

The simplest thing would be to buy something like a WD My Book Live. It has it all (including security) built in.
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November 12, 2013 9:31:20 AM

You could also use a service like Dropbox.
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November 12, 2013 11:38:38 AM

ss202sl said:
You could also use a service like Dropbox.


I didn't want to have to use a service that has a limited amount of storage on it. I have a spare computer that has a 160 GB HDD on it, so I could store assets on it as well.

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November 12, 2013 2:35:37 PM

The IIS windows component (Internet Information Server) is what will enable your machine to be a web server. But creating a website that "looks" like a file share is going to take you a while to code from scratch.

Enabling FTP on your machine will work as well.

In either case you will have to expose your machine to the web and security becomes a more complex problem.

Can you just compress (zip up) the files and email them back and forth?
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Best solution

November 12, 2013 2:42:39 PM

If you are going to be developing a game you will probably need some kind of asset repository.

I am not sure what you are using in terms of development, but GIT works quite well... and it doesn't really require much setup. Just run a Linux virtual machine on your host (using VirtualBox) -- create a git account or two separate accounts... install GIT and setup SSH.

You and your friend can just use "Tortoise GIT" for Windows, or just GIT for Linux, and interact with your game repository from anywhere.

There you go, you can now develop using a version-controlled repository.

Also since you are sand boxing your server and using SSH, security really won't be much of an issue, as long as you don't set your root account to have the password "root". :")
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November 12, 2013 2:56:00 PM

onichikun said:
If you are going to be developing a game you will probably need some kind of asset repository.

I am not sure what you are using in terms of development, but GIT works quite well... and it doesn't really require much setup. Just run a Linux virtual machine on your host (using VirtualBox) -- create a git account or two separate accounts... install GIT and setup SSH.

You and your friend can just use "Tortoise GIT" for Windows, or just GIT for Linux, and interact with your game repository from anywhere.

There you go, you can now develop using a version-controlled repository.

Also since you are sand boxing your server and using SSH, security really won't be much of an issue, as long as you don't set your root account to have the password "root". :")


Are you referring to this GIT?
git-scm.com

Also I have a spare computer that I wanted to use as the server, would that be possible?

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November 12, 2013 3:46:41 PM

Mucus said:
onichikun said:
If you are going to be developing a game you will probably need some kind of asset repository.

I am not sure what you are using in terms of development, but GIT works quite well... and it doesn't really require much setup. Just run a Linux virtual machine on your host (using VirtualBox) -- create a git account or two separate accounts... install GIT and setup SSH.

You and your friend can just use "Tortoise GIT" for Windows, or just GIT for Linux, and interact with your game repository from anywhere.

There you go, you can now develop using a version-controlled repository.

Also since you are sand boxing your server and using SSH, security really won't be much of an issue, as long as you don't set your root account to have the password "root". :")


Are you referring to this GIT?
git-scm.com

Also I have a spare computer that I wanted to use as the server, would that be possible?



Yes, GIT is a version control system developed to manage the Linux kernel source code. It is EXTREMELY powerful for maintaining programming projects with multiple developers.

If you install Ubuntu (if you are not familiar with Linux) on your other machine, you can setup SSH and GIT on it. Setup two user accounts and you are done.

A simple setup guide:
http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-on-the-Server-Setting-Up...

Don't let the Linuxy-ness put you off. It is worth learning and setting up, especially if you are serious about developing.

Also, if you have a NAT-based firewall, you will need to make sure you have a pin-hole for port 22 (SSH's default port). Also, you may want to look into a dynamic DNS service so your friend can access your server even if your ISP releases your assigned IP address.
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November 13, 2013 9:41:46 AM

onichikun said:
Mucus said:
onichikun said:
If you are going to be developing a game you will probably need some kind of asset repository.

I am not sure what you are using in terms of development, but GIT works quite well... and it doesn't really require much setup. Just run a Linux virtual machine on your host (using VirtualBox) -- create a git account or two separate accounts... install GIT and setup SSH.

You and your friend can just use "Tortoise GIT" for Windows, or just GIT for Linux, and interact with your game repository from anywhere.

There you go, you can now develop using a version-controlled repository.

Also since you are sand boxing your server and using SSH, security really won't be much of an issue, as long as you don't set your root account to have the password "root". :")


Are you referring to this GIT?
git-scm.com

Also I have a spare computer that I wanted to use as the server, would that be possible?



Yes, GIT is a version control system developed to manage the Linux kernel source code. It is EXTREMELY powerful for maintaining programming projects with multiple developers.

If you install Ubuntu (if you are not familiar with Linux) on your other machine, you can setup SSH and GIT on it. Setup two user accounts and you are done.

A simple setup guide:
http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-on-the-Server-Setting-Up...

Don't let the Linuxy-ness put you off. It is worth learning and setting up, especially if you are serious about developing.

Also, if you have a NAT-based firewall, you will need to make sure you have a pin-hole for port 22 (SSH's default port). Also, you may want to look into a dynamic DNS service so your friend can access your server even if your ISP releases your assigned IP address.


I'm sorry but I have one more question, are you referring to a server or desktop OS?
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November 13, 2013 10:09:23 AM

Mucus said:
onichikun said:
Mucus said:
onichikun said:
If you are going to be developing a game you will probably need some kind of asset repository.

I am not sure what you are using in terms of development, but GIT works quite well... and it doesn't really require much setup. Just run a Linux virtual machine on your host (using VirtualBox) -- create a git account or two separate accounts... install GIT and setup SSH.

You and your friend can just use "Tortoise GIT" for Windows, or just GIT for Linux, and interact with your game repository from anywhere.

There you go, you can now develop using a version-controlled repository.

Also since you are sand boxing your server and using SSH, security really won't be much of an issue, as long as you don't set your root account to have the password "root". :")


Are you referring to this GIT?
git-scm.com

Also I have a spare computer that I wanted to use as the server, would that be possible?



Yes, GIT is a version control system developed to manage the Linux kernel source code. It is EXTREMELY powerful for maintaining programming projects with multiple developers.

If you install Ubuntu (if you are not familiar with Linux) on your other machine, you can setup SSH and GIT on it. Setup two user accounts and you are done.

A simple setup guide:
http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-on-the-Server-Setting-Up...

Don't let the Linuxy-ness put you off. It is worth learning and setting up, especially if you are serious about developing.

Also, if you have a NAT-based firewall, you will need to make sure you have a pin-hole for port 22 (SSH's default port). Also, you may want to look into a dynamic DNS service so your friend can access your server even if your ISP releases your assigned IP address.


I'm sorry but I have one more question, are you referring to a server or desktop OS?


You can use either server or desktop versions of an operating system. If you are referring to Ubuntu, the server edition doesn't have a GUI by default -- so if you want a GUI install the desktop version.

I can give you a step-by-step guide if you need. Just tell me if you want to use Ubuntu server or Ubuntu desktop.

Also, what language(s) are you going to be developing your game in? C/C++? Or are you using some kind of game development suite?
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