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How long to wait for Chkdsk on 100 GB SSD?

Last response: in Windows 7
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November 12, 2013 11:31:28 AM

I have a 256 gig SSD hard drive, it is split into two, one 100gb and one 140 gb. The C:\ is the 100gb one and it has windows 7 on it. Basically my computer is at a state where it can't function for 20 minutes without getting blue screen. It says a crucial process or a thread has been terminated. I tried to run /sfc scannow but it didn't do anything. So now I'm doing this disk check but its been going for 16+ hours and the whole time its on 1 spot, 60% working on index 142828 out of 174856. So my question is, how long should I wait for it to run on this 100bg SSD?
Microsoft says it can take several days, but I'm wondering if anyone has experience running it on an SSD and if it takes less time on a SSD?

I read that chkdsk is useless for SSDs because it was designed for hardrives, but I'm at a point where I dont know what else to do, the computer is a month old 7.7/7.9 score, and already can't run without crashing.
a b $ Windows 7
November 12, 2013 11:41:13 AM

Does not sound good. If I were you I would just replace the drive, given the fact that it's the system drive, as well. It is possible that it's controller is going bad, or some of the flash chips on it.
After replacement you could try to run the scan on it again, this time as an external drive, and see what happens.
Did you use any parameters, for chkdsk, like /f or /r? If so, these take a long time to run (it's a 5 step process).
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November 12, 2013 11:48:22 AM

house70 said:
Does not sound good. If I were you I would just replace the drive, given the fact that it's the system drive, as well. It is possible that it's controller is going bad, or some of the flash chips on it.
After replacement you could try to run the scan on it again, this time as an external drive, and see what happens.
Did you use any parameters, for chkdsk, like /f or /r? If so, these take a long time to run (it's a 5 step process).

I'm not sure about parameters because this scan started on its own. One time computer froze so I pressed the restart button on the case and it kept asking me for chkdsk at start up from that point onwards. I would always skip it but now that the computer is pretty much unusable I'm running it as my last ditch effort.

Sorry to come back at you with more questions but I'm fairly new to this stuff.
What is replace the drive? exchange the actual ssd hard drive for a new one?
What is the controller that is going bad?
What are flash chips? is that the flash memory? is it going to be messed up if i eventually re install windows?

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a b $ Windows 7
November 12, 2013 11:52:45 AM

A couple of minutes to do chkdsk c:/f

Anything more and I would start looking at a bad drive.

I would run the manufacturers own diagnostic software.
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a b $ Windows 7
November 12, 2013 12:02:04 PM

Yes, replacing the actual SSD was what I had in mind. If the system is still under warranty you can use that.
Flash memory=flash chips (memory chips) that store the data on the SSD.
Controller is the gateway that interfaces the memory with the rest of the system (coordinates data transfer between the system and the SSD).
A new Windows installation on the same SSD might be able to isolate the bad sectors and not use them (in best case scenario) but you'll end up with a lower capacity on that partition and you'll never know when other sectors will fail, as well. If the controller is bad you have no option but to replace the SSD.
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November 12, 2013 7:28:56 PM

Its been 26+ hours now and still at that same spot, 60% index 142828, i read on some other forum that one guy had chkdsk running for 2.5 weeks but that was 500 gb regular hardrive not SSD. Mine is 100gb and SSD
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a b $ Windows 7
November 12, 2013 8:48:17 PM

gzfzvz said:
Its been 26+ hours now and still at that same spot, 60% index 142828, i read on some other forum that one guy had chkdsk running for 2.5 weeks but that was 500 gb regular hardrive not SSD. Mine is 100gb and SSD


I don't think chkdsk is good for SSD's for a couple of reasons.

One is that it is the on-board controller that decides how the data is arranged on the drive and Windows can't get around this.

Also, the way that chkdsk works could conflict with the SSD controller. If chkdsk tries to write to a specific address then the controller might write to somewhere different.

The SSD controller employs a technique called 'wear levelling'. Each element in the memory matrix can only be written a certain number of times, they quite literally 'wear down' with each write process. So as to compensate for uneven use of the space, the controller organizes and move data around in order to ensure that the majority of the cells exceed their limit at the same time.

In other words, the SSD is trying to resist the wear on its memory due to the many writes that are being performed by chkdsk.

However frankly, I wouldn't be considering the SSD or chkdsk at this stage as I think Windows has fouled up its attempts to come up with a memory manager that can deal with multi-threaded, multi-core systems.

Is yours such a system?

Try this.

Go into BIOS and disable multi-threading and disable two of your cores, if you have four.

Do you still get the crashes?

If not, then you should think about uninstalling all Windows update since about a time just before you started having these problems.

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