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Using 2133Mhz RAM without overclocking Intel processors?

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November 12, 2013 3:34:43 PM

Hi there,

So on the spec sheet for my new i5-4670K it says the RAM speed to use is maximum 1600Mhz. I recently spoke to an Intel support agent on live chat to investigate this; he also informed me that by defult Intel processors should only be used with RAM that is set to use 1.5v. He explained as far as Intel have developed, they are only recommended to be used with memory set to this maximum speed and voltage. He explained that without overclocking the CPU, using RAM with a higher voltage setting or higher speed can either result in instability or a higher risk to damage to the processor. He then explained that overclocking the CPU obviously comes with it's own risks.

My recent (and first) build used this processor as well as the Kingston 8GB (2x4GB) 2133Mhz Predator kit. Naturally I setup the RAM to use an XMP profile to reach 2133Mhz in the BIOS and changed the voltage provided to the RAM, since it required 1.6v opposed to the defult 1.5v. Since I did that, I've been experiencing problems with process hangs, which the Intel support rep said is likely caused by my RAM setup.

My question to you guys is, if you are using RAM above 1600Mhz with an Intel processor, is it crucial to overclock your CPU to ensure stability and reduce risk of damage? I'm relatively new to this as this was my first build so any advice that could help would be very helpful :) 

Thanks,
Char
November 12, 2013 3:44:50 PM

If your motherboard supports it, you will be ok. lol
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November 12, 2013 3:49:21 PM

WarWolverineWarrior said:
If your motherboard supports it, you will be ok. lol


Specification -

CPU - Support for Intel Core 4th Generation LGA 1150 Processors(Go to GIGABYTE's website for the latest CPU support list.)
Chipset - Intel Z87 Express Chipset
Memory - 4x DDR3 1600/1333/1066 MHz memory modules, (1866/2133/2200/2400/2600/2800Mhz OC)
* Due to Windows 32-bit operating system limitation, when more than 4 GB of physical memory is installed, the actual memory size displayed will be less than 4 GB.

This is the specifications for my motherboard - Does this essentially mean that my CPU needs to be overclocked in order to support RAM at 2133Mhz?

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a c 358 K Overclocking
a c 2002 } Memory
a c 241 å Intel
November 12, 2013 4:03:18 PM

Your particuar CPU might, most 4670Ks can caryy 1866 at stock, quite a few can carry 2133, some need a sligh OC (gen 4.0 or 4.1 which is simply a matter of changing your multiplier,(and possibly adding a touch to vCore, though not normally)
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November 12, 2013 4:15:43 PM

Tradesman1 said:
Your particuar CPU might, most 4670Ks can caryy 1866 at stock, quite a few can carry 2133, some need a sligh OC (gen 4.0 or 4.1 which is simply a matter of changing your multiplier,(and possibly adding a touch to vCore, though not normally)


So if I'm right, 4670K's have a max turbo frequnecy of 3.8Ghz, increasing the mutliplier to match this and slightly increasing vCore would help with stability? I'm still not convinced that having RAM at 2133Mhz not properly optimised with the processor is causing process hangs... Opinions?
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a c 358 K Overclocking
a c 2002 } Memory
a c 241 å Intel
November 12, 2013 4:52:58 PM

Set the CPU multiplier to 40 and give it a try, maybe add + 0.040 to vCore and see how it goes (also ensure you have latest BIOS and XMP is enabled (and if selection offered you use Profile 1 not Profile 2 which is more enthusiast oriented and may reuire a voltage adjustment)
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a c 141 K Overclocking
a b } Memory
a b å Intel
November 13, 2013 12:14:26 PM

Charitzo said:
Hi there,

So on the spec sheet for my new i5-4670K it says the RAM speed to use is maximum 1600Mhz. I recently spoke to an Intel support agent on live chat to investigate this; he also informed me that by defult Intel processors should only be used with RAM that is set to use 1.5v. He explained as far as Intel have developed, they are only recommended to be used with memory set to this maximum speed and voltage. He explained that without overclocking the CPU, using RAM with a higher voltage setting or higher speed can either result in instability or a higher risk to damage to the processor. He then explained that overclocking the CPU obviously comes with it's own risks.

My recent (and first) build used this processor as well as the Kingston 8GB (2x4GB) 2133Mhz Predator kit. Naturally I setup the RAM to use an XMP profile to reach 2133Mhz in the BIOS and changed the voltage provided to the RAM, since it required 1.6v opposed to the defult 1.5v. Since I did that, I've been experiencing problems with process hangs, which the Intel support rep said is likely caused by my RAM setup.


I would agree with the Intel rep. If your CPU is running non-OC'ed at 3.4 - 3.8 GHz and increasing your RAM frequency to 2133 MHz causes system instability, you have RAM which is either defective or incompatible.

Charitzo said:
My question to you guys is, if you are using RAM above 1600Mhz with an Intel processor, is it crucial to overclock your CPU to ensure stability and reduce risk of damage? I'm relatively new to this as this was my first build so any advice that could help would be very helpful :) 

Thanks,
Char


I can assure you that it is most definitely NOT necessary to OC the CPU in order to use RAM at 2133 MHz. I have the Crucial Ballistix Tactical RAM in my system which is rated at 1600 MHz 8-8-8-24 1.35 v. and I have OC'ed it to 2133 MHz at 11-11-11-32 1.50v. Although I CAN OC my system to 4.6 - 4.7 GHz, 98% of the time I have my BIOS set to allow the speed and voltage to change automatically with load. Most of the time I am just web surfing with 8 tabs open in Firefox and one is a YouTube video (for the music) and MS Outlook open for e-mail. Under these conditions, my CPU runs at 0.80 GHz to 1.40 GHz and is completely stable!

I would suggest testing your RAM at 2133 MHz with Memtest 86 to see if there are any obvious defects. Regardless, you should not be experiencing the problems that you have just because your CPU is not OC'ed!

Yogi

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a c 358 K Overclocking
a c 2002 } Memory
a c 241 å Intel
November 13, 2013 4:43:56 PM

Sorry, but yes at times you do...just because you can run 2133 on a single system or two or three or 5 does not make a certainty for all systems, there's a variety of factors that play in to the ability to run 2133 with a 4670K,

A) The DRAM itself, it may well be good, and test well but also may be marginal 2133 sticks, just as some will easily OC from say 1600 to 1866, some won't, others will but that's it, and others can OC even higher (of course I'm talking reasonable OCs here, not using unsafe or outlandish voltage or dropping to low timings which can defeat the purpose of the OC, have seen numerous rigs where they've gone from 1600 to 2133 or so and the DRAM is so loose it performsa better at 1600 or 1866. Another thing with the DRAM is the spec CL, it's much easier to run 2133 with a loose slow CL of 11 vs a 2133/9.

B) The CPU itself - While many believe that a 4670K is a 4670K is a 4670K (just as many believe that all 9-9-9-27 1.5 1600 sticks is the same and are interchangeable ) they are wrong on both counts - you can take 10 separate 4670K's and put in one in the same exact rig (single mobo- DRAM - etc without changing anything but the CPU, and find that to OC to 4.4 or whatever - each might take a different vCore, and possibly even that not all of them can even run 4.4 (as an example), the same is exactly true of the MC (memory controller) located in the CPU at stock, many may be able to run 2133/9 , some might not, and others may actually be able to run 2400...

C) The mobo itself - this is yet another common misconception - for whatever reason most people seem to think XMP is magical, you enable it and - POOF! - the DRAM itself magically plays invader and goes into the computer and says "Hey I'm 2133/9 is I'm going to work", and in fact it's nothing like that - DRAM is an inert stick of ICs, PCB, solder etc - on it is a Storage area much like the ROM of a computer called the SPD which simply holds info about the sticks that came in the package of DRAM you bought, (and same exact sticks will have different info in them in a 2 stick package, a 3sticks or a 4 stick package), it's completely up to to the BIOS of the mobo to take that data from the SPD and implement it to the mobo, and all too often it doesn't always work as it should (they are getting better and better at it though), especially on new mobo models as they are often rushed to market and the BIOS's have bugs, and memory bugs are a continuous problem as new lines of sticks, and higher capacities come out, many see all the BIOS updates that come out for mobos (many now issue about an update a month) and while they may offer a label like "increase system stability", a BIOS update will have all kinds of fixes and improvements for the BIOS and the largest chunk of fixes/improvements generally is centered on DRAM.

These are all things a casual builder will never see, but I've had numerous occasions where I've built multiple ('identiacal") systems for businesses and even homes, and it's amazing the differences in each rig to get them all to run at a particular OC or even with all at stock, how voltages vary, etc.

Some good reads on CPU capabilities, QVLs, Haswell Memory scaling:


http://www.hardocp.com/article/2013/06/01/intel_haswell...

http://www.gskill.us/forum/showthread.php?t=10566

http://www.anandtech.com/show/7364/memory-scaling-on-ha...
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March 1, 2014 6:40:41 AM

Since he bought the Kingston 8GB (2x4GB) 2133MHz Predator kit, it is rated at 2133MHz without overclocking and he did setup the motherboard to use the correct XMP profile. If the 2133MHz XMP profile had 1.5V, is it necessary for him to change the voltage to 1.6V? If the 2133MHz XMP profile had 1.6V, is it necessary for him to make additional adjustment for 1.6V?

Is there a setting in the motherboard to change the CPU memory controller from default 1600MHz to 2133MHz? Shouldn't the CPU memory controller be in sync with the 2133MHz memory kit? Over-clocking the CPU just raise the processor frequency, that's not the same as memory controller frequency right?
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