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First Time Overclocking my MSI GTX 660 Ti Power Edition OC. Need help. Thanks

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  • Overclocking
  • Power
  • CPUs
  • MSI
  • Gtx
Last response: in Overclocking
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November 12, 2013 3:37:16 PM

I'm using MSI Afterburner. I've also got TechPowerUp GPU-Z and MSI Kombustor installed. I want a stable overclock for my MSI GTX 660 Ti Power Edition OC. I tried an overclock I found on the web yesterday, but it didn't seem to be stable. I increased my power limit from 100% to 114%, core clock to +100, and memory clock to +130. I was a little paranoid and exhausted yesterday so I stopped. Anyways, if anyone could provide me with a very simple yet stable overclock, I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks!

My system specs:
CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO
Motherboard: MSI Z77A-GD65, BIOS 10.7
GPU: MSI GTX 660 Ti Power Edition OC
SSD: Samsung 830 Series, 128GB
OS: Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit
Memory: Corsair Vengeance Low Profile 8GB
PSU: Seasonic X-650

EDIT 7:09 PM 11/12/2013: I ran Unigine's Heaven Benchmark 4.0 and scored a 822. I increased my power limit from 100 to 114, my core clock to +50, and my memory clock to +200. It went black for a few seconds near the beginning on the dragon statue scene, but I guess it ended up pulling through because it didn't crash and the screen came back on. I don't know whether to decrease a large amount of the memory clock, or decrease maybe 5 or 10 of the core clock on my next test to ensure that it will be fully stable. Opinions?

More about : time overclocking msi gtx 660 power edition

a b K Overclocking
a c 78 à CPUs
November 12, 2013 7:10:44 PM

It's not a matter of plugging in numbers that someone else used on another card. (All cards are different....even if they have the exact same part number)

Try moving in small steps changing one variable at a time. Max out your stable memory speed, then move to the core clock.

Since the 660ti is memory-bandwidth limited, I would try getting my max stable memory overclock first. -Then move to the core clock.(Leave the core clock stock until you get the memory sorted out)

Regardless of what variable you choose to work on first, use small steps, and multiple tests for stability. (At least a couple stress tests and some gaming too)

You want to be as sure as you can be that you have stabilized one variable before moving to the other.

Make sure you watch your temps during the stress tests too.
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November 14, 2013 3:25:43 PM

Z1NONLY said:
It's not a matter of plugging in numbers that someone else used on another card. (All cards are different....even if they have the exact same part number)

Try moving in small steps changing one variable at a time. Max out your stable memory speed, then move to the core clock.

Since the 660ti is memory-bandwidth limited, I would try getting my max stable memory overclock first. -Then move to the core clock.(Leave the core clock stock until you get the memory sorted out)

Regardless of what variable you choose to work on first, use small steps, and multiple tests for stability. (At least a couple stress tests and some gaming too)

You want to be as sure as you can be that you have stabilized one variable before moving to the other.

Make sure you watch your temps during the stress tests too.


People keep telling me that increasing the core clock gives a bigger performance boost than increasing the memory clock. I've been told by only one other person to increase the memory clock first. The highest I can set it to would be +1000. I see a bunch of people overclocking their MSI GTX 660 Ti in the +50 - +150 core clock and +200 - +500 memory clock range. Setting my memory clock to +1000 alone seems like it would be too much even I kept my core clock on default.
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a b K Overclocking
a c 78 à CPUs
November 14, 2013 6:09:24 PM

+1000 Would be way too high, I agree. And it would not be stable at all.

I recommend going for your highest STABLE memory clock speed (moving in small steps) first. Then looking for your fastest stable core clock. (again, moving in small increments)

Just to clarify:

All cards have different overclocking potential. You have to figure out what your particular card can do. No one can tell you where your highest clocks will end up being without actually testing your card themselves. You have to find your own card's max speeds.

"Many people" can easily overclock their 780's up to and past 1100 core clock speed on stock voltage. My particular card can't.

On the other hand, the two 560's I just upgraded from overclocked pretty well (better than average) with no extra voltage at all.

Different cards (even identical part numbers) have different potential.

Find your card's potential.



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November 14, 2013 8:05:15 PM

Thanks Z1NONLY, i'll give it a try tomorrow
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