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Very VERY weird situation CPU Temps & BIOS Settings i5 3570k

So I'm running a core i5 3570k on an asus p8z77-v w/ stock cooler. I was having trouble with my cpu temps. At first I maxed out at 92 Centigrade. Then I reseated my cooler and got 86 degrees Centigrade. Then I re-applied thermal compound and got 84 degrees Celsius. Now this is the weird part. Looking back at my test from a few weeks ago, I suddenly noticed my cpu was running at 4.8ghz on a stock cooler! I never set it to that. Just built my computer, flashed bios to newest version, and that's all. Never changed any settings. I went through the bios and saw this turbo boost option for my cpu. It was set to Manual (oddly enough I couldn't seem to actually manually set the clock speed for the turbo boost). I changed it to auto settings and then ran temp tests. I maxed out at 69 degrees. I know some people consider that to be pretty high but to me it was a victory. Anybody familiar to Asus boards and why the hell it allowed my cpu to run at 4.8ghz practically all the time? Sorry if I got anything wrong or said anything noobish as I am a bit of a pc noob.

Also playing bf4 my pc temps were pretty high. I'll try the game out again w/ this fix and see my temps and framerate/performance. THANKS!

UPDATE: I'm actually getting better performance than I ever did! Im getting 132fps compared to 110fps before. I know actually have to enable vertical sync settings because I'm actually getting screen tear on my 60hz monitor. But why were the bios settings so out of whack?
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  1. Sometimes after a power loss (or temporal power instability) some BIOS settings get changed, seems like something similar happened to your mobo and OCed the cpu (luckily not to a really unstable point).

    Now with stock settings you seem to be hitting normal temps (69ºC under load is within normal reports for an ivy CPU on stock cooler, some get lower temps due to better airflow in the case and lower ambient temps.)
  2. RaDiKaL_ said:
    Sometimes after a power loss (or temporal power instability) some BIOS settings get changed, seems like something similar happened to your mobo and OCed the cpu (luckily not to a really unstable point).

    Now with stock settings you seem to be hitting normal temps (69ºC under load is within normal reports for an ivy CPU on stock cooler, some get lower temps due to better airflow in the case and lower ambient temps.)


    Hmm.. I have my pc plugged into a power strip that I turn off each night when I'm done with my pc for peace of mind. Maybe I should leave it on? The mobo has an annoying bright green light and keeps the usb peripherals powered on all the time which is really annoying but it's better than my cpu frying up. I'll continue my power conservation habits and see if it happens again. I guess if it does, I'll call it quits and leave it on all the time unless im going out of town. Also when you say temporal power instability, I interpret that as you're saying my psu isn't doing it's job 100%. I have a Corsair HX750 semi-modular and as far as my limited knowledge goes, It's a pretty high quality power supply. Thanks a million for the quick reply. The mobo randomly oc'ing my cpu sounds like something straight out of robot-takes-over-the-world movie. :P
  3. I should have been more clear about the "power instability" I meant instability in the power lines of the house.

    You could leave the power strip plugged in, and just turn off the switch of your PSU after powering down the pc.

    There's something I've read in every PSU manual, they always indicate that before plugging the PSU you must have it's power button off, then plug the power cord and then turn on the PSU, dunno exactly why they recommend that (hope some1 else explains that), but basically when you turn on and off the power strip it's like plugging the PSU without previously turning it off.
  4. Best answer
    Interesting, never heard of a situation like this.

    As long as your system is stable, it should be fine with the reduced temps.

    The lower the better right? If you start running into issues in the future though, this might be why, but as long as your stable: you should be fine.

    Also, turning off your power strip off at night, or something like that doesn't really matter, as when your PC is off, its pretty much off, I doubt your BIOS can be altered like that, when your PC is at an software state of off.

    But as for the BIOS, it can simply be a glitch, or as RaDiKaL said, caused by power instability.

    69c is very good, especially for stock, im hitting 75c with a 3570 w/ a Hyper 212 on stock.. so you're fine.

    Have a nice day, Dave.
  5. 75c is not good at stock, if mine goes higher than that... well I don't let it. 80c is the absolute maximum you want a CPU at.
  6. Not true, Intel Sandy Bridge and above CPUs are rated to a 105c TjMax, which is their highest temp threshold, before they start thermal throttling.

    80c is fine, but I start getting concerned around 90c.

    Remember, not all CPUs are equal, especially with the Ivy Bridge and Haswell, using thermal paste instead of the solder method for the die and the heat spreader.

    Oh and I'm talking about Intel CPUs, not AMD CPUs.
  7. PCDave said:
    Interesting, never heard of a situation like this.

    As long as your system is stable, it should be fine with the reduced temps.

    The lower the better right? If you start running into issues in the future though, this might be why, but as long as your stable: you should be fine.

    Also, turning off your power strip off at night, or something like that doesn't really matter, as when your PC is off, its pretty much off, I doubt your BIOS can be altered like that, when your PC is at an software state of off.

    But as for the BIOS, it can simply be a glitch, or as RaDiKaL said, caused by power instability.

    69c is very good, especially for stock, im hitting 75c with a 3570 w/ a Hyper 212 on stock.. so you're fine.

    Have a nice day, Dave.


    Special people have special problems :P Thanks for the reply.
  8. RaDiKaL_ said:
    I should have been more clear about the "power instability" I meant instability in the power lines of the house.

    You could leave the power strip plugged in, and just turn off the switch of your PSU after powering down the pc.

    There's something I've read in every PSU manual, they always indicate that before plugging the PSU you must have it's power button off, then plug the power cord and then turn on the PSU, dunno exactly why they recommend that (hope some1 else explains that), but basically when you turn on and off the power strip it's like plugging the PSU without previously turning it off.


    Hmm.. really interested about flipping the power switch off before plugging in and unplugging. Can't seem to find any info as to why or just a super safety caution. Did find some info suggesting that cutting the power by unplugging it puts some premature wear on the power supply... but don't know how credible that is. Maybe I'll flip the switch but it's in a hard to reach place and I'm lazy. ;)
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