Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Very basic editing PC for home/office

Tags:
  • Home Basic
  • Office
  • CPUs
  • pc
  • Basic
  • editing
Last response: in CPUs
Share
November 18, 2013 1:30:26 PM

Putting together a very basic editing PC for home/office use.

Uses will be editing workout footage and uploading to YouTube. Probably wont use anything more advanced than Windows Movie Maker to be honest. Will also most likely watch a lot of videos on the web such as YouTube, etc and the rest of the usage will just be basic word processing, web browsing, email, etc.

Here is what I have so far:
CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus M5A97 LE R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($69.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($84.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ OutletPC)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 430W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($19.99 @ Microcenter)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.00 @ Amazon)
Total: $445.93
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-11-18 16:16 EST-0500)

Not sure if the FX 6300 is too much for this?

Not sure if 8GB of RAM is overkill?

I need to find a case for the build. I don't want anything like a huge gaming PC tower. Something very average in size for a home/office tower.

Is 430 watt PSU too much or too little for my needs?

500GB of storage should be plenty but I choose 1TB because it was literally only a few dollars difference. Can anyone explain this? Did I not choose something equally as fast maybe?

I would like for the entire build to be under $400 w/ Windows 7 if possible. I'm putting this together for a friend who needs it for very basic use. The only thing that throws me off is that he wants to edit and upload his gym footage to the web. He's not computer savvy at all (Windows Movie Maker).

More about : basic editing home office

a b à CPUs
November 18, 2013 1:41:56 PM

Here is something very basic for your friend

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i3-2120 3.3GHz Dual-Core Processor ($117.94 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-H61M-S1 Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($32.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill 4GB (2 x 2GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($37.91 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ OutletPC)
Case: Apex PC-389-C ATX Mid Tower Case ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 430W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($19.99 @ Microcenter)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.00 @ Amazon)
Total: $392.79
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-11-18 16:41 EST-0500)
m
0
l

Best solution

November 18, 2013 1:43:50 PM

I think your set-up is fine - yes, it may be slightly overkill, but you can't really do it much cheaper and be sure it's going to be capable. If you want to save money you could try slightly slower RAM, but 1600MHz is really the slowest you should use. Also Corsair supplies are great - I use a bunch of them, but they are a little pricey. You could save a little there, but Corsair reliability is top notch. For a case I would recommend something like Corsair Carbide Series 200R - for about $50 it is a good deal - very flexible and easy/clean internal routing. With the HDD you MUST stick to 7200rpm as that will impact your video a lot. 500GB is probably enough for quite a few video's assuming no monster-games are installed ;) 

Sorry - I misread your message... for $19.99 stay with Corsair for the PSU!
Share
Related resources
November 18, 2013 1:47:03 PM

Thank you for your quick reply!
m
0
l
a c 100 à CPUs
November 18, 2013 1:53:50 PM

While the i3 suggested above is a good dual core CPU, the additional cores on the FX 6300 (6 total) will help speed up your render and encoding times over the i3.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
November 18, 2013 4:02:50 PM

maddogfargo said:
While the i3 suggested above is a good dual core CPU, the additional cores on the FX 6300 (6 total) will help speed up your render and encoding times over the i3.

This, the FX 6300 outperforms i3 in terms of performance so you can run your office programs faster, etc.

m
0
l
a b à CPUs
November 18, 2013 4:25:09 PM

That system looks pretty good and the price for it is great but I don't see anything there in terms of the display adapter you plan to use. You don't need anything major, a $30 Radeon HD 5450 should do the trick.
http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1681...
And a Core i3 vs an FX-6300? I'd take the 6300 seven days a week and twice on Sundays. Programs are becoming more and more threaded and the dual-core i3 will find itself to be a dinosaur VERY quickly. Hell, I'd probably take a Phenom II X4 over an i3 for that same reason. I remember when games became more threaded and suddenly the Phenom II X4 was recommended again by tomshardware again after it had been missing from "The best gaming cpus for the money" list for over a year. That's what the extra cores give you, versatility down the road.
m
0
l
!