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How do factory overclocked components retain their overclock?

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November 22, 2013 2:36:31 AM

Hi guys,

So a bit of a silly question. I was wondering how do factory overclocked GPU/CPU retain their overclock when you take them out of your PC. Let's say I use the BIOS to overclock my CPU, when I take it out and put it in another motherboard, it will be reset to default, correct? Same with GPU using tools like EVGA Precision or MSI Afterburner.

However when I look at custom cooled graphics cards that are factory overclocked then these maintain the overclock, how is that possible?

Thank you
a b K Overclocking
a b à CPUs
November 22, 2013 2:40:05 AM

They have a bios too.
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a b K Overclocking
a b à CPUs
November 22, 2013 2:46:17 AM

The cpu speed is set by the motherboard so an overclocked cpu will drop back to default speeds in a new mb

A GPU has its own BIOS and the speed it runs at is controlled by that , so it would stay overclocked in a new computer
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November 22, 2013 2:47:32 AM

Glaiveian said:
Hi guys,

So a bit of a silly question. I was wondering how do factory overclocked GPU/CPU retain their overclock when you take them out of your PC. Let's say I use the BIOS to overclock my CPU, when I take it out and put it in another motherboard, it will be reset to default, correct? Same with GPU using tools like EVGA Precision or MSI Afterburner.

However when I look at custom cooled graphics cards that are factory overclocked then these maintain the overclock, how is that possible?

Thank you


Taking out the graphics card is not the same as taking out a CPU since you are not taking out the GPU but the graphics card board with it. That's like taking out a CPU attached to the motherboard being taken out from the cabinet and stored. GPU looks similar to a CPU and is attached to the graphics card board. Since the board has a BIOS which is overcloked taking it out the PCI slot wont make a difference.
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November 23, 2013 8:50:45 AM

Thank you all so much for your help, that actually makes perfect sense thinking about it that way :)  much appreciated!

EDIT: I picked an answer to help others, I just chose the earliest descriptive answer, but you've all helped so thanks :) 
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November 24, 2013 12:16:33 AM

No harm in that :) 
glad cud help u
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!