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Cpu temp reaching 90C at idle!

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Last response: in CPUs
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November 24, 2013 11:35:00 AM

Hey guys, as the title says, my pc reaches unto 90C at idle. This started to happen when i was playing a game and realised my fps was awful, at the time i thought that it may have been my graphics card messing up, but then my pc lost all power and refused to turn on. It would start for two seconds, then cut out. After leaving it for a few hours I tried to turn it on again and it booted up. When i got to the desktop, i opened up core temp and realised that my CPU was at 80C at 800mhz. It normally sits around 67-8C after running a game. My pc is water cooled and has never had problems like this while i have had it.
Specs
CPU: AMD Phenom II x4 955
GPU: Nvidia geforce gtx 480
Motherboard is a gigabyte ultra durable, I can't remember the exact name and i don't know how to check without turning my pc on
PSU: Antec 620 High current gamer

I saw in another thread that it could be my thermal paste thats the problem, so i removed my water block around my cpu to see what it looked like.

My cpu;



My water block;



Does it look like the thermal paste is the problem? or could it be something else.

Thanks for any help you can give
a b à CPUs
November 24, 2013 11:43:29 AM

looks a (bit) excessive, is the pump working ?
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November 24, 2013 11:47:40 AM

The thermal paste, there is much too much of it. It prevents the two surfaces from even touching each other.
First clean all the applied paste. Use cotton and alcohol (little).
The new thermal paste to be applied should be less than the size of a rice particle. Then take an old fashioned razor blade and and run it across the paste so that the cpu should be covered with a very thin but gap-less film. The thinner it is the better. Apply paste only to cpu, not the heat sink (or only on the heat sink, not on the cpu. In other words apply on only one surface) .

Remember, even no thermal paste is better than too thick thermal paste. When there is no thermal paste the two metal surfaces will touch each other and heat will be transfered. With too much thermal paste the two metal surfaces won't even touch each other and heat will not be transfered. The thermal paste is meant to fill the tiny crevices without interfering the two surfaces touching each other healthfully and create better heat transfere.
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November 24, 2013 12:06:28 PM

gman97005 said:
looks a (bit) excessive, is the pump working ?


That could be the problem, do you know if theres a way i can test it?
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November 24, 2013 12:17:55 PM

Kursun said:
The thermal paste, there is much too much of it. It prevents the two surfaces from even touching each other.
First clean all the applied paste. Use cotton and alcohol (little).
The new thermal paste to be applied should be less than the size of a rice particle. Then take an old fashioned razor blade and and run it across the paste so that the cpu should be covered with a very thin but gap-less film. The thinner it is the better. Apply paste only to cpu, not the heat sink (or only on the heat sink, not on the cpu. In other words apply on only one surface) .

Remember, even no thermal paste is better than too thick thermal paste. When there is no thermal paste the two metal surfaces will touch each other and heat will be transfered. With too much thermal paste the two metal surfaces won't even touch each other and heat will not be transfered. The thermal paste is meant to fill the tiny crevices without interfering the two surfaces touching each other healthfully and create better heat transfere.


Thanks for the reply, but would the temperature difference be so sudden and large if it was the paste?
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a c 88 à CPUs
November 24, 2013 1:12:33 PM

isuckatusernames said:
Kursun said:
The thermal paste, there is much too much of it. It prevents the two surfaces from even touching each other.
First clean all the applied paste. Use cotton and alcohol (little).
The new thermal paste to be applied should be less than the size of a rice particle. Then take an old fashioned razor blade and and run it across the paste so that the cpu should be covered with a very thin but gap-less film. The thinner it is the better. Apply paste only to cpu, not the heat sink (or only on the heat sink, not on the cpu. In other words apply on only one surface) .

Remember, even no thermal paste is better than too thick thermal paste. When there is no thermal paste the two metal surfaces will touch each other and heat will be transfered. With too much thermal paste the two metal surfaces won't even touch each other and heat will not be transfered. The thermal paste is meant to fill the tiny crevices without interfering the two surfaces touching each other healthfully and create better heat transfere.


Thanks for the reply, but would the temperature difference be so sudden and large if it was the paste?


i suspect the water pump isnt working properly or you need to change your coolant also clean of your heatsink and cpu

get some mx4 thermal paste its usually better then the water cooler paste thats preinstalled

use isopropyl 99 percent to clean of cpu and heatsink

make sure to remove cpu so none of this stuff lands in the socket or youll be ffed lol.

dry of cpu and heatsink on the pump then add a pea size ammount on your cpu die and spread it with a plastic gift card till you have a think layer all the way across the metal of the die add a lil more if need be but do not lift the card of the die until you have a spread evenly and all over the die. Then put on the heatsink lock in place go around the heatsink sides with a cotton swab round the edges were it connects to the cpu and heatsink this removes the thermal paste squeezed out which will just add heat and ironicly seal the heat in better.

i Did this to a amd fx 8120 and it never bumped past 50c
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November 25, 2013 5:36:34 AM

beyondlogic said:
isuckatusernames said:
Kursun said:
The thermal paste, there is much too much of it. It prevents the two surfaces from even touching each other.
First clean all the applied paste. Use cotton and alcohol (little).
The new thermal paste to be applied should be less than the size of a rice particle. Then take an old fashioned razor blade and and run it across the paste so that the cpu should be covered with a very thin but gap-less film. The thinner it is the better. Apply paste only to cpu, not the heat sink (or only on the heat sink, not on the cpu. In other words apply on only one surface) .

Remember, even no thermal paste is better than too thick thermal paste. When there is no thermal paste the two metal surfaces will touch each other and heat will be transfered. With too much thermal paste the two metal surfaces won't even touch each other and heat will not be transfered. The thermal paste is meant to fill the tiny crevices without interfering the two surfaces touching each other healthfully and create better heat transfere.


Thanks for the reply, but would the temperature difference be so sudden and large if it was the paste?


i suspect the water pump isnt working properly or you need to change your coolant also clean of your heatsink and cpu

get some mx4 thermal paste its usually better then the water cooler paste thats preinstalled

use isopropyl 99 percent to clean of cpu and heatsink

make sure to remove cpu so none of this stuff lands in the socket or youll be ffed lol.

dry of cpu and heatsink on the pump then add a pea size ammount on your cpu die and spread it with a plastic gift card till you have a think layer all the way across the metal of the die add a lil more if need be but do not lift the card of the die until you have a spread evenly and all over the die. Then put on the heatsink lock in place go around the heatsink sides with a cotton swab round the edges were it connects to the cpu and heatsink this removes the thermal paste squeezed out which will just add heat and ironicly seal the heat in better.

i Did this to a amd fx 8120 and it never bumped past 50c


Thanks, i'll look into the pump and see whats going on
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