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how much 1080p hd video can i put on these dslr cameras?

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November 25, 2013 8:49:45 PM

how much 1080p can i get on these cameras canon t5i, canon t4i, panasonic g6 , nikon d5200

it you have some recomendations tell me some good dslr camera for 1000-500 that record alot of 1080p video
a b w Digital camera
November 25, 2013 9:27:49 PM

For the Canon T5i the maximum 1080p recording time depends on the size of the card. 8GB = 22 minutes, 16GB = 44 minutes.
For the Canon T4i Canon does not list it by the size of the SD card but states 22 minutes at 30, 25, and 24 fps.
According to the Nikon site the D5200 maximum recording time is 20 minutes at highest quality, 29 minutes 59 seconds at normal quality.
According to the Panasonic site the g6 HD recording capabilities (AVCHD) is as follows:
Continuous Recordable Time (Motion Image)* AVCHD: Approx. 150 min with H-PS14042, H-FS1442A, H-FS14140, H-FS45150 / Approx. 140 minwith H-FS014042
Actual Recordable Time (Motion Image)* AVCHD: Approx. 75 min with H-PS14042, H-FS1442A, H-FS14140, H-FS45150 / Approx. 70 min with H-FS014042
Recording in the MP4 format reduces the recording time to just under 30 minutes.

You will need to take into consideration the temperature at the time you are recording as it will affect recording time. In other words you will need to be aware of how hot the camera gets while you are recording video.
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November 26, 2013 3:15:01 AM

kenrivers said:
For the Canon T5i the maximum 1080p recording time depends on the size of the card. 8GB = 22 minutes, 16GB = 44 minutes.
For the Canon T4i Canon does not list it by the size of the SD card but states 22 minutes at 30, 25, and 24 fps.
According to the Nikon site the D5200 maximum recording time is 20 minutes at highest quality, 29 minutes 59 seconds at normal quality.
According to the Panasonic site the g6 HD recording capabilities (AVCHD) is as follows:
Continuous Recordable Time (Motion Image)* AVCHD: Approx. 150 min with H-PS14042, H-FS1442A, H-FS14140, H-FS45150 / Approx. 140 minwith H-FS014042
Actual Recordable Time (Motion Image)* AVCHD: Approx. 75 min with H-PS14042, H-FS1442A, H-FS14140, H-FS45150 / Approx. 70 min with H-FS014042
Recording in the MP4 format reduces the recording time to just under 30 minutes.

You will need to take into consideration the temperature at the time you are recording as it will affect recording time. In other words you will need to be aware of how hot the camera gets while you are recording video.


Hi Ken - you're right about the specs above, but there's a footnote in the T5i specs you seem to have missed: "If recording time reaches 29 min. 59 sec., movie shooting stops automatically."

As far as overheating goes - I have 4 Panasonic cameras (FZ150, GH1, GH2, GH3) that I have used for hours-long continuous recording - and none of them has ever overheated.

Johnsonalpha - the Panasonic G6 is the best "DSLR type" interchangeable lens video-capable camera that you can buy in your budget range - and the only one that will record for more than 30 minutes continuously - but finding an affordable 12x optical zoom will be a challenge.

The best I can do is recommend a $498 Panasonic G6 with the 14-42mm kit lens (only one left in stock for this price at Amazon as of this post) - plus a $199 Panasonic 45-150mm zoom lens.

That will give you camera with over an hour of continuous recording and a little over 10x of zoom range for less than $700.

Again, hope that is helpful,

Bill
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November 26, 2013 5:28:15 AM

could i add a 16gb card in the canon t5i and Panasonic g6 and get more video time and also should i just skip the whole dslr stuff and just get a camcorder could you recommend me a couple good camcorder from 1000-500

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a b w Digital camera
November 26, 2013 12:59:47 PM

brunerww is right, I did miss the footnote about the T5i stopping recording video at 29 minutes 59 seconds.
Whether or not you use a DSLR or a video camera depends on your primary use of the camera. As brunerww mentioned if you want interchangeable lenses then the Panasonic may be the way to go. Camcorders with interchangeable lenses tend to be on the professional side and would be well out of your budget (mine too for that matter).
I like and use the Canon 32GB VIXIA HF G20 Full HD Camcorder (currently $899 at B&H Photo and a kit for $969.95 on Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/HF-G20-Camcorder-Focus-Camera/dp/...). It has some nice manual controls and has a mic input and headphone jack. It also has dual SD card slots for even more storage. However, if you want to shoot at 60p for action shots then it won't be the camera for you.
What will you primarily be using the camera for?
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November 26, 2013 5:01:12 PM

can i record 29 minutes of video then export that to my video editing software then record another 29 minutes?
and is it ok to use the t5i as the video camera or is that kinda stupid
and does the t5i have a expandable memory card so i get more minutes of video?
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a b w Digital camera
November 26, 2013 7:05:03 PM

It's not stupid to use the T5i to shoot video. Once the 29 minute 59 second limit is reached you can resume shooting by pressing the record button and a new recording will start. You shouldn't have to transfer the video from the card first unless the card is full. I see no reason you could not use a 32GB or 64GB SD card in the T5i.
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Best solution

November 27, 2013 3:34:18 AM

kenrivers said:
It's not stupid to use the T5i to shoot video. Once the 29 minute 59 second limit is reached you can resume shooting by pressing the record button and a new recording will start. You shouldn't have to transfer the video from the card first unless the card is full. I see no reason you could not use a 32GB or 64GB SD card in the T5i.


I use a 128GB card in my GH3 and you can put large cards in Canons too, so the size of the card is not the problem.

The problem, as Ken says, is the T5i *shuts itself off* after 29 minutes and 59 seconds of continuous recording and has to be restarted. This is no big deal for people who shoot shorter clips and edit them together. You can shoot hours and hours of clips on the T5i, pull the card out, put it in your computer, and edit your clips together to make your 50 minute movie.

This limitation is a very big deal, however, for people who record concerts, plays, speeches, wedding ceremonies, etc. I have answered many questions from frustrated Canon DSLR buyers who are shocked when their cameras shut down in the middle of a wedding.

If you want long continuous video and a viewfinder that actually works while you're shooting video (unlike a T5i), you should get a camcorder (the $899 Canon HF G20 is a good choice below $1000, so is the $780 Panasonic X920, which shoots 1080/60p for fast action or slow motion).

If you want long continuous video, a viewfinder that works while you're shooting video, the shallow depth of field DSLR "look", the flexibility of interchangeable lenses and 1080/60p, get a $498 (as of this post) Panasonic G6.

Good luck and Happy Thanksgiving!

Bill
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a b w Digital camera
November 27, 2013 6:01:03 AM

It basically comes down to how you are going to use it. As brunerww mentioned if you want the DSLR (shallow depth of field) look then go with his recommendation of the Panasonic G6. The interchangeable lenses will give you the ability to expand later and get a wider variety of looks. I own a T4i and would not consider using it for anything but short clips.
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November 27, 2013 3:25:41 PM

im going to use the t5i for like 8 short 3-5 minute clips not whole movies and stuff
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a b w Digital camera
November 27, 2013 8:57:33 PM

For short clips like that the T5i should be fine. Are you going to go with the T5i?
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March 9, 2014 12:22:25 PM

brunerww said:
kenrivers said:
For the Canon T5i the maximum 1080p recording time depends on the size of the card. 8GB = 22 minutes, 16GB = 44 minutes.
For the Canon T4i Canon does not list it by the size of the SD card but states 22 minutes at 30, 25, and 24 fps.
According to the Nikon site the D5200 maximum recording time is 20 minutes at highest quality, 29 minutes 59 seconds at normal quality.
According to the Panasonic site the g6 HD recording capabilities (AVCHD) is as follows:
Continuous Recordable Time (Motion Image)* AVCHD: Approx. 150 min with H-PS14042, H-FS1442A, H-FS14140, H-FS45150 / Approx. 140 minwith H-FS014042
Actual Recordable Time (Motion Image)* AVCHD: Approx. 75 min with H-PS14042, H-FS1442A, H-FS14140, H-FS45150 / Approx. 70 min with H-FS014042
Recording in the MP4 format reduces the recording time to just under 30 minutes.

You will need to take into consideration the temperature at the time you are recording as it will affect recording time. In other words you will need to be aware of how hot the camera gets while you are recording video.


Hi Ken - you're right about the specs above, but there's a footnote in the T5i specs you seem to have missed: "If recording time reaches 29 min. 59 sec., movie shooting stops automatically."

As far as overheating goes - I have 4 Panasonic cameras (FZ150, GH1, GH2, GH3) that I have used for hours-long continuous recording - and none of them has ever overheated.

Johnsonalpha - the Panasonic G6 is the best "DSLR type" interchangeable lens video-capable camera that you can buy in your budget range - and the only one that will record for more than 30 minutes continuously - but finding an affordable 12x optical zoom will be a challenge.

The best I can do is recommend a $498 Panasonic G6 with the 14-42mm kit lens (only one left in stock for this price at Amazon as of this post) - plus a $199 Panasonic 45-150mm zoom lens.

That will give you camera with over an hour of continuous recording and a little over 10x of zoom range for less than $700.

Again, hope that is helpful,

Bill


The reason the camera stops recording is because of EU rules on cameras / camcorders. If a camera records more than 29 mins 59 secs it's classed as a camcorder and is subject to different taxation. HOWEVER the T5i (and all other new canon cameras) camera Immediately starts a new recording. There is no interruption in either video or sound. If for example you recorded a 32 min clip it would be in two parts. In camera it will play as one clip. When you import it, it will be split in to two files. When you put them into your editor with the files back to back you will have no gaps or interruption at all when you play them back.
I have a Canon 650D and an EOS M. None of them have ever over heated. The EOS M can be bought for as little as £280 in the UK with the kit zoom and is awesome for video if you're not wanting to go full frame.

I hope this helps
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