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Need good Gaming desktop build ($2500 (AUD) budget)

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December 5, 2013 7:22:50 AM

Hi my name is Matt and I'm 16, turning 17, which is when this new PC comes in :) , I've recently gotten into PC gaming, although I've been making do with my MacBook, which is frustrating as hell, never reaching high fps rates for any of my games at lowest graphic levels. I'd like to have a fast desktop that can run games at maximum graphics while also holding very good fps. As already stated, I'm 16 and new to PC gaming and basically have no clue what any of the parts in a PC actually do (still no clue what over clocking is after googling haha). I'm also from Australia so I was thinking I would be using this Australia based website to order my desktop:

http://www.ple.com.au/ViewKit.aspx?KitId=610104

Needing merely to pick out the required parts and have them build it for me, as I would most likely break something in any attempt myself, being the spud I am.
If you believe parts that aren't available on that website would be better suited or you simply can't be bothered going through the site that is fine any recommendations would be appreciated regardless of its availability to the mentioned source.

Note: Games I would most likely play on the Desktop would be League of Legends, WoW, probably Battlefield, games along those lines. I do have a keyboard, mouse and monitor but any recommendations for a keyboard and mouse would also be nice, although do not include this in the original $2500 budget.

Overall I'm looking for:
-Top Graphics
-Very good fps
-No lag
-Realistic memory for a gaming desktop
-Something near futureproof, long lasting.

Sorry for the lengthy thread and my lack of knowledge, thank you for reading, any help would be appreciated.
December 5, 2013 7:49:00 AM

M Nags said:
Hi my name is Matt and I'm 16, turning 17, which is when this new PC comes in :) , I've recently gotten into PC gaming, although I've been making do with my MacBook, which is frustrating as hell, never reaching high fps rates for any of my games at lowest graphic levels. I'd like to have a fast desktop that can run games at maximum graphics while also holding very good fps. As already stated, I'm 16 and new to PC gaming and basically have no clue what any of the parts in a PC actually do (still no clue what over clocking is after googling haha). I'm also from Australia so I was thinking I would be using this Australia based website to order my desktop:

http://www.ple.com.au/ViewKit.aspx?KitId=610104

Needing merely to pick out the required parts and have them build it for me, as I would most likely break something in any attempt myself, being the spud I am.
If you believe parts that aren't available on that website would be better suited or you simply can't be bothered going through the site that is fine any recommendations would be appreciated regardless of its availability to the mentioned source.

Note: Games I would most likely play on the Desktop would be League of Legends, WoW, probably Battlefield, games along those lines. I do have a keyboard, mouse and monitor but any recommendations for a keyboard and mouse would also be nice, although do not include this in the original $2500 budget.

Overall I'm looking for:
-Top Graphics
-Very good fps
-No lag
-Realistic memory for a gaming desktop
-Something near futureproof, long lasting.

Sorry for the lengthy thread and my lack of knowledge, thank you for reading, any help would be appreciated.



Great post here, and welcome! I took your generous budget of $2500 and built this:

http://s28.postimg.org/3wmqx7g65/loadout.jpg
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December 5, 2013 7:53:00 AM

legokill101 said:
ok im using pc part picker cuase it finds the best prices here is my insaine build http://au.pcpartpicker.com/p/2frvC


This looks really cool thanks man, by the way just for my knowledge, probably a dumb question, why do people bother with two video cards instead of one very expensive one? Just wondering, again thanks for the effort man definitely looking at this :~)
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a b 4 Gaming
December 5, 2013 7:54:48 AM

Alright. Just so as you know, this setup is going to cost a lot more than if you were to build it yourself. I highly suggest you look up Newegg or NCIX's videos on how to build a computer - it's actually a lot easier than you would imagine.

Here's what I would do:
Processor - i5-4570
Cooler - Corsair H100i
Motherboard - AsRock H87M-ITX
RAM - Gg.Skill 2x4GB Cs9, 1600MHz
OS Drive - Samsung 840 EVO, 120GB
Storage Drive - Western Digital Blue 1TB
Graphics Card - EVGA GTX 780ti, the non-ACX cooler (you want the heat blowing out the back)
Optical Drive - The cheapest one. If you need a CD drive.
Sound Card - none; your motherboard sound will be fine, and you don't have any room for a sound card
Case - BitFenix Prodigy mITX gaming case
PSU - Antec TruePower 560w
Wireless - none; a wired connection will be faster and more reliable
Operating system - Windows 8 is great if you remove the metro apps. If that's too much work and you don't want to do any customizing, get windows 7 home premium.
Office - if you want to have office pre-installed, get office 2013, NOT the new one you have to subscribe to.
Antivirus - I don't like any of their solutions. Use windows defender (already installed in windows 8, can download it for free from microsoft for windows 7) and a $15 lifetime licence to Malwarebytes Pro.
Keyboard - If you want to spend about $100 on a mechanical keyboard, talk to me. It'll last for years, and feels like typing on a cloud of boobs. (If not, the microsoft wired desktop 600 is a fine choice; keyboards are mostly the same aside from mechanical ones.)
Mouse - Razer Deathadder. I would suggest not buying from them and getting a deathadder black edition; it's a very well designed mouse, and the black edition is slightly sturdier.
Monitor - BenQ 24" Full HD 2Ms monitor
Speakers - Logitech 2.1 channel

This will get you a very good computer that also happens to be SMALL as gaming computers go, and has handles. This might not matter now, but in two years when you go off to college, you'll be thanking me.

Again, I reiterate that building it yourself is fun, is much cheaper, lets you be very proud of what you've done, and isn't that hard at all.
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December 5, 2013 7:59:18 AM

magmcbride said:
M Nags said:
Hi my name is Matt and I'm 16, turning 17, which is when this new PC comes in :) , I've recently gotten into PC gaming, although I've been making do with my MacBook, which is frustrating as hell, never reaching high fps rates for any of my games at lowest graphic levels. I'd like to have a fast desktop that can run games at maximum graphics while also holding very good fps. As already stated, I'm 16 and new to PC gaming and basically have no clue what any of the parts in a PC actually do (still no clue what over clocking is after googling haha). I'm also from Australia so I was thinking I would be using this Australia based website to order my desktop:

http://www.ple.com.au/ViewKit.aspx?KitId=610104

Needing merely to pick out the required parts and have them build it for me, as I would most likely break something in any attempt myself, being the spud I am.
If you believe parts that aren't available on that website would be better suited or you simply can't be bothered going through the site that is fine any recommendations would be appreciated regardless of its availability to the mentioned source.

Note: Games I would most likely play on the Desktop would be League of Legends, WoW, probably Battlefield, games along those lines. I do have a keyboard, mouse and monitor but any recommendations for a keyboard and mouse would also be nice, although do not include this in the original $2500 budget.

Overall I'm looking for:
-Top Graphics
-Very good fps
-No lag
-Realistic memory for a gaming desktop
-Something near futureproof, long lasting.

Sorry for the lengthy thread and my lack of knowledge, thank you for reading, any help would be appreciated.



Great post here, and welcome! I took your generous budget of $2500 and built this:

http://s28.postimg.org/3wmqx7g65/loadout.jpg


Thank you! I really like the build thanks man, the response time on this site it amazing haha thank you again.
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a b 4 Gaming
December 5, 2013 8:01:51 AM

Just throwing out there, the other builds above are spending money in places you don't want it. For example, both those builds spent money to get an unlocked processor and a motherboard that can overclock - which you probably don't want to be doing until you've done a lot more research and likely built a computer yourself. They're also going to be large and heavy, and have a few other things that I would nitpick on. (Specifically, in magmcbride's rig, you could easily get more graphics power, have no use for a blu-ray drive [they're hideous to use on a PC anyways], has too large of a PSU, and uses an arguably worse operating system. [Though it doesn't have a learning curve; both OS's will coming from a Mac.] Oh, and it doesn't have a case. :p  In legokill101's suggestion, he went with an SSD I wouldn't consider that reliable, SLI video cards, which are going to be a pain sometimes and are more likely to give you problems, and again, a large, heavy case.)

To answer your question, running two graphics cards in SLI or Crossfire can often give better performance for less money when compared to a single more expensive card. However, it relies on driver support, has issues, uses much more power and space, and produces more heat. And just throwing out there, a $630 card is pretty much considered "very expensive." ;P

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December 5, 2013 8:07:18 AM

DarkSable said:
Alright. Just so as you know, this setup is going to cost a lot more than if you were to build it yourself. I highly suggest you look up Newegg or NCIX's videos on how to build a computer - it's actually a lot easier than you would imagine.

Here's what I would do:
Processor - i5-4570
Cooler - Corsair H100i
Motherboard - AsRock H87M-ITX
RAM - Gg.Skill 2x4GB Cs9, 1600MHz
OS Drive - Samsung 840 EVO, 120GB
Storage Drive - Western Digital Blue 1TB
Graphics Card - EVGA GTX 780ti, the non-ACX cooler (you want the heat blowing out the back)
Optical Drive - The cheapest one. If you need a CD drive.
Sound Card - none; your motherboard sound will be fine, and you don't have any room for a sound card
Case - BitFenix Prodigy mITX gaming case
PSU - Antec TruePower 560w
Wireless - none; a wired connection will be faster and more reliable
Operating system - Windows 8 is great if you remove the metro apps. If that's too much work and you don't want to do any customizing, get windows 7 home premium.
Office - if you want to have office pre-installed, get office 2013, NOT the new one you have to subscribe to.
Antivirus - I don't like any of their solutions. Use windows defender (already installed in windows 8, can download it for free from microsoft for windows 7) and a $15 lifetime licence to Malwarebytes Pro.
Keyboard - If you want to spend about $100 on a mechanical keyboard, talk to me. It'll last for years, and feels like typing on a cloud of boobs. (If not, the microsoft wired desktop 600 is a fine choice; keyboards are mostly the same aside from mechanical ones.)
Mouse - Razer Deathadder. I would suggest not buying from them and getting a deathadder black edition; it's a very well designed mouse, and the black edition is slightly sturdier.
Monitor - BenQ 24" Full HD 2Ms monitor
Speakers - Logitech 2.1 channel

This will get you a very good computer that also happens to be SMALL as gaming computers go, and has handles. This might not matter now, but in two years when you go off to college, you'll be thanking me.

Again, I reiterate that building it yourself is fun, is much cheaper, lets you be very proud of what you've done, and isn't that hard at all.


Hmm yes if I'm honest I really would like to build it myself it's just I'd hate to kill my birthday present haha, I'll follow what you said and look up just how hard it is but you have leaned me towards building it myself it's just a matter of getting all the parts to my house in one piece that worries me. Your build is very convincing though and you've obviously put a fair amount of effort into this and I thank you. :) 
Also, you have quickly got me interested with the mechanical-boob-keyboard, how does it differ with other keyboards and what would you suggest? Also I've heard similair things with that mouse and will most likely get it now, again thank you. Overall this is probably what I'm leaning towards, cheers.
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December 5, 2013 8:12:10 AM

DarkSable said:
Just throwing out there, the other builds above are spending money in places you don't want it. For example, both those builds spent money to get an unlocked processor and a motherboard that can overclock - which you probably don't want to be doing until you've done a lot more research and likely built a computer yourself. They're also going to be large and heavy, and have a few other things that I would nitpick on. (Specifically, in magmcbride's rig, you could easily get more graphics power, have no use for a blu-ray drive [they're hideous to use on a PC anyways], has too large of a PSU, and uses an arguably worse operating system. [Though it doesn't have a learning curve; both OS's will coming from a Mac.] Oh, and it doesn't have a case. :p  In legokill101's suggestion, he went with an SSD I wouldn't consider that reliable, SLI video cards, which are going to be a pain sometimes and are more likely to give you problems, and again, a large, heavy case.)

To answer your question, running two graphics cards in SLI or Crossfire can often give better performance for less money when compared to a single more expensive card. However, it relies on driver support, has issues, uses much more power and space, and produces more heat. And just throwing out there, a $630 card is pretty much considered "very expensive." ;P



Haha I'm liking you, yeah I understand what you're saying with the other suggestions now, and thanks for the teaching point, I will assume you suggest the "very expensive" one over two then, and yeah I thought it was expensive but then discovered there were others nearly double that price on the same list so got a bit confused. Again thank you :) 
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a b 4 Gaming
December 5, 2013 8:20:45 AM

If you get parts that have decent warranties and buy from a place with a reliable return policy, you're fine - you won't kill it. It's actually pretty hard to damage a part physically without say, spilling water on it then turning it on. As for putting the computer itself together, it's deceptively easy; think of it like LEGOs for adults, except better, because each part only fits in the right place.

Haha, thought that would attract your attention. ;) 
Basically most standard keyboards are "membrane," meaning they have a sheet of rubber with domes in it. When a key is pressed, the dome flattens, connecting a circuit. The trouble with these is that they're mushy, and if you press a lot of keys at once, they won't all register, because the keyboard only knows what key is being pressed by what cross lines are connected.
Mechanical keyboards have a physical mechanism under each key that makes the circuit, so they don't have an issue with multiple key presses, they feel much, much better and more precise when you're typing, and they last a LOT longer. The downside is that they're expensive, as keyboards go. I would suggest you do a little research into the types of switches, and see if it's something you'd be interested in.

Of course; I'm glad my advice is helpful.

As for that second bit - yes, I do suggest the single GPU. The one you're talking about is probably a GTX titan. The 780ti will come very close to its performance for a lot less money; the reason the titan is so expensive is that when it was released, it was head and shoulders above everything else. Still expensive, but powerful. Not a good option anymore, though.
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December 5, 2013 8:32:33 AM

Oh that's reassuring, in putting the pieces together should I expect, like, instructions for each piece? or would I be able to figure it out with a little help from google/youtube? Haha I'm proud of myself for understanding what you said about the keyboards (even if it was toned down ten fold) because I actually have noticed what you said about the traditional keyboards a large number of times, and so these mechanical keyboards are appealing, I'll look into it. Thanks for clarifying in regards to the video card and you were right in your assumption so props to you :) 
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a b 4 Gaming
December 5, 2013 9:04:04 AM

Your motherboard will have a manual that will tell you how to put everything in, which you should use to look up where on your specific manual things go.

However, here's what I HIGHLY recommend every first-time build does. Go to youtube, and watch the video on how to put a computer together by Newegg and the one by NCIX. Figure out which one you like better. Then when you go to build your computer, right before you do it, watch the video again... then restart it, and go step by step, pausing the video to do each task. It helps keep you on track and makes the whole process a LOT easier.

In that case, I highly suggest you look at mechanical keyboard. Mine has MX blacks, which are the worst for typing because they have a higher actuation force, but going from a good mechanical keyboard (with hands used to an ergonomic keyboard) to that, within a few minutes, my words per minute had risen by about twenty. I do get some fatigue while writing an essay, however, so I would look at MX blues or browns if you're going to be a student for a while. (You'll know what that means as soon as you google switch types; it's a lot easier to read an article that has images and such to explain what the different switches do than if I were to try to explain it.)

And of course, again, I'm glad to answer any question you might throw my way. Also, just throwing out there back on the subject of keyboards. You might be tempted by "gaming" branded keyboards that come with macro keys. Don't bother, they're an absolute waste. Instead, make sure you get a full keyboard, and then use a free program called AutoHotKey to turn your numberpad into a free hotpad. It's pretty easy to figure out the basics, but the program can do very complicated tasks once you figure out how to ask it to. I play a few MMOs, and have my numberpad to automatically detect what MMO I'm playing, to use the numbers as the hotbar keys, to use plus and minus to scroll through hotbars, to use other buttons as macros for doing things like automatically casting my buffs one after the other with the exact right time in between or as a modifier to cast heals no matter what hotbar is active. Very useful.
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December 5, 2013 8:46:07 PM

DarkSable said:
Your motherboard will have a manual that will tell you how to put everything in, which you should use to look up where on your specific manual things go.

However, here's what I HIGHLY recommend every first-time build does. Go to youtube, and watch the video on how to put a computer together by Newegg and the one by NCIX. Figure out which one you like better. Then when you go to build your computer, right before you do it, watch the video again... then restart it, and go step by step, pausing the video to do each task. It helps keep you on track and makes the whole process a LOT easier.

In that case, I highly suggest you look at mechanical keyboard. Mine has MX blacks, which are the worst for typing because they have a higher actuation force, but going from a good mechanical keyboard (with hands used to an ergonomic keyboard) to that, within a few minutes, my words per minute had risen by about twenty. I do get some fatigue while writing an essay, however, so I would look at MX blues or browns if you're going to be a student for a while. (You'll know what that means as soon as you google switch types; it's a lot easier to read an article that has images and such to explain what the different switches do than if I were to try to explain it.)

And of course, again, I'm glad to answer any question you might throw my way. Also, just throwing out there back on the subject of keyboards. You might be tempted by "gaming" branded keyboards that come with macro keys. Don't bother, they're an absolute waste. Instead, make sure you get a full keyboard, and then use a free program called AutoHotKey to turn your numberpad into a free hotpad. It's pretty easy to figure out the basics, but the program can do very complicated tasks once you figure out how to ask it to. I play a few MMOs, and have my numberpad to automatically detect what MMO I'm playing, to use the numbers as the hotbar keys, to use plus and minus to scroll through hotbars, to use other buttons as macros for doing things like automatically casting my buffs one after the other with the exact right time in between or as a modifier to cast heals no matter what hotbar is active. Very useful.


Awesome, okay yeah I'll build it and yes I've now watched both videos now and it doesn't seem to hard, yeah I did some research and think I want MX browns and thanks for the warning on the "gaming" keyboards and that program does sound useful. I was also wondering what you would recommend in regards to power protection, or does it not matter. Finally, purchasing from that website all up the parts you recommended (not including the mouse and keyboard) cost about $2300, does this sound reasonable to you or do you know of somewhere else I could purchase them for less? Again, thanks.
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December 5, 2013 10:05:36 PM

Or buy all the parts take it to a pc store and have them build it. That's what I'm doing lol. Costs a extra $100 and they install the OS and save me the worry.
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a b 4 Gaming
December 5, 2013 11:13:17 PM

Browns are supposed to be very nice, yeah.

As for power protection, yes, it absolutely does matter. I keep my computer (and 3 monitors) behind a 2200 J surge protector, and have another for my sound system and a third for the tv and associated boxes.

If you do get power outages often (I don't, just power surges and dirty power), then I would splurge and get a UPS; basically a battery backup that gives you a few minutes to save your work and shut down safely when the power goes out.

You do want to make sure you get a reliable surge protector and that it also has ports for your Ethernet connection. If you want to be very fancy, there are surge protectors that also filter and clean the power coming in, but that'll be a lot more expensive.

As for finding the best deal, consider looking at pcpartpicker.au - plug your parts in and it'll search your major online retailers for the best deals. Just bear in mind that you want to buy from some place with a decent return policy in case you get a part that's dead on arrival. It happens sometimes, and sucks, but doesn't hurt you if you did buy from a place that treats their customers well.

As for Execute's suggestion, that is an option, but building a computer really isn't that hard, nor is installing the OS.
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December 6, 2013 12:31:25 AM

DarkSable said:
Browns are supposed to be very nice, yeah.

As for power protection, yes, it absolutely does matter. I keep my computer (and 3 monitors) behind a 2200 J surge protector, and have another for my sound system and a third for the tv and associated boxes.

If you do get power outages often (I don't, just power surges and dirty power), then I would splurge and get a UPS; basically a battery backup that gives you a few minutes to save your work and shut down safely when the power goes out.

You do want to make sure you get a reliable surge protector and that it also has ports for your Ethernet connection. If you want to be very fancy, there are surge protectors that also filter and clean the power coming in, but that'll be a lot more expensive.

As for finding the best deal, consider looking at pcpartpicker.au - plug your parts in and it'll search your major online retailers for the best deals. Just bear in mind that you want to buy from some place with a decent return policy in case you get a part that's dead on arrival. It happens sometimes, and sucks, but doesn't hurt you if you did buy from a place that treats their customers well.

As for Execute's suggestion, that is an option, but building a computer really isn't that hard, nor is installing the OS.


Yeah I think I'm set on building it, it'd be fun, what would you recommend in regards to power protection for my build? I don't get many power outages so that should be fine. Also, pcpartpicker actually seems a lot better than PLE due to the added variety it seems to give, would you change the build in anyway now that I'm looking here? (sorry lol)
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a b 4 Gaming
December 6, 2013 12:41:28 PM

In that case, a good surge protector is all you need. It'll run you about $40 - it should have 1800 J or more of protection, and make sure it's not one of those "energy saving" ones that cuts power to all outlets unless the main one is in use; they're really annoying.

I actually wouldn't change all that much; only things I might look at options for are motherboards and the PSU, but both of them are fine already. PC part picker has basically all modern parts, period. The only downside is that they don't actually sell them.
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December 6, 2013 5:31:47 PM

DarkSable said:
In that case, a good surge protector is all you need. It'll run you about $40 - it should have 1800 J or more of protection, and make sure it's not one of those "energy saving" ones that cuts power to all outlets unless the main one is in use; they're really annoying.

I actually wouldn't change all that much; only things I might look at options for are motherboards and the PSU, but both of them are fine already. PC part picker has basically all modern parts, period. The only downside is that they don't actually sell them.


Okay yeah I've found one from PLE, alright first thanks for all your help and I swear this is the last one lol, so this is what my order looks like at the moment, could you just let me know if there's anything out of place before I order it? Thanks again man.

http://s24.postimg.org/fs7kh60c5/Screen_shot_2013_12_07...

(Surge Protector is there just below)
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a b 4 Gaming
December 6, 2013 7:35:36 PM

I'm more than happy to help, mate - that's what I'm here for. :) 

First of all, don't bother getting the 4670K. The only thing the 'k' means is that it can overclock. I suggest going with a plain 4670 or 4570.

Also, know that you don't have to have the cooler; it'll just let your computer run much quieter; it's expensive in AUD. I would drop the cooler and just run stock - it'll be noiser, but much cheaper. (Yes, I know I recommended it in the first place. :p  ) The other option, if you're interested in overclocking, is keeping the cooler and -K cpu and getting a z87 motherboard so you can overclock.

Check how long that power supply is for me now - I just remembered that I had hell with the first PSU in my prodigy because it was 160mm long and the prodigy needs a 140mm long PSU so you have room to route cables comfortably. A 160mm is fine, though - you can use motherboard spacers to set off the PSU out the back of the case a little.

Don't bother buying windows 8 professional - it has nothing you need over windows 8 home.

Consider buying the normal deathadder black; it's built a little better.

I personally don't like the part of the Das Keyboard that sticks up like that, so I bought a Leopold from the UK. Up to you.

Also, I wouldn't go with those speakers; they're an older model and you'll actually get better sound out of the LS21 for half the price.
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December 7, 2013 7:09:21 AM

DarkSable said:
I'm more than happy to help, mate - that's what I'm here for. :) 

First of all, don't bother getting the 4670K. The only thing the 'k' means is that it can overclock. I suggest going with a plain 4670 or 4570.

Also, know that you don't have to have the cooler; it'll just let your computer run much quieter; it's expensive in AUD. I would drop the cooler and just run stock - it'll be noiser, but much cheaper. (Yes, I know I recommended it in the first place. :p  ) The other option, if you're interested in overclocking, is keeping the cooler and -K cpu and getting a z87 motherboard so you can overclock.

Check how long that power supply is for me now - I just remembered that I had hell with the first PSU in my prodigy because it was 160mm long and the prodigy needs a 140mm long PSU so you have room to route cables comfortably. A 160mm is fine, though - you can use motherboard spacers to set off the PSU out the back of the case a little.

Don't bother buying windows 8 professional - it has nothing you need over windows 8 home.

Consider buying the normal deathadder black; it's built a little better.

I personally don't like the part of the Das Keyboard that sticks up like that, so I bought a Leopold from the UK. Up to you.

Also, I wouldn't go with those speakers; they're an older model and you'll actually get better sound out of the LS21 for half the price.


Alright, firstly do you recommend overclocking? Is it worth it? And if you do, would I, with zero computers experience, be able to set that up without too much trouble?

If no to any of that, and I were to not overclock I'd still like the computer to not be too noisy so would a budget cooler still help? (I've assumed yes and included one that was given good ratings below)

I've made two shopping carts one for if I overclock one for if I don't, there is a substancial price difference between the two so I was just wondering if it worth it thanks here you go:

Overclock: http://s27.postimg.org/ptg4cnycz/Screen_shot_2013_12_07... ($2547.98)

No Overclocking: http://s14.postimg.org/dm46c8681/Screen_shot_2013_12_07... ($2363.98)

By the way I found this on the psu not sure if it helps sorry

Unit Dimensions:
- 86 mm (H) x 150 mm (W) x 150 mm (D)
is 150 bad?
found here: http://www.itsdirect.com.au/products/Antec-True-Power-C...

And on the cables topic I won't need to buy any will I all needed cables will come with the parts yeah?

Thanks again mate nearly there haha
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a b 4 Gaming
December 7, 2013 11:29:15 AM

Overclocking can easily get you 20-30% extra performance. Whether it's worth it or not is up to you. You would be able to set it up, yes, but it would require that you do a fair bit of research into how to do it properly. Yes, a budget cooler would still help with noise even running at stock, for sure.

There's a difference of almost $200 between them, which I would call significant. Instead of using the 212 EVO, I would consider a low profile cooler like the GeminII S524, which you can buy an aftermarket 140mm fan for - the larger the fan, the quieter it'll be.

150mm should be fine - it might be a little cramped getting the cables in there, but the fact that it's not modular will help with that.

Yes, you'll have all the cables you need, though I personally like to splurge on a pack of zip-ties; it makes the cable management so much easier. You don't need a lot; a 25 pack should be enough for the computer and monitor wires.

Oh, and just a note, on the Leopold keyboard, it's more expensive, so consider if that's worth it to you over the Das Keyboard; truely it's just a matter of looks to me.
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December 7, 2013 2:07:12 PM

DarkSable said:
Overclocking can easily get you 20-30% extra performance. Whether it's worth it or not is up to you. You would be able to set it up, yes, but it would require that you do a fair bit of research into how to do it properly. Yes, a budget cooler would still help with noise even running at stock, for sure.

There's a difference of almost $200 between them, which I would call significant. Instead of using the 212 EVO, I would consider a low profile cooler like the GeminII S524, which you can buy an aftermarket 140mm fan for - the larger the fan, the quieter it'll be.

150mm should be fine - it might be a little cramped getting the cables in there, but the fact that it's not modular will help with that.

Yes, you'll have all the cables you need, though I personally like to splurge on a pack of zip-ties; it makes the cable management so much easier. You don't need a lot; a 25 pack should be enough for the computer and monitor wires.

Oh, and just a note, on the Leopold keyboard, it's more expensive, so consider if that's worth it to you over the Das Keyboard; truely it's just a matter of looks to me.


Okay cool, if it's that significant I think I'll try overclock. Yeah I ended up going back with the Das because I'm not really fussed with what it looks like and yeah thanks for the zip-ties tip, sounds handy, I'll invest in some. Alright so if overclocking doesn't look too hard after some reasearch I should be done thanks a bunch again man :)  I'll let you know if I need anything else you've been a massive help so again cheers mate.
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December 7, 2013 2:12:40 PM

Of course, glad I could help!

I warn you, though - overclocking is addictive. You're going to keep wanting to get just a little bit more out of your chip, and then you'll end up falling for the watercooling bug, and once you have that, it's over. :p 
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