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Windows on SSD How to put everything else on HDD

Tags:
  • Windows
  • SSD
  • Hard Drives
  • Windows 7
Last response: in Windows 7
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December 5, 2013 10:45:49 AM

This is a brand new build, I have windows on my SSD. I am looking to put everything else on my 1tb HDD but everything is going straight to my SSD. It seems like this should be an easy fix but for some reason I can't find the solution.

More about : windows ssd put hdd

a b $ Windows 7
December 5, 2013 10:51:18 AM

What do you mean by "everything"? When you go to save/install something just pick the location you want it (on the hdd).
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a b $ Windows 7
December 5, 2013 10:51:22 AM

I'm not quite sure what the problem is.

- Windows will be installed on the SSD which has the drive letter "C:"

- your HDD is probably "E:" drive (the DVD drive usually shows as "D" when a disc is inserted)

- you can create FOLDERS on the HDD

- when you INSTALL PROGRAMS, you choose a custom install method from the setup utility and then manually choose the folder such as "E:\Media" or for non-Steam games "E:\GAMES\Half Life" (install all games into same "GAMES" root folder on E-drive).

- for STEAM GAMES, you should install Steam to the HDD (i.e. "E:\STEAM") and then it will automatically download and install onto your HDD.
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a b $ Windows 7
December 5, 2013 10:51:37 AM

Hello... create folders on your HD "Program Files" "Program Files (x86)"... Choose Advanced or Custom install, when installing programs, and direct them to these Folders... there is no automatic method or setting at this time.
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December 5, 2013 10:56:29 AM

Sorry, I have been up for the past 24 hours due to work and I am trying to get this computer set up and ready before I go to sleep. What I am trying to do here is have nothing else on my SSD and I would like to somehow default the HDD as my drive for any other storage, music games movies and everything else.
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a b $ Windows 7
December 5, 2013 10:57:27 AM

Other:
1) I wouldn't bother installing programs to the HDD unless they are large (like games) and space is a problem. You also don't have to designate the folder as "Program Files (x86)" on another drive, you can call it whatever you like.

2) You can remove the Hibernation file (Google that) if you need more space. Obviously Hibernate won't work.

3) You can reduce (don't remove) the Pagefile by setting its Max and Min. I recommend 2GB for both (Google how).

4) You really should OVERPROVISION the SSD (Samsung Magician can do it for you. I'm not sure about other SSD's.) It uses about 15% of the space but then it's hidden. If you fill up an SSD without overprovisioning applied it really slows down a lot.
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Best solution

February 3, 2014 9:14:33 AM

I just happened to stumble across this older post and it doesn't seem like you were really given a viable in-depth solution. Here's my advice:

Step one:
Use this to keep only the OS, drivers, and some important apps on the SSD.
http://lifehacker.com/5467758/move-the-users-directory-...

Step two
Use this to optimize the capacity and speed of the SSD.
http://forums.mydigitallife.info/threads/36440-Windows-...

Step three
Use this to do a full optimization of the system.
http://www.overclock.net/t/1156654/seans-windows-7-inst...

The first link is by far the most important. Simply put, the users folder gets very large and takes up a lot of space. Moving that to the HDD and creating a softlink in the SSD tricks the system into thinking the users folder is in the same spot it should be on the SSD. In actuality the data is being stored on the HDD.

You can use this same process for the Program Files and Program Files (x86) folders once you have installed what you wanted to in the SSD. Note: once you do this you will not be able to install to those specific SSD folders unless you undo what you have done. I would recommend that if you did, just make a folder named something else (for example C:\Games) and install things to there rather than program files. This is helpful when programs don't ask you where they want to install and when you just want to breeze through installing lots of stuff.

Be sure to do step one. Step two is very helpful in extending the life and efficiency of the SSD. Step three is more for your own personal reading and peace of mind and is not necessary unless you would like to learn more about these things.
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