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SSD Longevity, Win 8.1 and Fast Start-Up - Am I looking at this right?

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December 5, 2013 1:19:35 PM

You may be aware that Win 8/8.1 offers Fast Startup, which is a type of hybrid hibernate that writes large files to the SSD whenever the system is shut down and allows the system to start back up in 10 - 20 seconds. A side effect from this benefit, due to the large page file written during shutdown is I write to my SSD ~27GB per day, or nearly 7TB per year. Initially this freaked me out because it made me think I would quickly kill me SSD. However...

I have a 256GB SSD. Based on multiple SSD torture tests I've seen on the web it looks like the SSDs of today can do 2K - 3K writes before dying... so my math says 256GB x 2000 writes = 512TB before the SSD craps out. Following this logic, 512TB / 7TB annual writes = 73 years before SSD failure (due to write capacity). Does this sound about right? Even 1/2 or 1/3 that capacity and the SSD will well out-live the system's practical life.

In summary, it is my belief that even 27GB or 50GB per day SSD writes should be of no concern to me relative to SSD longevity. Am I making any errant assumptions here? Or does my logic hold?
a b G Storage
December 5, 2013 1:23:51 PM

why take the chance anyway? the speed increase in the boot time is small (it still needs to load the data from the ssd back in memory). instead give s3 sleep a chance (bios - sleep mode s3) and start run cmd - powercfg -h off and then try the sleep command.

s3 sleep is all components off except for ram. it loads back instantly and nothing is written to the ssd.
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December 5, 2013 1:52:16 PM

laviniuc said:
why take the chance anyway? the speed increase in the boot time is small (it still needs to load the data from the ssd back in memory). instead give s3 sleep a chance (bios - sleep mode s3) and start run cmd - powercfg -h off and then try the sleep command.

s3 sleep is all components off except for ram. it loads back instantly and nothing is written to the ssd.


Mainly because a Win 8 shutdown/start re-initializes all drivers. That is not the case with S3... where basically the system may go weeks or more before Win updates force a restart. In my opinion (and you know what they say about opinions) going for long stretches (days and weeks) without a system restart can be unhealthy for the system.

As for "why take a chance?"... I guess the point of my post was to just confirm that my math on SSD write durability was sound. If so 73 years, or 50 years, or even 25 years durability of an SSD to me seems to be taking no chances, but am trying to validate I am evaluating the subject correctly, not trying to eek out an extra 5 seconds of start up performance.
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a c 536 G Storage
December 5, 2013 2:29:37 PM

Tseg said:
In summary, it is my belief that even 27GB or 50GB per day SSD writes should be of no concern to me relative to SSD longevity. Am I making any errant assumptions here? Or does my logic hold?


You are correct. You don't have to worry about drive longevity with current generation SSDs.
Consumer-grade SSDs have been out since 2008 (Intel X25-M). You can search this forum as well as Google & Bing and you will see thousands of posts of users whose SSD has died, but you won't find one post where the SSD has died because the user "wrote too much to it" and it "ran out of P/E" cycles.

Your SSD will die on you for reasons other than because you "enabled Fast-Startup". :) 
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