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Is there 10 Gbps or 1 Gbps Ethernet available for home network consumers?

I know Google Fiber offers internet speeds of 1000 Mbps which is just about 1 Gbps and that sounds like some extreme speed to me considering my peak download speed for a Steam game right now is 1.3 Mbps. I saw that a download speed of 1 Gbps would only take like 12 minutes to download all 28gb of COD: Ghosts, and a 10 Gbps speed would only take seconds, CAN YOU IMAGINE THAT! I cant. Anyways, I also know that professional LAN office networks usually use Gigabit ethernet speeds, but what about for home use?

Like i mentioned, there is Google Fiber, but it is only available in a handful of cities right now which are no where near me or even near California. Are there any other ways or ISP's available in the Southern Cali area that offer 1 or even 10 Gbps speeds? How common are such download speeds for home use? I also know that Verizon offers 1 Gbps speeds, but at an insane price which i cannot afford at all.

Also, would a Gigabit home network really offer better phone and tv quality like Google Fiber claims?

So any help to reach my goal of getting Gigabit Ethernet speeds for my home would be greatly appreciated. I live in Southern California btw. Thanks!

Google Fiber: https://fiber.google.com/about/
16 answers Last reply Best Answer
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  1. If you think 1Gb/s is insanely priced, you don't even want to know what 10Gb/s would cost you. Bottom line is that no matter how fast your connection is you are still constrained by the slowest link in the chain. It doesn't matter that you might have a 1Gb/s connection if the server on the other end, or an overloaded router somewhere in the middle, can only manage 500Kb/s,.
  2. I'm looking for something inside my house. I cannot stand 1GB speeds I find it to slow transferring stuff. A server at work has a fiber connection, and it rocks.

    I to am looking for a consumer 10 Gbps internal network.
  3. moulderhere said:
    I'm looking for something inside my house. I cannot stand 1GB speeds I find it to slow transferring stuff. A server at work has a fiber connection, and it rocks.

    I to am looking for a consumer 10 Gbps internal network.


    Cannot stand 1Gbps speeds? Imagine my 1Mbps speeds. I would be estatic with 1Gbps
  4. ex_bubblehead said:
    If you think 1Gb/s is insanely priced, you don't even want to know what 10Gb/s would cost you. Bottom line is that no matter how fast your connection is you are still constrained by the slowest link in the chain. It doesn't matter that you might have a 1Gb/s connection if the server on the other end, or an overloaded router somewhere in the middle, can only manage 500Kb/s,.


    I am aware of all that, I just want to see what it would cost and what services are available right now. Anything better than my speeds right now would be amazing, i cant imagine speeds of 1 Gbps, it would be like a rocketship, even 500 mbps. And 1 Gbps with Google Fiber would be affordable, but not with Verizon which is offering 500 Mbps for $300/month where as GF is offering 1000 Mbps internet, tv, and phone for like $120/ month
  5. Best answer
    There is also a huge difference in consumer grade connection compared to commercial grade connections. Commercial grade connection will have a guarantee of speed at least to the first distribution hub and many times withing their network. We have a number of 10g connections. Be aware to get a router that can actually pass 10g of traffic is big bucks. Just the optical interface costs well over $3000 and you have to have other interfaces to hook your stuff to. These routers can easily cost $25,000. I know one of the connection I happened to see the price on was $8000/month.

    Going back to your main question though why would you not think steam would artificially limit you to prevent someone who has a 10g connection from using all the bandwidth.
  6. bill001g said:
    There is also a huge difference in consumer grade connection compared to commercial grade connections. Commercial grade connection will have a guarantee of speed at least to the first distribution hub and many times withing their network. We have a number of 10g connections. Be aware to get a router that can actually pass 10g of traffic is big bucks. Just the optical interface costs well over $3000 and you have to have other interfaces to hook your stuff to. These routers can easily cost $25,000. I know one of the connection I happened to see the price on was $8000/month.

    Going back to your main question though why would you not think steam would artificially limit you to prevent someone who has a 10g connection from using all the bandwidth.


    Lets just throw out the Steam part, lets forget about the bottlenecks. I just want to know for curiosity's sake how much it would cost and if it is possible to get a home network of 1 Gbps or even up to 10 Gbps, regardless.
  7. What more do you want I already told you what we pay and this is on the low end because we already had paid to have the fiber installed for other reasons. There is no way to even estimate what it will cost. They will charge you many thousands of dollars just to give you a estimate.

    It can easily be a million dollars to bore fiber to your location depending how close to the provider rings you are and it is highly unlikely that a residential neighborhood is even close. We paid over $300,000 to have fiber run between 2 of our buildings and it was just over 3/4 of a mile.
  8. To create a LAN network that can handle 10Gbps is actually fairly easy, a $100 modem/router supports those speeds and so does CAT Ethernet cabling. But that's fine if you want to move data between two PC's both connected to your home network, downloading from the internet really depends on what plan your on and your ISP's networking.

    If there isn't any existing infrastructure to support that kind of speed in your area (thats accessible to your ISP no less), your plain out of luck. The cost of physical fiber cabling isn't even that much, but rather your going to have to dig up the ground and lay that cabling between yourself and their nearest distribution hub.

    So pretty much your only hope for fast internet speeds is that your Telco is going to lay the cabling for your neighborhood and take the brunt of the expenses out of the good of their heart and wallet, which isn't going to happen anytime soon I think :lol:. The only reason Google are doing it is because they are directly interested in people having faster connections, and to kick the Telco's in the arse to get moving with Optic Fibre.

    Also for better phone/TV quality, I assume thats based on the Netflix model where they automatically adjust streaming quality based on available bandwidth. No point trying to stream 1080p footage if your connection cant handle it.
  9. Mathematically, you can run 35Mb/s down a single 256 QAM carrier on a piece of COAX. D2 moddems which use a single QAM 256 carrier max around 35 Mb/s I have seen them hit 38Mb/s, but lets leave it at 35 Mb/s which is the average I see between 33 and 38. My FFO runs 116 QAM 256 channels down a piece of 750Mhz cable system.

    So potentially you have

    116 qams * 35Mb/s per qam = 4060 which is just under 4 Gb/s, I am going to say no as far as 1 Gb/s being better than 4 Gb/s assuming the same number of channels. Now if they run less channels and do not compress them they will look better but that's not a effect of the 1Gb/s that's an effect of better organization, however I believe the 1Gb/s is just your internet bandwidth and not the total bandwidth coming to your house, so without more info I cannot honestly answer this correctly. As Comcast's signal is certainly split between their CDV. HSI, and TV services, so not all 4Gb/s goes to TV, its really getting too complex to get a clear picture with the info I have available, its possible but not plausible at this point in the discussion if a google fiber employee can answer about how much total bandwidth is available, or what they are claiming its better than [say a 220 Mhz cable system instead of a 750, etc..] its just advertising fluff without the right info to do the math.
  10. "To create a LAN network that can handle 10Gbps is actually fairly easy, a $100 modem/router supports those speeds"

    Ummmm... no. Many consumer grade routers have 1gb ports, not 10gb, and it cannot process the data that fast. For a current setup that can handle 10gb, you're talking about building your own for about $1500, or buying one for around $15,000.
  11. Kewlx25 said:
    "To create a LAN network that can handle 10Gbps is actually fairly easy, a $100 modem/router supports those speeds"

    Ummmm... no. Many consumer grade routers have 1gb ports, not 10gb, and it cannot process the data that fast. For a current setup that can handle 10gb, you're talking about building your own for about $1500, or buying one for around $15,000.


    Definitely correct. 10GbE is pricy stuff. I'd LOVE to have 10GbE at some of the offices that I work with (including my own) but you're looking at multi-thousand dollar switches and network interface cards to make all of that operate.

    I think one thing with this thread that has gotten lost in translation is whether the OP is talking about a 1Gbps WAN connection, or 1Gbps within the LAN. There's a huge difference between the two. Gigabit within the LAN is very cheap and easy to do, 10Gbps is not. However, 1Gbps for your WAN connection is nearly impossible and even services like Google Fiber which do offer it, there has to be specialized hardware to actually be able to utilize that throughput. Most home wireless routers can't even properly route at 100 Mbps because they just don't have the processing capabilities and switching capacity.
  12. Ahh, my mistake. Got confused and thought 1Gb/10Gb instead of 100Mb/1Gb speeds on routers.
  13. In Romania 50% of subscribers use 1Gbps Internet Fiber, and 30% use speed up to 200Mbps. I personally use 1Gbps Internet for almost 5 months and the speed is amazing both externally and internally. But even so you should have a constant speed. If Google offers 1Gbps will have that just in their network speed, if you want the same speed and other networks must cumulate speed programs like 'torrent'.
    My max download speed is 114 MB / sec on ​​torrents and most of the time between 40-80 MB / sec (1Mb per second = 8Mbps)

    About 10Gbps is not for ordinary users, is used only by Internet distributors, like google servers.

    And about price here: 17$ = 1Gbps / month (including taxes and installation is free)
  14. OldBk said:
    In Romania 50% of subscribers use 1Gbps Internet Fiber, and 30% use speed up to 200Mbps. I personally use 1Gbps Internet for almost 5 months and the speed is amazing both externally and internally. But even so you should have a constant speed. If Google offers 1Gbps will have that just in their network speed, if you want the same speed and other networks must cumulate speed programs like 'torrent'.
    My max download speed is 114 MB / sec on ​​torrents and most of the time between 40-80 MB / sec (1Mb per second = 8Mbps)

    About 10Gbps is not for ordinary users, is used only by Internet distributors, like google servers.

    And about price here: 17$ = 1Gbps / month (including taxes and installation is free)


    $17!!!????!!!111?? Is that in USD? If so, im packin' my bags and heading for Romania :lol:
  15. Yes 17$, Romania is somewhere in the top 3 best internet in the world, about 80% of the country is connected with high-speed optical fiber.

    And if you subscribe to the package (Digital TV + Phone + Internet 1Gbps) the price is reduced to $ 25 for all

    Report service / price is the best, here is my ISP web: http://www.rcs-rds.ro/internet-digi-net/fiberlink?t=internet-fix&pachet=digi_net_fiberlink_1000
    And this is how u convert "Lei" to "$" https://www.google.ro/search?q=1lei+%3D+usd&oq=1lei+%3D+usd&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l3.2512j0j7&sourceid=chrome&espv=210&es_sm=122&ie=UTF-8#q=59lei+%3D+usd

    Now I saw that also provides 10Gbps but only for business, price does not show it. http://www.rcs-rds.ro/business-internet-premium?t=conect

    best internet in the world :P
  16. OldBk said:
    Yes 17$, Romania is somewhere in the top 3 best internet in the world, about 80% of the country is connected with high-speed optical fiber.

    And if you subscribe to the package (Digital TV + Phone + Internet 1Gbps) the price is reduced to $ 25 for all

    Report service / price is the best, here is my ISP web: http://www.rcs-rds.ro/internet-digi-net/fiberlink?t=internet-fix&pachet=digi_net_fiberlink_1000
    And this is how u convert "Lei" to "$" https://www.google.ro/search?q=1lei+%3D+usd&oq=1lei+%3D+usd&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l3.2512j0j7&sourceid=chrome&espv=210&es_sm=122&ie=UTF-8#q=59lei+%3D+usd

    Now I saw that also provides 10Gbps but only for business, price does not show it. http://www.rcs-rds.ro/business-internet-premium?t=conect

    best internet in the world :P


    $25 Romanian Leu is only $7.49 USD!! Thats chump change!
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