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Is this a good best-bang-for-the-buck build?

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December 12, 2013 7:43:48 AM

I want to get extreme performance in the smallest amount of money possible. Is this a good build? Is there anything I could change to significantly reduce costs without significantly reducing performance? Is there anything I am cheaping out on too much and should be investing more money in? Are any of the parts I have chosen a bad fit? (I am not worried about drive space at the moment, by the way)


PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2jaaz

Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2jaaz/by_merchant/

Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2jaaz/benchmarks/


CPU: Intel Core i5-4430 3.0GHz Quad-Core Processor ($184.98 @ SuperBiiz)

CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)

Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Pro3 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($94.99 @ Amazon)

Memory: G.Skill Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($52.99 @ Newegg)

Storage: Crucial V4 64GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($54.95 @ Amazon)

Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon R9 290 4GB Video Card ($457.98 @ SuperBiiz)

Case: Antec One ATX Mid Tower Case ($29.99 @ NCIX US)

Power Supply: CoolMax 700W 80+ Certified ATX Power Supply ($36.99 @ Newegg)

Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)

Total: $957.84

(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-12-12 10:29 EST-0500)



Thanks in advance!

More about : good bang buck build

December 12, 2013 7:48:29 AM

I would say that you should invest more on the psu, cheaping on the psu isn't a smart move, also the r9 290 is pretty loud and also it gets really hot, i would suggest the 280x and invest some more money on the case and the psu wich you probably will have for some time, the gpu in 2-3 years ur probably gonna change it anyway, my opinions is only from my point of view i'm not an expert tough
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December 12, 2013 7:50:34 AM

Thats a good config. But AMD fx 6300 + HD7870 is a better bang for a buck build
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December 12, 2013 7:52:52 AM



CoolMax is not a reliable power supply company, replace it with a 550-650W PSU from Antec, XFX, Corsair, or Sea Sonic

64 GB is too small for your only hard drive: replace with a 128 for boot, and a 1tb for storage
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December 12, 2013 7:53:18 AM

In a word - No

You made a good choice on the cheapest i5, it's always going to give you great value.

If you aren't overclocking, the CPU cooler is a total waste of money. An extra $30 in graphics or CPU is going to make a bigger boost. Or you could just pocket $30

The motherboard is a cheap(ish) Z87 board. These don't have much of a purpose, as Z87 is primarily for overclocking and multi-gpu setups, and you wouldn't want to overclock on a cheaper board.
Drop to a B85 or H87 (or even H81 if you really want to max the value) motherboard and you'll save a big pile of cash.

Personally, I think a 64Gb SSD is a bit pointless given how cheap SSDs are. I have a 64Gb SSD and after a year it is really hard to keep it because of the way Windows increases it's file size. A 120/128 is a much better investment at the current prices. Or, if you want max value, ditch it altogether.

Antec One is a nice case for the price, but it's maybe a little too cheap (it also can't fit the CPU cooler you don't need). If you want something similar but a bit nicer, the Antec Three Hundred Two is probably a bit more appropriate. The One is a good pick for a budget build though.

The PSU is a doorstop. Toss it out straight away and go for something decent. This really isn't a place to cut corners. The Antec HCG-620M is a quality modular option which has a lot of deals on it recently. There's a lot of good choices though, XFX Core range, Seasonic M12 II, Rosewill Capstone and even the Corsair CX range are a lot better than the CoolMax.
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December 12, 2013 7:54:48 AM

ghost878 said:
Thats a good config. But AMD fx 6300 + HD7870 is a better bang for a buck build


How could you possibly compare a R9 290 with the 7870? :/ 

The build is fine, but as stated above I'd use a R9 280X and buy a better PSU and maybe invest in a HDD (in case you don't have one)
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December 12, 2013 8:03:08 AM

Metalrenok said:


How could you possibly compare a R9 290 with the 7870? :/ 

The build is fine, but as stated above I'd use a R9 280X and buy a better PSU and maybe invest in a HDD (in case you don't have one)


R9 290 is way superior. its just that 7870 is a budget beast.
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December 12, 2013 6:56:17 PM

Thank you all, I have taken your suggestions into consideration, as well as the suggestions from members of another forum board. I have put another build together based on the suggestions I have gotten. I have not decided which graphics card I will go with yet, but is everything good besides that? Note that I will not be overclocking my PC.

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2jt4z
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2jt4z/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2jt4z/benchmarks/
CPU: Intel Core i5-4430 3.0GHz Quad-Core Processor ($184.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: MSI H81M-P33 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($52.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 250GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($35.44 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon R9 290 4GB Video Card ($457.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Antec One ATX Mid Tower Case ($29.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Cooler Master i600 600W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($39.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)

Total: $866.35
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-12-12 21:49 EST-0500)
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December 12, 2013 7:14:15 PM

PSU still isn't very good, see the comments above.

The HDD you are better off swapping for a 1TB Caviar Blue. It's a bit more expensive, but it's absolutely money well spent ($25 for quadruple the capacity and a vastly increased cache).

Normally, I'd say the i5 4430 and an H81 are the best value components you can get really, as they are as cheap as you can make them without denting performance. Newegg and Superbiiz however, have combo deals on the 4570+a variety of motherboards. This can mean anything from $5-15 off the prices, giving you a 4570 for the price of a 4430.
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