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Looking to build a custom gaming PC, budget ~$1200-1400

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December 12, 2013 2:52:12 PM

I'm looking at getting a good custom PC soon, but I have never built a PC before. I'd like some advice on what build I should go with.

Some of my preferences:
-Decent sized SSD Drive, at least 100 GB probably
-Good CPU and GPU Capable of running games at high fps.
-Maybe overclock capabilities, I've never done this but might in the future.
-Preferably Intel, but if there's an AMD CPU that can increase performance for the same Price it's fine
-Good cooling system
-Other basic parts like Optical drives, sound cards, wireless cards. These don't seem as important to me but I have no idea what I should be getting.

This PC will be the first quality PC I own, and I'll probably get it in a month or two. I'll probably be keeping this PC for at least 5 years. Also, I'm looking at getting the parts on NCIX and using price match feature to keep the price down, and just pay them $50 to assemble it.

Any other advice would be appreciated. Thank you.
a b 4 Gaming
December 12, 2013 3:00:24 PM

Do you need operating system and/or peripherials such as keyboard, mouse and monitor ?

Also Canada or US ?
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Best solution

a b 4 Gaming
December 12, 2013 3:07:15 PM

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2jm9h
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2jm9h/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2jm9h/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($239.99 @ NCIX US)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Asus Z87-A ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($149.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($102.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($109.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($349.99 @ NCIX US)
Wireless Network Adapter: Asus USB-N53 802.11a/b/g/n USB 2.0 Wi-Fi Adapter ($27.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 400R ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA NEX750B BRONZE 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($22.15 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1323.05
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-12-12 18:07 EST-0500)
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December 12, 2013 3:10:40 PM

rvilkman said:
Do you need operating system and/or peripherials such as keyboard, mouse and monitor ?

Also Canada or US ?


In US, I plan to purchase keyboard mouse an monitor separately, I will need an operating system though
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December 12, 2013 3:14:46 PM

smorizio said:
PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2jm9h
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2jm9h/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2jm9h/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($239.99 @ NCIX US)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Asus Z87-A ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($149.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($102.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($109.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($349.99 @ NCIX US)
Wireless Network Adapter: Asus USB-N53 802.11a/b/g/n USB 2.0 Wi-Fi Adapter ($27.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 400R ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA NEX750B BRONZE 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($22.15 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1323.05
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-12-12 18:07 EST-0500)


About the CPU, would adding $50 to get qn i7-4770 be worth it over the i5 4670?
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a b 4 Gaming
December 12, 2013 3:21:54 PM

if your doing video editing it would. most newer games dont use hyper threading yet. I would use the 50 for a better gpu or power supply or case.
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a c 276 4 Gaming
December 12, 2013 3:30:03 PM

DoSTrojan said:
About the CPU, would adding $50 to get qn i7-4770 be worth it over the i5 4670?


No not for gaming.

Here's a build I would suggest with a GTX 780:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.98 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($33.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($57.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vector 150 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($134.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($86.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($509.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: NZXT Phantom 410 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($90.43 @ TigerDirect)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling Silencer Mk III 750W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($149.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1302.33
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-12-12 16:57 EST-0500)
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a b 4 Gaming
December 12, 2013 3:31:05 PM

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2jmRs
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2jmRs/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2jmRs/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($239.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87X-UD3H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-2400 Memory ($127.50 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($159.99 @ Adorama)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($86.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: Asus Radeon R9 280X 3GB Video Card ($319.99 @ B&H)
Case: Corsair 300R ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Microcenter)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($114.99 @ NCIX US)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - OEM (64-bit) ($94.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1349.39
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-12-12 18:30 EST-0500)

Not sure how this all works with NCIX, but It has the OS, good graphics. You can opt for a GTX770 if you feel like it, should be space still. 850W psu allows to SLI/Crossfire if needed.

Whoops missed optical drive, well that is ~$20 more.
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December 12, 2013 3:37:35 PM

g-unit1111 said:
DoSTrojan said:
About the CPU, would adding $50 to get qn i7-4770 be worth it over the i5 4670?


No not for gaming.

Here's a build I would suggest with a GTX 780:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.98 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($33.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($57.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vector 150 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($134.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($86.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($509.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: NZXT Phantom 410 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($90.43 @ TigerDirect)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling Silencer Mk III 750W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($149.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1302.33
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-12-12 16:57 EST-0500)


Motherboard?
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December 12, 2013 3:45:37 PM

What exactly is the advantage of a more expensive power supply?
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a b 4 Gaming
December 12, 2013 3:53:30 PM

Usually quality and efficiency.

Also generally the wattage.
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a b 4 Gaming
December 12, 2013 3:56:16 PM

if it a higher wattage then you can sli or crossfire it. cosair and sesonic have the lowest doa rate and when you buy the higher end units the silver and gold the parts used are higher qality then the bronze units so having a doa is less and having it run for years gets better. but if you look at two units from the same company one bronzs and one gold they may use the same parts almost just one has better energy savings at set loads. but paying 50 or more for better power savings could be a waste in a fixed build.
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December 12, 2013 4:23:04 PM

Alright, thanks everyone, now I have a place to get started. I'll probably post a final build here for review in a couple weeks when I buy a pc.
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!