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Christmas Budget Gaming Build (First Timer) < $600

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December 13, 2013 11:20:34 AM

Here is the current PC component list I have put together based off my prior research:

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2jKd0
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2jKd0/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2jKd0/benchmarks/

CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($109.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus M5A97 LE R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($83.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Kingston HyperX Blu 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($69.29 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($58.80 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Asus Radeon HD 7790 1GB Video Card ($109.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Xigmatek ASGARD PRO (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($45.07 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Raidmax 500W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($39.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24F1ST DVD/CD Writer
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 (OEM) (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Keyboard: Logitech K120 Wired Standard Keyboard ($10.77 @ Amazon)
Total: $627.88
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-12-13 14:11 EST-0500)

I am new to PC gaming, and building a PC in general. I am looking for any recommendations based off this list, that would help drive the price down while keeping the performance the same (if not better).

Also, I am pretty sure I took the precaution to make sure the components are compatible with each other; however, a second pair of experienced eyes would be appreciated to double check this.

**And if you have noticed within my PCPartPicker list, I am only trying to buy PC components from off of Amazon using Amazon Prime service for the free 2 day shipping, as I want to get a hold of these parts in time for Christmas.

Along with the core components, I also need to get another copy of Windows 8 OS and a cheap, reliable keyboard (doesn't have to be mechanical). Also, I threw in the DVD drive because I still would have a use for them and they aren't too expensive. With this said, I am trying to keep the final cost (preferably) under, if not close, to $600.

All help and considerations are greatly appreciated! Thanks
a b 4 Gaming
December 13, 2013 11:41:55 AM

It is all compatible and looks good

This Antec ONE case is a good alternative and saves you some money
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/antec-case-one

That would allow you to get the ASUS M5A97 R2.0 mb which has better power circuitry , better heatsinks and should allow overclocking as an option.
Another alternative for a budget would be the Asrock 970 extreme3 .
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December 13, 2013 11:48:17 AM

i second to get the m5a97 r2.0 board.
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December 13, 2013 11:58:36 AM

Outlander_04 said:
It is all compatible and looks good

This Antec ONE case is a good alternative and saves you some money
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/antec-case-one

That would allow you to get the ASUS M5A97 R2.0 mb which has better power circuitry , better heatsinks and should allow overclocking as an option.
Another alternative for a budget would be the Asrock 970 extreme3 .


Thanks for the response Outlander_04!

Since I am new to building PC builds and PC gaming in general, I am not so certain I will be looking to overclock anything right out of the box. I am just not familiar with this and don't want to accidentally damage my system. Rather, if I do look on expanding my performance, I would probably rely on upgrading my GPU/CPU to handle more demanding games in the future.

Question: Is there any chance I could get a better GPU and overall gaming performance by making any changes to the setup (yet still keep the price point close to/under the $600 goal)? And are all my current components good and reliable options, or should I look to replace one (or more) of my components for others?

Once again, many thanks for the input!
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December 13, 2013 11:59:52 AM

Not that I am questioning your judgement, by why is this MOBO much more superior to my current selection? Is it worth the extra cash now or in the future?

Once again, not questioning but I just want to get more insight on why this is.

Thanks!
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a b 4 Gaming
December 13, 2013 12:08:55 PM

Overclocking with AMD is very easy . Their software drivers you have to instal allow you to automatically overclock in steps and the system automatically limits you to what is safe for your set up . Two mouse clicks , one the program is open .

The LE board has fewer power phases . That in itself wont affect overclocking potential but more power phases will run cooler if you do so its the preferred option . The LE board lacks internal headers to connect front USB 3 ports on the case . And it is narrower than a standard ATX board meaning there is less room anound the processor and RAM so conflicts with a cpu cooler would be more likely .
For budget buying go for the Asrock 970 extreme 3 rather than theASUS LE .
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