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Intel CPU 54C Idle Temp - Problem?

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December 16, 2013 6:32:15 PM

Hello everyone. I am turning to some forums for help with a concern I have with my fairly new laptop.

So, I bought a new Sager NP7330 Laptop a few months ago. I noticed it getting hot at the bottom of the screen, and finally decided to check up on my internal temps with a program.

I used speedfan, and coretemp, both of them gave me pretty much the same readings.

My CPU (Intel i7 4700MQ) is idling at about 54C. I'm pretty sure that's a problem, but I thought I'd get some advice, because I'm really no pro with computers.

I have already checked, and reapplied thermal paste. I noticed a very slight drop in temp after cleaning off the factory paste, and putting on some Arctic Silver 5. It went down from about 58C idling, to the above 54C.

Would anyone care to give me some advice. Is this warranty worthy with Sager? Can I fix it myself?

For reference, I run my laptop fans at 100% all the time, and I keep a full sized cooler under my laptop as well. Room temp is probably 69F.

Thanks in advance!

EDIT: Wow, this thing really is HOT. Just being on the internet and typing this gets me around 70C on core 0, and 61C and the other three.
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December 16, 2013 6:39:19 PM

Haswell runs hot because intel opted for a cheap thermal paste with ivy instead of the tried and true solder approach. People who have the balls to take the heatspreader off and apply good quality paste reports a drop in temps of up to 20c. I wouldn't do that in a million years, but it just shows how much intel dropped the ball with ivy and now haswell.

At least your batteries won't run dry anytime soon.
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December 16, 2013 8:46:40 PM

bouncedk said:
Haswell runs hot because intel opted for a cheap thermal paste with ivy instead of the tried and true solder approach. People who have the balls to take the heatspreader off and apply good quality paste reports a drop in temps of up to 20c. I wouldn't do that in a million years, but it just shows how much intel dropped the ball with ivy and now haswell.

At least your batteries won't run dry anytime soon.


Unfortunately it's true. My friend was running a 3770k at stock speeds with a H100i and his temps were around 45 C at idle. He had the balls to take off the heat spread and ended breaking a $350 CPU. He decided to screw Ivy Bridge and Haswell and go with a 2600k. He's sitting at 5.4GHz with his 2600k with idle temps of around 28-32 C. I would never buy a new Intel based off of this story, I would only buy a 2700k. Sticking with AMD until Intel gets its head out of its *** and uses the tested solder method. That may not be ever, unfortunately.
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December 17, 2013 7:16:36 AM

navyboy887 said:
bouncedk said:
Haswell runs hot because intel opted for a cheap thermal paste with ivy instead of the tried and true solder approach. People who have the balls to take the heatspreader off and apply good quality paste reports a drop in temps of up to 20c. I wouldn't do that in a million years, but it just shows how much intel dropped the ball with ivy and now haswell.

At least your batteries won't run dry anytime soon.


Unfortunately it's true. My friend was running a 3770k at stock speeds with a H100i and his temps were around 45 C at idle. He had the balls to take off the heat spread and ended breaking a $350 CPU. He decided to screw Ivy Bridge and Haswell and go with a 2600k. He's sitting at 5.4GHz with his 2600k with idle temps of around 28-32 C. I would never buy a new Intel based off of this story, I would only buy a 2700k. Sticking with AMD until Intel gets its head out of its *** and uses the tested solder method. That may not be ever, unfortunately.


Wow, well that is rather unfortunate. :| But thank you both for the prompt replies.

Is this something that a computer shop could possibly do - solder the CPU properly?

What's a good laptop CPU equivalent or better to a 4th gen Intel i7 4700MQ? I may just have to shell out some money for something better...

One last question for you experts: Will these high tempuratures put my computer at risk, or do they just hurt the CPU? If the CPU is really that bad, then I don't care if it burns itself out. I'll just buy a new one when the time comes. But if the hot CPU will mess up the rest of my computer up, then I'm concerned.

Thanks!
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December 18, 2013 7:12:35 PM

I took off the heatspeader off my i5 4670k. Cut my left index finger while doing it too. Not bad but it was worth it. No damage to the CPU whatsoever. I didn't do it to increase my max overclocking potential but to drop temps for longevity. Heat in the long term is the #1 killer of CPUs, the more voltage you run through them the more heat is created just like a wire. If you don't want to take the heatspreader off, then why don't you try using less power (undervolting your CPU). When processor makers manufacturer a Haswell chip, they test them so they set the power requirements for that CPU. In a lot of cases, default or stock voltage is more than what is required to keep it running. If you would like to see a video on how to do this, here is the link. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mBEeXajbG2o

This is from the last generation o but the same rules will apply. It's been the same for a very long time. I know this video is an overclocking guide but he will show you how to undervolt your CPU and drop your temperatures.
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December 19, 2013 8:10:11 AM

metalgun2000 said:
I took off the heatspeader off my i5 4670k. Cut my left index finger while doing it too. Not bad but it was worth it. No damage to the CPU whatsoever. I didn't do it to increase my max overclocking potential but to drop temps for longevity. Heat in the long term is the #1 killer of CPUs, the more voltage you run through them the more heat is created just like a wire. If you don't want to take the heatspreader off, then why don't you try using less power (undervolting your CPU). When processor makers manufacturer a Haswell chip, they test them so they set the power requirements for that CPU. In a lot of cases, default or stock voltage is more than what is required to keep it running. If you would like to see a video on how to do this, here is the link. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mBEeXajbG2o

This is from the last generation o but the same rules will apply. It's been the same for a very long time. I know this video is an overclocking guide but he will show you how to undervolt your CPU and drop your temperatures.


Thanks for the help. Out of curiosity, how much of a drop did you notice after removing the heatspreader and fixing the issue?

I'm tempted to try that myself, but I'm wondering if it's worth it.

I will check out that video, and see if I can't successfully undervolt my CPU a little bit.

Thanks!
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December 19, 2013 2:56:26 PM

My temps dropped by about 20 C across the board, idle and full load. I'm not using a high end thermal paste either. I have MX-4 on the CPU die and the heatspreader. It's non-conductive like the metallic based pastes so if you get a little on a contact or something there's no danger of a short circuit and relatively inexpensive.
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December 19, 2013 3:54:18 PM

DeathAndPain said:
I am using Prolimatech PK-1. It is not conductive either, yet one of the best thermal greases on the market.


I really do have to get around to trying that PK-1. I still have that massive 20 gram tube of MX-4 and I haven't used a fraction yet. MX-4 is good but it's a little thick. I've been wanting to try Liquid Pro too but that's more a semi-permanent TIM. My OCD won't allow my to leave TIM on for more than 6 months. I always find a reason to fiddle with my hardware.
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December 19, 2013 5:40:26 PM

I have a 4670K and I use the stock cooler and still get only 28-34 C temps on idle!
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a c 159 à CPUs
December 20, 2013 8:46:45 AM

DeathAndPain said:
You compare desktop with notebook, which is inadequate. In notebooks, things are much more cramped, so cooling is much more of an issue, even though notebook processors typically consume less power than their desktop counterparts.


No not really. Desktop temps are pretty awful as well.
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