Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

SSHD vs HDD+SSD

Last response: in Storage
Share
December 18, 2013 6:57:45 PM

The time has come to upgrade my 5 year old 500GB 5400RPM Caviar Black hard drive. It's making all sorts of funky sounds and has really started to slow down my whole PC. So my question is, should I get the Seagate 1TB desktop SSHD or a Seagate Barracuda 1TB HDD and a 120GB SSD? The HDD+SSD would be about $40 more than the SSHD. I would put about 60GB of games, the OS, and small but frequently used programs on the SSD. Is it worth the extra $40?

More about : sshd hdd ssd

December 18, 2013 7:00:59 PM

If it matters...
i5 3570k
Asrock Z77 Extreme4
4GB 1333 Ram (soon to be 8GB 1600)
EVGA GTX770
EVGA 600B PSU
m
0
l
a c 152 G Storage
December 18, 2013 7:02:17 PM

Since having an SSD + HDD gives you FULL control over what gets the extra speed, I would go that route.

After all it would suck to see the SSHDD want to place your favorite music album into its limited space(ssd portion).

If you go the SSD + HDD router you can also change the location of all your "user" folders like documents/desktop/ect to the hard drive since these things do not need the speed.

You can also use Intels caching if you wanted the SSD + HDD to act like a sshdd with more ssd(but when I last check it, it maxed out at 64 gigabytes.), but again. being in full control of the ssd seems like the best bet to me.
m
0
l
Related resources
December 18, 2013 8:24:01 PM

I'll probably go the HDD+SSD route then. Since I am new to multiple drives, what would I have to do so that I have folders like programfiles(x86) and users on both the SSD and HDD?
m
0
l

Best solution

a c 152 G Storage
December 18, 2013 9:53:35 PM

First thing

Install Windows with only the SSD installed. This is to avoid Windows placing a boot loader on the hard drive.

As for programs, most programs allow you to chose an install location. I think you will be placing most stuff on the ssd :) 

As for keeping 64 bit and 32 bit separated, you do not have to when you custom install them on the other drive. You can if you wish, but I have not seen a need to. Windows keeps them separate to avoid issues(and since some programs have a 32 bit and 64 bit version).

Steam allows you to make a game library on the hard drive to allow you to install games that are too big or do not get a boost from the ssd on the hard drive without any fancy tricks. You will see this option every time you install a game on steam now.

If you have a program that is stubborn you can use this method. do NOT use this method to try to move parts of Windows as it can cause issues.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/294557-32-guide-move-...

As for all your user folders, you can just goto c : \ your name \ and right click folders like desktop ect and choose a new location.'

So you may have a setup like this

c : windows and games
d : with some folders like Games, Programs, and Your name(or login. just do not do like me. my documents folder is actually a hard drive. this has worked for me, but If i was to start over, I would have used a folder with subfolders for desktop/documents/ect)

An alternative way to move ALL user folders and appdata over to the hard drive would be this. I have not used this method but other forum users have. Since I have had multi drive setups since before this method was common I just never moved over to this idea as it will not work for me personally(Some of my systems now have the users folders in a network location[makes backup much more easy since all my personal files are in one central location] and not local. I plan to have this for all my future systems).

If you have any other questions, just ask.
Share
December 19, 2013 5:38:39 AM

Thanks for the help man
m
0
l
!