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Laptop temperature while idle and gaming ? Whats normal ? What are the limits ?

Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
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December 20, 2013 9:09:05 AM

Hi.
I got my hands on a laptop and just as a precaution I figured I might as well find out what are the safe temps for it.

specs:
17,5" Acer V3-772G (1080p)
Intel I5-4200M
Nvidia 750M
750GB HDD+500GB HDD+125GB SSD


Temperature so far:
CPU; surfing/movies: 40-48¤C ; gaming: 63-67¤C with a few spikes at 70¤C
GPU; temperature is usually 10-15¤C lower than CPU

At what temperature will heat damage my laptop ?
Also, at what temperature should I get worried about cleaning/getting a laptop cooler ?

Thanks in advance

Best solution

a b 4 Gaming
December 20, 2013 9:13:31 AM

laptop components are generally designed to tolerate fairly high temperatures. typically anything under 80-85 C is perfectly fine and within normal range. so your temperatures are actually excellent and well under the safety cap.
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December 20, 2013 9:33:48 AM

Anything new has thermal protection mechanisms built in. Your laptop will not melt regardless of what you do with it... but it will slow the CPU/GPU down once the thermal limits have been exceeded (usually in the range of 90-110C).

If you are worried about temps, simply prop the back of the laptop up with a book (or anything) to improve airflow. I wouldn't worry about a cooler unless you want to spend a lot of time with a 17" laptop on your lap/bed/couch (basically any non hard surface that will block the air vents)
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Anonymous
December 21, 2013 11:06:08 AM

High heat is tolerated well by laptops, but it will marginally decrease the life of your components from thermal cycling. If you're really worried, every once in a while take off the heat sinks and apply new thermal paste.
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a c 201 D Laptop
December 22, 2013 4:55:47 PM

Anonymous said:
High heat is tolerated well by laptops, but it will marginally decrease the life of your components from thermal cycling. If you're really worried, every once in a while take off the heat sinks and apply new thermal paste.


Hi, if you have a personal belief that "High heat is tolerated well by laptops, but it will marginally decrease the life of your components from thermal cycling" is true, you must provide some facts from your belief. I'm working in the field of repairing printed circuit boards, I disagree with your assumption.
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Anonymous
December 22, 2013 11:04:51 PM

jarotech said:
Anonymous said:
High heat is tolerated well by laptops, but it will marginally decrease the life of your components from thermal cycling. If you're really worried, every once in a while take off the heat sinks and apply new thermal paste.


Hi, if you have a personal belief that "High heat is tolerated well by laptops, but it will marginally decrease the life of your components from thermal cycling" is true, you must provide some facts from your belief. I'm working in the field of repairing printed circuit boards, I disagree with your assumption.


Thermal cycling of varying dT have been tested in hundreds of studies. All have found a higher dT is inversely proportional to the time to fail.

Intel I7 processors for desktop allow temp of up to 75 deg C. Intel I7 processors for laptop allow temps up to 100 deg C.

Neither of these are opinions, nor are they controversial.
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