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Please help! New custom built PC shutdown. and won't start up!

Last response: in Components
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December 20, 2013 3:34:48 PM

After I installed windows 7 on my pc and got my antivirus programs up and running,... I went to go check out game performance. So i downloaded Planet side 2 and played it with almost everything maxed out. After 20 minutes of playing this game,... My PC shutdown and won't start back up. I had the pc professionaly wired and put together.
When trying to turn it on, The LED lights turn on and the fan on the heatsink for the cpu runs when i try to turn it on. But nothings apearing on my screen. Its not even loading up to the bios screen. I switched gpus and that didnt help. Oh and when i try to turn it off after turning it on, it wont turn off, i held down on the power button and the pc wouldnt turn it off. To turn it off I would need to flip the switch that has an (I O) thing on it. Idk what it could be, the Led lights on the Mobo light up when i press the on button. But the pc still isnt running.
Is it possible my psu is bad? It's an atx 480 psu that came with my case.
Specs: FX 4130 cpu
gpu. HD 7770 factorty overclocked
atx 480 watt psu
6 gigs of ram 1600 mghz (one stick is a 1333 mhz 2 gigs i scrapped from my old pc.
Note* I had no case fan installed, But it was only 20 minutes of gameplay. and my case has 2 huge vents on the side of the case, so i believe the hot air had a way out. .
Any suggestions?
December 20, 2013 3:38:49 PM

If it worked for 20 minutes then stopped, it really sounds like something overheated. IF you have another power supply available, try installing it in your system, but with it physically turning on, I would think the problem lies with the mobo or cpu. Do you have a way to check the cpu on another motherboard, or another cpu on the motherboard you have ?
OR, even better, since you had it professionally assembled, I would take it to them and have them take a look at it.
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December 20, 2013 3:58:30 PM

1. a PSU 'included' with a case is often junk.
2. Professionally assembled, with no case fans?

If local, take it back to who put it together. It does sound like a heat issue.
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December 20, 2013 4:00:50 PM

jeremyp79 said:
If it worked for 20 minutes then stopped, it really sounds like something overheated. IF you have another power supply available, try installing it in your system, but with it physically turning on, I would think the problem lies with the mobo or cpu. Do you have a way to check the cpu on another motherboard, or another cpu on the motherboard you have ?
OR, even better, since you had it professionally assembled, I would take it to them and have them take a look at it.



I would take it to them but, they charge 30$ just to look at it and another 30$ to do anything about it(i'm broke). I'm planning on having a friend setup a different psu to see if that will work but, to be honest... It doesn't make much sense to me how it could be the psu since the power is getting all the way to the fan on my cpu's heatsing. I looked at my cpu and behind it and it doesn't look burnt or anything. And the pins on it still look perfectly alligned and shiny as when i first bought it. I'm not saying its not the psu, I just dont know that much.
I'm thinking its either that Mobo, Cpu or psu. There is nothing else that i see that can affect this.
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Best solution

December 20, 2013 4:02:26 PM

Here's a "silly" question, but when you looked at the cpu, I'm assuming it means you took the heatsink off. Was there any thermal paste on the cpu?
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December 20, 2013 4:04:38 PM

No 'evidence' of burnt bits does not equal nothing wrong. It could be one of a number of things.

And a shop that won't stand behind their assembly is just wrong.
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December 20, 2013 4:19:28 PM

jeremyp79 said:
Here's a "silly" question, but when you looked at the cpu, I'm assuming it means you took the heatsink off. Was there any thermal paste on the cpu?


yes, it had the stock thermal paste on it, but its all dry now.
I accidentaly chose this as a solution, but its not solved. I ment to hit reply... how do i unmark this
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December 20, 2013 4:24:48 PM

muntaser13 said:
jeremyp79 said:
Here's a "silly" question, but when you looked at the cpu, I'm assuming it means you took the heatsink off. Was there any thermal paste on the cpu?


yes, it had the stock thermal paste on it, but its all dry now.
I accidentaly chose this as a solution, but its not solved. I ment to hit reply... how do i unmark this


Are you sure you want that one undone?
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December 20, 2013 4:34:32 PM

Did the thermal paste completely cover the top of the cpu, or was it clean on one corner/side?
And DO NOT try to start the computer without putting fresh thermal paste on the cpu/HS. That will definitely overheat, very quickly.
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December 20, 2013 4:43:25 PM

jeremyp79 said:
Did the thermal paste completely cover the top of the cpu, or was it clean on one corner/side?
And DO NOT try to start the computer without putting fresh thermal paste on the cpu/HS. That will definitely overheat, very quickly.

I wouldn't say completely covered, when i removed the heatsink, most of the paste was still on the heatsink. the cpu had a little residue of it on.
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December 20, 2013 4:50:55 PM

Kind of sounds like the heatsink wasnt installed properly. If it's all the way down, the thermal paste should completely cover the entire cpu, and since you took it off, you probably lost your chance of the shop you used taking responsibility for messing it up. Clean the cpu and heatsink, with rubbing alcohol(at least 70%, but 90% would be better), and follow this guide; http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/333968-28-thermal-pas... to apply new thermal paste. Make sure your heatsink fan is plugged into the cpu fan header, and try to boot your system.
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December 20, 2013 5:08:52 PM

It's not completely essential that the thermal paste completely cover the CPU, however, the clamping force must be substantial for any heatsink fan to work properly. muntaser13, did your "professional wiring" person also assemble the rest of the computer?

The problem you're experiencing is either with the motherboard or the CPU in my opinion. It is highly unlikely that the motherboard and fans would turn on at all if the power supply had kicked the bucket.

I actually think the most likely problem here is that the motherboard has gone bad for one reason or another. The OP said that they played the game at full blast for 20 minutes. If the CPU were overheating, they would immediately see a huge amount of stutter and problems with game performance as the CPU hit its thermal clock speed throttling temperature, which would prompt an investigation into the source of the problem. The fact that it just clicked off and died indicates to me that something in a power section somewhere popped. It could easily have been a voltage regulator on the motherboard itself. If the motherboard is cheap and OP was operating (especially with an overclock) WITHOUT a case fan as suggested, that could cause temps to rise and a voltage regulator to fail on the mobo and send it into some kind of protection state. Hopefully this is the case and the OP has not killed the CPU as a result of an internal short from something melting down. This is all speculation, of course, but if it were my money, I'd get a fresh CPU and motherboard into the case and try firing it up (with the side panels removed, of course).
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December 20, 2013 5:26:21 PM

I just switched my amd fx 4130 cpu with my sempron 145(am3 ) into my am3+ socket motherboard and it still didnt work. So i dont think its the cpu
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December 20, 2013 7:34:35 PM

I would say your best option at this point is to call up the motherboard manufacturer. Their technical support staff will guide you through a series of troubleshooting steps before issuing an RMA. Make sure you tell them what happened and that you did indeed try another CPU. They will likely issue an RMA.

By the way, you may quickly test the primary PSU rails (+5V and +12V) by backprobing the 4-pin molex connectors (red and yellow wires respectively) relative to ground (chassis, or one of the black wires) using a multimeter, while the computer is switched on (of course, in your case the CPU fan will be spinning and nothing else will be happening, that is OK, as long as it is switched on). Even a cheap analog one set to DC Volts will get the job done. You can also backprobe the big 24-pin ATX connector and ensure continuity there on all wires. I found an excellent image using google image search (not mine) for your reference:

http://i930.photobucket.com/albums/ad146/ocztech/ATX24-...
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