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Hackintosh Recommendations and Compatibility

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December 25, 2013 2:25:09 PM

Hey guys,
So I'm looking to build a Hackintosh for around $2k. I've built multiple computers before so the hardware itself is no problem, but I've never done a Hackintosh build. My main concern is compatibility. I'd like to do it with a 3930k (as video editing is a priority), and also a relatively good graphics card (photo editing, sometimes gaming). I've read compatibility lists, and it seems like nothing is too troublesome. However, on one of the main websites, it says that the "power management" functions are unavailable with a 2011-socket CPU. If this is the case, then there is no way that that is a viable option, as the build must work well.
Also, I'm unsure of reliability; will there be problems with new OS updates every month, or will it be fine for years?
Mostly, if anyone has recommendations of parts for a Hackintosh build, I'd be glad to hear 'em. Also, if anyone has experience with 2011 specifically that would be great.
Also, the question of reliability.
Thanks in advance!

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December 27, 2013 10:52:11 AM

dannyboy2233 said:
So I'm looking to build a Hackintosh for around $2k. I've built multiple computers before so the hardware itself is no problem, but I've never done a Hackintosh build. My main concern is compatibility. I'd like to do it with a 3930k (as video editing is a priority), and also a relatively good graphics card (photo editing, sometimes gaming). I've read compatibility lists, and it seems like nothing is too troublesome. However, on one of the main websites, it says that the "power management" functions are unavailable with a 2011-socket CPU. If this is the case, then there is no way that that is a viable option, as the build must work well.

"power management" functions means you won't get Speedstep and other cpu power feature. Sleep might be problematic too, etc. You can however set the multiplier manually, and overclock if you like. The cpu's multiplier won't adjust for load so you can save power or have turbo kick in, thats all. It will work fine.

dannyboy2233 said:
Also, I'm unsure of reliability; will there be problems with new OS updates every month, or will it be fine for years?
Mostly, if anyone has recommendations of parts for a Hackintosh build, I'd be glad to hear 'em. Also, if anyone has experience with 2011 specifically that would be great.
Also, the question of reliability.

Updates are always potentially tricky. Minors updates within the same OS version are usually not too difficult to apply, but major updates can be an adventure, especially if you're new to this. Always backup your stuff before proceding. Honestly, I don't update much my rigs once everything is working like I want, but when I did update, it went fine.

The most easy hackintosh I've built for the kind of work you want to do is probably with a board like the GA-Z87X-UD5H. I have the GA-Z77X-UD5H, which is pretty much the same install from what I read, and it was a breeze to set up. It won't have the brute force of a Socket 2011 (which I also have), but it should be fine for most task if paired with a capable cpu.

For easy install process, I'd stick with NVidia, but AMD works too.

At the end, building and maintening a hackintosh requires a bit of trial and error and a good amount of searching. It is definitely easier to do now than ever, especially with ressources like Tonymacx86, which you already know about, but it isn't guarantee to be plug and play, you have to be aware of that.

You already know your way around computer hardware which is a good thing though. You just need to get your head around the basics of hackintosh and tools, things get smoother from there.

Have fun!
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December 27, 2013 2:32:26 PM

kbits said:
dannyboy2233 said:
So I'm looking to build a Hackintosh for around $2k. I've built multiple computers before so the hardware itself is no problem, but I've never done a Hackintosh build. My main concern is compatibility. I'd like to do it with a 3930k (as video editing is a priority), and also a relatively good graphics card (photo editing, sometimes gaming). I've read compatibility lists, and it seems like nothing is too troublesome. However, on one of the main websites, it says that the "power management" functions are unavailable with a 2011-socket CPU. If this is the case, then there is no way that that is a viable option, as the build must work well.

"power management" functions means you won't get Speedstep and other cpu power feature. Sleep might be problematic too, etc. You can however set the multiplier manually, and overclock if you like. The cpu's multiplier won't adjust for load so you can save power or have turbo kick in, thats all. It will work fine.

dannyboy2233 said:
Also, I'm unsure of reliability; will there be problems with new OS updates every month, or will it be fine for years?
Mostly, if anyone has recommendations of parts for a Hackintosh build, I'd be glad to hear 'em. Also, if anyone has experience with 2011 specifically that would be great.
Also, the question of reliability.

Updates are always potentially tricky. Minors updates within the same OS version are usually not too difficult to apply, but major updates can be an adventure, especially if you're new to this. Always backup your stuff before proceding. Honestly, I don't update much my rigs once everything is working like I want, but when I did update, it went fine.

The most easy hackintosh I've built for the kind of work you want to do is probably with a board like the GA-Z87X-UD5H. I have the GA-Z77X-UD5H, which is pretty much the same install from what I read, and it was a breeze to set up. It won't have the brute force of a Socket 2011 (which I also have), but it should be fine for most task if paired with a capable cpu.

For easy install process, I'd stick with NVidia, but AMD works too.

At the end, building and maintening a hackintosh requires a bit of trial and error and a good amount of searching. It is definitely easier to do now than ever, especially with ressources like Tonymacx86, which you already know about, but it isn't guarantee to be plug and play, you have to be aware of that.

You already know your way around computer hardware which is a good thing though. You just need to get your head around the basics of hackintosh and tools, things get smoother from there.

Have fun!


Awesome, thanks for your help!
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