Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Question about the 780 ti Superclocked GPU

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
Share
December 25, 2013 3:14:49 PM

Hello i plan on buying a GeForce GTX 780 Ti Superclocked 3GB But there is the "GeForce GTX 780 Ti Superclocked 3GB w/ ACX Cooler" for only 20$ i get the ACX cooler on the GTX 780ti

Is the extra 20$ ACX Cooler Worth the extra 20$?

780 TI Superclocked: http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX49193

780 TI Superclocked w/ ACX Cooler: http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX49450

Should i buy the 780 ti superclocked 3gb with ACX cooler for 20$ more or get the 780 ti Superclocked 3GB without the ACX cooler is it worth it?

Also what if it wasn't on sale would it not be worth buying the ACX Cooler on the 780 ti 3GB superclocked?
December 25, 2013 3:19:44 PM

Yes, the ACX cooler is worth it. But why are you buying from that site?
m
0
l
December 25, 2013 3:22:26 PM

Francisco Costa said:
Yes, the ACX cooler is worth it. But why are you buying from that site?

Because its a local computer store near me and newegg.ca has no sales on right now
m
0
l
Related resources

Best solution

December 25, 2013 3:24:57 PM

Quote:
EVGA's GTX 780 Ti SuperClocked with ACX cooler delivers truly impressive performance. While the GTX 780 Ti is very fast already, EVGA topped it by quite a big margin with their overclock out of the box and the new ACX cooler. ACX plays a significant role in these improvements as it enables the card to run cooler, which results in better performance due to NVIDIA's GPU Boost 2.0 mechanism. When the GTX 780 Ti reaches its temperature target (82°C), Boost 2.0 will reduce clock frequencies to keep the card below that temperature. But the EVGA 780 Ti SC never reaches 82°C, which results in highest Boost clocks being active almost all the time (except for when power consumption is exceeded). We verified this with our clock speed analysis on page thirty. We then see the card 6% faster than the reference design when averaged over our benchmarks. At 2560x1600, the difference is even bigger with 8%, which matches the GTX 690's average performance! It's also a whopping 14% faster than the R9 290X in "Uber" mode and 20% faster than the R9 290X in "Quiet" mode. Had EVGA overclocked their memory, too, which is certainly possible given the use of fast 7 Gbps GDDR5 chips, we'd have seen an even bigger increase in performance.
Our manual overclocking tests revealed that the card has lots of manual overclocking potential left, reaching 1160 MHz base clock, which is a 15% OC on top of the 15% EVGA includes out of the box. I'm a bit skeptical of whether we will see such high overclocks on retail boards, but only time will tell. As mentioned before, memory overclocks well, reaching almost 2 GHz (8 GT/s effective), which gives the card more memory bandwidth than any R9 290X, even with manual overclocking.
EVGA's ACX cooler does a very good job at keeping the card cool. Temperatures are comfortably low, well below the 82°C temperature target. Noise levels are significantly reduced, too, but given the 72°C we saw in our testing, EVGA could have let the card run a bit warmer, maybe 75°C or slightly higher, to procure even better noise levels. That said, EVGA does advertises their ACX coolers as providing better temperatures, so "10°C cooler" was probably a marketing decision.
With a price of $730, the card is certainly not cheap. Compared to the $700 reference design, the difference is $30. Looking at performance per dollar, the card is actually better in that metric than NVIDIA's stock GTX 780 Ti. EVGA also includes an additional game, "Rise of the Triad," bringing the game bundle up to four titles. The GTX 780 Ti is clearly a premium product, which its pricing reflects. If you need to save money and can take the noise, the AMD's Radeon 290 Series could be an alternative. While I haven't reviewed any other custom GTX 780 Ti cards yet, the EVGA GTX 780 Ti SC with ACX cooler definitely sets the bar high for the competition.


From http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/EVGA/GTX_780_Ti_SC_A...

I'd be happy to own one, just not happy to buy one lol. I'm holding out for maxwell, feb-march-april time frame. This is one hell of a card though ;-)
Share
December 25, 2013 3:29:10 PM

clonazepam said:
Quote:
EVGA's GTX 780 Ti SuperClocked with ACX cooler delivers truly impressive performance. While the GTX 780 Ti is very fast already, EVGA topped it by quite a big margin with their overclock out of the box and the new ACX cooler. ACX plays a significant role in these improvements as it enables the card to run cooler, which results in better performance due to NVIDIA's GPU Boost 2.0 mechanism. When the GTX 780 Ti reaches its temperature target (82°C), Boost 2.0 will reduce clock frequencies to keep the card below that temperature. But the EVGA 780 Ti SC never reaches 82°C, which results in highest Boost clocks being active almost all the time (except for when power consumption is exceeded). We verified this with our clock speed analysis on page thirty. We then see the card 6% faster than the reference design when averaged over our benchmarks. At 2560x1600, the difference is even bigger with 8%, which matches the GTX 690's average performance! It's also a whopping 14% faster than the R9 290X in "Uber" mode and 20% faster than the R9 290X in "Quiet" mode. Had EVGA overclocked their memory, too, which is certainly possible given the use of fast 7 Gbps GDDR5 chips, we'd have seen an even bigger increase in performance.
Our manual overclocking tests revealed that the card has lots of manual overclocking potential left, reaching 1160 MHz base clock, which is a 15% OC on top of the 15% EVGA includes out of the box. I'm a bit skeptical of whether we will see such high overclocks on retail boards, but only time will tell. As mentioned before, memory overclocks well, reaching almost 2 GHz (8 GT/s effective), which gives the card more memory bandwidth than any R9 290X, even with manual overclocking.
EVGA's ACX cooler does a very good job at keeping the card cool. Temperatures are comfortably low, well below the 82°C temperature target. Noise levels are significantly reduced, too, but given the 72°C we saw in our testing, EVGA could have let the card run a bit warmer, maybe 75°C or slightly higher, to procure even better noise levels. That said, EVGA does advertises their ACX coolers as providing better temperatures, so "10°C cooler" was probably a marketing decision.
With a price of $730, the card is certainly not cheap. Compared to the $700 reference design, the difference is $30. Looking at performance per dollar, the card is actually better in that metric than NVIDIA's stock GTX 780 Ti. EVGA also includes an additional game, "Rise of the Triad," bringing the game bundle up to four titles. The GTX 780 Ti is clearly a premium product, which its pricing reflects. If you need to save money and can take the noise, the AMD's Radeon 290 Series could be an alternative. While I haven't reviewed any other custom GTX 780 Ti cards yet, the EVGA GTX 780 Ti SC with ACX cooler definitely sets the bar high for the competition.


From http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/EVGA/GTX_780_Ti_SC_A...

I'd be happy to own one, just not happy to buy one lol. I'm holding out for maxwell, feb-march-april time frame. This is one hell of a card though ;-)
what is maxwell a new GPU?

m
0
l
December 25, 2013 3:30:34 PM

Konane said:
clonazepam said:
Quote:
EVGA's GTX 780 Ti SuperClocked with ACX cooler delivers truly impressive performance. While the GTX 780 Ti is very fast already, EVGA topped it by quite a big margin with their overclock out of the box and the new ACX cooler. ACX plays a significant role in these improvements as it enables the card to run cooler, which results in better performance due to NVIDIA's GPU Boost 2.0 mechanism. When the GTX 780 Ti reaches its temperature target (82°C), Boost 2.0 will reduce clock frequencies to keep the card below that temperature. But the EVGA 780 Ti SC never reaches 82°C, which results in highest Boost clocks being active almost all the time (except for when power consumption is exceeded). We verified this with our clock speed analysis on page thirty. We then see the card 6% faster than the reference design when averaged over our benchmarks. At 2560x1600, the difference is even bigger with 8%, which matches the GTX 690's average performance! It's also a whopping 14% faster than the R9 290X in "Uber" mode and 20% faster than the R9 290X in "Quiet" mode. Had EVGA overclocked their memory, too, which is certainly possible given the use of fast 7 Gbps GDDR5 chips, we'd have seen an even bigger increase in performance.
Our manual overclocking tests revealed that the card has lots of manual overclocking potential left, reaching 1160 MHz base clock, which is a 15% OC on top of the 15% EVGA includes out of the box. I'm a bit skeptical of whether we will see such high overclocks on retail boards, but only time will tell. As mentioned before, memory overclocks well, reaching almost 2 GHz (8 GT/s effective), which gives the card more memory bandwidth than any R9 290X, even with manual overclocking.
EVGA's ACX cooler does a very good job at keeping the card cool. Temperatures are comfortably low, well below the 82°C temperature target. Noise levels are significantly reduced, too, but given the 72°C we saw in our testing, EVGA could have let the card run a bit warmer, maybe 75°C or slightly higher, to procure even better noise levels. That said, EVGA does advertises their ACX coolers as providing better temperatures, so "10°C cooler" was probably a marketing decision.
With a price of $730, the card is certainly not cheap. Compared to the $700 reference design, the difference is $30. Looking at performance per dollar, the card is actually better in that metric than NVIDIA's stock GTX 780 Ti. EVGA also includes an additional game, "Rise of the Triad," bringing the game bundle up to four titles. The GTX 780 Ti is clearly a premium product, which its pricing reflects. If you need to save money and can take the noise, the AMD's Radeon 290 Series could be an alternative. While I haven't reviewed any other custom GTX 780 Ti cards yet, the EVGA GTX 780 Ti SC with ACX cooler definitely sets the bar high for the competition.


From http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/EVGA/GTX_780_Ti_SC_A...

I'd be happy to own one, just not happy to buy one lol. I'm holding out for maxwell, feb-march-april time frame. This is one hell of a card though ;-)
what is maxwell a new GPU?



Nvidia's next generation of Cards.

To be honest I think people should completely boycott the 780ti until it has a sensible price tag.
m
0
l
December 25, 2013 3:31:43 PM

ImperialistMillitant said:
Konane said:
clonazepam said:
Quote:
EVGA's GTX 780 Ti SuperClocked with ACX cooler delivers truly impressive performance. While the GTX 780 Ti is very fast already, EVGA topped it by quite a big margin with their overclock out of the box and the new ACX cooler. ACX plays a significant role in these improvements as it enables the card to run cooler, which results in better performance due to NVIDIA's GPU Boost 2.0 mechanism. When the GTX 780 Ti reaches its temperature target (82°C), Boost 2.0 will reduce clock frequencies to keep the card below that temperature. But the EVGA 780 Ti SC never reaches 82°C, which results in highest Boost clocks being active almost all the time (except for when power consumption is exceeded). We verified this with our clock speed analysis on page thirty. We then see the card 6% faster than the reference design when averaged over our benchmarks. At 2560x1600, the difference is even bigger with 8%, which matches the GTX 690's average performance! It's also a whopping 14% faster than the R9 290X in "Uber" mode and 20% faster than the R9 290X in "Quiet" mode. Had EVGA overclocked their memory, too, which is certainly possible given the use of fast 7 Gbps GDDR5 chips, we'd have seen an even bigger increase in performance.
Our manual overclocking tests revealed that the card has lots of manual overclocking potential left, reaching 1160 MHz base clock, which is a 15% OC on top of the 15% EVGA includes out of the box. I'm a bit skeptical of whether we will see such high overclocks on retail boards, but only time will tell. As mentioned before, memory overclocks well, reaching almost 2 GHz (8 GT/s effective), which gives the card more memory bandwidth than any R9 290X, even with manual overclocking.
EVGA's ACX cooler does a very good job at keeping the card cool. Temperatures are comfortably low, well below the 82°C temperature target. Noise levels are significantly reduced, too, but given the 72°C we saw in our testing, EVGA could have let the card run a bit warmer, maybe 75°C or slightly higher, to procure even better noise levels. That said, EVGA does advertises their ACX coolers as providing better temperatures, so "10°C cooler" was probably a marketing decision.
With a price of $730, the card is certainly not cheap. Compared to the $700 reference design, the difference is $30. Looking at performance per dollar, the card is actually better in that metric than NVIDIA's stock GTX 780 Ti. EVGA also includes an additional game, "Rise of the Triad," bringing the game bundle up to four titles. The GTX 780 Ti is clearly a premium product, which its pricing reflects. If you need to save money and can take the noise, the AMD's Radeon 290 Series could be an alternative. While I haven't reviewed any other custom GTX 780 Ti cards yet, the EVGA GTX 780 Ti SC with ACX cooler definitely sets the bar high for the competition.


From http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/EVGA/GTX_780_Ti_SC_A...

I'd be happy to own one, just not happy to buy one lol. I'm holding out for maxwell, feb-march-april time frame. This is one hell of a card though ;-)
what is maxwell a new GPU?



Nvidia's next generation of Cards.

To be honest I think people should completely boycott the 780ti until it has a sensible price tag.


Hmmm so the 800 series then right?

m
0
l
December 25, 2013 3:33:31 PM

Yeah. nVidia's next architecture... it'll have a general purpose ARM cpu built in, so that might be interesting.
m
0
l
December 25, 2013 3:34:09 PM

Konane said:
ImperialistMillitant said:
Konane said:
clonazepam said:
Quote:
EVGA's GTX 780 Ti SuperClocked with ACX cooler delivers truly impressive performance. While the GTX 780 Ti is very fast already, EVGA topped it by quite a big margin with their overclock out of the box and the new ACX cooler. ACX plays a significant role in these improvements as it enables the card to run cooler, which results in better performance due to NVIDIA's GPU Boost 2.0 mechanism. When the GTX 780 Ti reaches its temperature target (82°C), Boost 2.0 will reduce clock frequencies to keep the card below that temperature. But the EVGA 780 Ti SC never reaches 82°C, which results in highest Boost clocks being active almost all the time (except for when power consumption is exceeded). We verified this with our clock speed analysis on page thirty. We then see the card 6% faster than the reference design when averaged over our benchmarks. At 2560x1600, the difference is even bigger with 8%, which matches the GTX 690's average performance! It's also a whopping 14% faster than the R9 290X in "Uber" mode and 20% faster than the R9 290X in "Quiet" mode. Had EVGA overclocked their memory, too, which is certainly possible given the use of fast 7 Gbps GDDR5 chips, we'd have seen an even bigger increase in performance.
Our manual overclocking tests revealed that the card has lots of manual overclocking potential left, reaching 1160 MHz base clock, which is a 15% OC on top of the 15% EVGA includes out of the box. I'm a bit skeptical of whether we will see such high overclocks on retail boards, but only time will tell. As mentioned before, memory overclocks well, reaching almost 2 GHz (8 GT/s effective), which gives the card more memory bandwidth than any R9 290X, even with manual overclocking.
EVGA's ACX cooler does a very good job at keeping the card cool. Temperatures are comfortably low, well below the 82°C temperature target. Noise levels are significantly reduced, too, but given the 72°C we saw in our testing, EVGA could have let the card run a bit warmer, maybe 75°C or slightly higher, to procure even better noise levels. That said, EVGA does advertises their ACX coolers as providing better temperatures, so "10°C cooler" was probably a marketing decision.
With a price of $730, the card is certainly not cheap. Compared to the $700 reference design, the difference is $30. Looking at performance per dollar, the card is actually better in that metric than NVIDIA's stock GTX 780 Ti. EVGA also includes an additional game, "Rise of the Triad," bringing the game bundle up to four titles. The GTX 780 Ti is clearly a premium product, which its pricing reflects. If you need to save money and can take the noise, the AMD's Radeon 290 Series could be an alternative. While I haven't reviewed any other custom GTX 780 Ti cards yet, the EVGA GTX 780 Ti SC with ACX cooler definitely sets the bar high for the competition.


From http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/EVGA/GTX_780_Ti_SC_A...

I'd be happy to own one, just not happy to buy one lol. I'm holding out for maxwell, feb-march-april time frame. This is one hell of a card though ;-)
what is maxwell a new GPU?



Nvidia's next generation of Cards.

To be honest I think people should completely boycott the 780ti until it has a sensible price tag.


Hmmm so the 800 series then right?



Yes I think so, I remember when the consensus was that AMD was going to name their new GPU's with the 8xxx name, like last generations. But they decided to call it...... the Rx series.

Also I "Think" thats whats nvidia is going to call them, im not certain.
m
0
l
December 25, 2013 3:34:37 PM

clonazepam said:
Yeah. nVidia's next architecture... it'll have a general purpose ARM cpu built in, so that might be interesting.
interesting so i was looking at this http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/graphics/display/201312232...

So in like 4 months maybe less the 800 series will be out maybe i should wait too

m
0
l
December 25, 2013 3:37:08 PM

On another note, I was really impressed with anantech's article on Sapphire's 290 with its custom cooler. It's super quiet. Overclocked, it'll beat a stock 780Ti in some games, or have lower avg fps but a higher minimum. It's a good read at the very least.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/7601/sapphire-radeon-r9-2...
m
0
l
December 25, 2013 3:49:16 PM

Konane said:
Think i should wait for the 800 series since its coming out in like 3-4 months maybe even less? according to http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/graphics/display/201312232...


That roadmap is based on a mobile chip. As they say, nvidia doesnt typically launch the new chip in mobile before the big daddy. I'm guessing that roadmap is old. Maxwell introduces some sort of unified memory architecture in hardware. CUDA 6 has unified memory architecture in software, and I believe is essentially available now. Those two things you would expect to arrive at the same time, so the software end is on schedule, and the hardware is late. That roadmap is probably based on the hardware being on time, or as originally planned. Clearly, I don't have a full understanding of what I just said, but you get the idea.
m
0
l
December 25, 2013 3:52:05 PM

You would absolutely enjoy a 780Ti today. How you feel in a couple months when and if Maxwell shows up? That's for you to say. If I had the disposable income, I'd be more than happy with a 780Ti today. I already have to wait a little while anyway.
m
0
l
December 25, 2013 4:09:45 PM

i was doing more research on when it would come out nobody really knows when it is coming out and even if it did it would take a year to have a card thats better than the 780ti superclocked anyways so i think im going to buy it and not worry about it
m
0
l
December 25, 2013 4:18:25 PM

clonazepam said:
You would absolutely enjoy a 780Ti today. How you feel in a couple months when and if Maxwell shows up? That's for you to say. If I had the disposable income, I'd be more than happy with a 780Ti today. I already have to wait a little while anyway.
when do you think the 800 series is coming out anyways?

m
0
l
April 20, 2014 3:47:29 AM

haha...
High end gpus will only rais head on early 2015
m
0
l
!