Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Power Supply Compatibility and Graphics Card Replacement

Last response: in Components
Share
December 26, 2013 3:57:33 PM

Hello, first time here, and I was curious if the Toms could help me out with a compatibility question. I'm reading about the form factor dimensions of power supplies, and I'm replacing the stock 300W PSU in my HP desktop. Information on my computer here: http://h20566.www2.hp.com/portal/site/hpsc/template.PAG...

I'm not much of a techie, but I was reading and need more power for my first graphics card! It's a Geforce GTX 650ti Boost, not too shabby; my Xmas was quite bountiful! Information on the card here:
http://www.geforce.com/hardware/desktop-gpus/geforce-gt...

But I read it requires a minimum of a 450W PSU, that's the suggested PSU I think. And so I've been shopping around Newegg, and have found a couple that seem like they fit. But finding a 5.9 x 5.5 x 3.4 is really hard. I have my eye on this PSU:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Now my questions are:

1. Do I need a PCI e cable for some reason with my new graphics card? I have no idea what a PCIe cable does so I'm not able to really make an informed decision on whether or not I need one with my PSU.

2. A Micro ATX, correct, will NOT replace my stock 300W PSU? The stock PSU is ATX, but it specifies it as internal. The dimensions seem standard, except that finding a replacement is difficult, as none of the PSUs I've found match it exactly... something they're as much as inches off, but mostly between half an inch and negligible difference.

2a. Finding the right dimensions is really hard! Also how am I supposed to intelligently choose at a glance? Does an ATXv12 fit into an ATX? Because the dimensions seem larger on these PSUs. Will I have to buy a new tower in order to get a PSU that will work?

3. Can I expect any issues in compatibility since the onboard graphics card is an AMD Radeon 6530d? I've heard that NVIDIA and Radeon don't mix well, and if I'd have shopped for a better starting machine I've have chosen one with onboard NVIDIA, but oh well. Can I expect to fight this machine to accept the graphics card?

4. Placeholder for when I return after installing everything only to have fried my computer. :p 

UPDATE: Added links to better show what pieces I'm talking about, and accidentally typed 400W instead of 450W. :p 

Best solution

a b ) Power supply
a b U Graphics card
December 26, 2013 4:17:44 PM

The Psu's are a standard size, but you can get smaller models that work well in mini-itx builds. They aren't as long as most others is the difference.

All higher end video cards will require at least one PCI-E 6 pin power connection, and possibly 2, or 6+2, or 2 6+2 connections, or a 6 and a 6+2 connection. The cable will come with your new PSU, I'd buy a good enough quality Psu that will probably come with 2 6 or 6+2 connections minimum.

There won't be any issue with your onboard video and an nVidia card. You'll be wanting to disable the onboard when you use the new card though.

If you are shopping newegg, I'll give you a couple of options that are a good quality and enough power for your system.

Actually, I'll include an amazon Psu because I don't like the prices on newegg atm. http://www.amazon.com/dp/B006TVQTFE/?tag=pcpapi-20

You'll want at least a 500w Psu, up to probably 650w depending on price differences. Seasonic, Xfx, Corsair(non-cx and gs series), Antec, Ocz are all good manufacturers. I'd go with at least a bronze efficiency, and semi-modular/modular is always nice.
Share
December 26, 2013 4:24:48 PM

Swordkd said:
The Psu's are a standard size, but you can get smaller models that work well in mini-itx builds. They aren't as long as most others is the difference.

All higher end video cards will require at least one PCI-E 6 pin power connection, and possibly 2, or 6+2, or 2 6+2 connections, or a 6 and a 6+2 connection. The cable will come with your new PSU, I'd buy a good enough quality Psu that will probably come with 2 6 or 6+2 connections minimum.

There won't be any issue with your onboard video and an nVidia card. You'll be wanting to disable the onboard when you use the new card though.

If you are shopping newegg, I'll give you a couple of options that are a good quality and enough power for your system.

Actually, I'll include an amazon Psu because I don't like the prices on newegg atm. http://www.amazon.com/dp/B006TVQTFE/?tag=pcpapi-20

You'll want at least a 500w Psu, up to probably 650w depending on price differences. Seasonic, Xfx, Corsair(non-cx and gs series), Antec, Ocz are all good manufacturers. I'd go with at least a bronze efficiency, and semi-modular/modular is always nice.


Thanks for the fast reply! I didn't realize I might need a larger Wattage PSU, but I had that feeling. ;) 
I'm so glad I asked about the PCIe cable, I'd have never known haha. So something like this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

This PSU would be a better choice? It has a PCIe cable. I don't want to swarm you with questions all at once sorry! Thanks a bunch for the help.

m
0
l
Related resources
a b ) Power supply
a b U Graphics card
December 26, 2013 4:34:40 PM

Crap, yeah. I didn't realize the link I'd shared was so much. Was showing much cheaper than that when I looked at it. SeaSonic makes some of the best Psu's out there, and that would be a great option with plenty of power for you.
m
0
l
December 26, 2013 4:44:22 PM

Swordkd said:
Crap, yeah. I didn't realize the link I'd shared was so much. Was showing much cheaper than that when I looked at it. SeaSonic makes some of the best Psu's out there, and that would be a great option with plenty of power for you.


Yeah I'm trying to keep it on the cheap without settling for less than I want. The Seasonic looks really good, I'm probably going to get it, it's got a 6pin PCIe cable for my graphics card, I don't think I'll have any issues with actual installation. I may not know hardware but hot dang do I know screwdriver. I might be forgetting something, but it fits dimensions, has the wattage, and will power my card. So I think I've got all the information I need to buy it unless you think of something else I'm missing? Thanks so much for helping me out btw.
m
0
l
December 26, 2013 4:57:43 PM

Swordkd said:
Crap, yeah. I didn't realize the link I'd shared was so much. Was showing much cheaper than that when I looked at it. SeaSonic makes some of the best Psu's out there, and that would be a great option with plenty of power for you.


Oh wait so Corsair CX PSUs I should steer clear of? You mentioned it in your previous post. I did find one of them at 600W and is only 5 bucks more than the SeaSonic, was wondering why it was so cheap.

UPDATE: Yeah, the Corsair CX cable and install issues I want nothing to do with. Thanks a bunch to Swordkd, you saved my life! Or at least the life of my computer. I've got my answer.
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
a b U Graphics card
December 26, 2013 5:05:48 PM

That series, and the Gs series aren't as good as the rest of them, so I'd avoid them. They are generally used for extreme budget builds, because they aren't bad units, just cheaper than what usually gets recommended. With sales you can usually find them between 30 dollars and 50 dollars though, which again, plays well into budget builds.
m
0
l
December 26, 2013 5:17:23 PM

Swordkd said:
That series, and the Gs series aren't as good as the rest of them, so I'd avoid them. They are generally used for extreme budget builds, because they aren't bad units, just cheaper than what usually gets recommended. With sales you can usually find them between 30 dollars and 50 dollars though, which again, plays well into budget builds.


Yeah seemed some buyers were a bit upset that it was too "budget" for them. Personally you get what you paid for. I went with the 620W Seasonic, it was only 5 bucks more than the 520W and I figured what the hell. Maybe for my birthday I'll give myself a new tower and build my own computer instead of getting one out of a box. It certainly seems cheaper. Thanks a bunch Sword!
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
a b U Graphics card
December 26, 2013 8:20:45 PM

No problem, that 620w SeaSonic is a nice unit and would work great for a new build with only one video card. Doesn't cost much to build yourself a new system, especially if you can reuse parts from your older tower for a bit. Memory, HDD, optical drive would all work for a new build, but you'd replace them all later on. Just lets you spend less money to get the main parts new and working now.
m
0
l
December 26, 2013 9:43:33 PM

Swordkd said:
No problem, that 620w SeaSonic is a nice unit and would work great for a new build with only one video card. Doesn't cost much to build yourself a new system, especially if you can reuse parts from your older tower for a bit. Memory, HDD, optical drive would all work for a new build, but you'd replace them all later on. Just lets you spend less money to get the main parts new and working now.


Precisely. I've got the 8gb of stock RAM that came with the machine, but I think that's next on the list. It's simple to install, simple to choose, and easy to understand. But after that I'm going to have to do some reading about how to replace all the other parts, like a motherboard. Heck I don't even know what a motherboard does, but I know if I want a good gaming rig I should probably replace it. Air cooling? That's for scrubs. GO COOLANT TOWER. Haha.
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
a b U Graphics card
December 26, 2013 9:49:14 PM

Wait on the ram. You've got ddr3 1333mhz, which will work in new rigs now. Not the best choice, but since you already have the ram no reason to upgrade...yet. The next part I'd buy is a new case, since you can move everything you have now, into it, and it'll give you a nice basis for building your new rig. The big jump you'll have is motherboard/Cpu because those two parts have to be replaced at the same time. Once that is all done, you can buy either ddr3 1600mhz, or 1866/2133mhz if the pricing is good. Depending on what Cpu you get, then aftermarket cooling becomes an option too.
m
0
l
!