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increasing Base clock (bus speed) on i5 3470 dangerous and advise

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December 26, 2013 4:31:18 PM

Hi, recently i found out i can get my cpu to 4.0ghz with 10000 bus speed and if i increase it with 500 (so 10500 or 105 :D ) it coud go upp to 4.2ghz and my question is it dangerous to increase base clock within normal temmps?? :)  im thinking of buying 212 evo :) 

Rest of my specs

8gb Kingonstone DDR3 HyperX 1640mhz RAM (little OC)
Gainward GTX 780 Phantom oc to 1ghz/6.5ghz (this card is amazing and here in my country i bought gainward because in norway we have 5 years warranty on any pc component ;D)
Intel core i5 3470
Msi z77a gd-65 gaming
Cheifteck 1200watt
Samsung Evo 250gb
WD 5000aaks (500gb)
a b K Overclocking
January 12, 2014 4:35:08 PM

No, Changing your base clock is not "Dangerous" per say.

Increasing your base clock does have the affect of overclocking everything in your system (ram, pci express, uncore, cpu core, etc and anything else that uses it as a reference clock. If you can do it that is fantastic just keep a close eye on your stability.
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January 13, 2014 9:21:23 AM

Hi :)  I have a lga 1155 and ive been told that it is dangerous, So youre are totaly sure? :)  -GreedyMuffin :) 
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a b K Overclocking
January 13, 2014 5:57:30 PM

If you can make it work then its not dangerous, the problem is very small changes 5 to 7% can cause instability issues. Someone please correct me if I am wrong however the only problem I know of is the difficulty attaining stability.

From Bit-tech forum
"CPU Base Clock Since Intel choose to use just one clockgen on Sandy Bridge hardware (apparently due to the way the internal CPU ring bus memory controller needs to stay in sync - see What's New in Intel's Sandy Bridge for more on this), this value has a maximum adjustment of under 10MHz, or just 10 per cent. As such, much more acute 10KHz (0.1MHz) adjustments have been added by all major motherboard manufacturers to allow some changes.

Matched with voltage changes listed below, you should be able to increase the base clock to 105MHz on all CPUs, and we've found a few will go as far as 107MHz, if you go nuts with the voltages. While a Base Clock as high as 107.8MHz might unlock 2,300MHz memory speeds, the extra voltage (and motherboard stress) generally isn't worth it for an everyday overclock. The bottom line with the Base Clock is that generally you don't have to touch it."
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January 13, 2014 10:06:20 PM

Bonecrushrr said:
If you can make it work then its not dangerous, the problem is very small changes 5 to 7% can cause instability issues. Someone please correct me if I am wrong however the only problem I know of is the difficulty attaining stability.

From Bit-tech forum
"CPU Base Clock Since Intel choose to use just one clockgen on Sandy Bridge hardware (apparently due to the way the internal CPU ring bus memory controller needs to stay in sync - see What's New in Intel's Sandy Bridge for more on this), this value has a maximum adjustment of under 10MHz, or just 10 per cent. As such, much more acute 10KHz (0.1MHz) adjustments have been added by all major motherboard manufacturers to allow some changes.

Matched with voltage changes listed below, you should be able to increase the base clock to 105MHz on all CPUs, and we've found a few will go as far as 107MHz, if you go nuts with the voltages. While a Base Clock as high as 107.8MHz might unlock 2,300MHz memory speeds, the extra voltage (and motherboard stress) generally isn't worth it for an everyday overclock. The bottom line with the Base Clock is that generally you don't have to touch it."


Ahhh Okay :)  someine said that i coud frie my system, Mine is fine at 1.8 at 4ghz (i5 3470)
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a b K Overclocking
January 13, 2014 10:43:54 PM

Good luck and be sure to post back how you make out.
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!