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Problems running internet to a shed

Last response: in Networking
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December 30, 2013 11:37:09 AM

I'm having an issue getting internet to a shed that's about 200 Ft from the main router Line of Sight.
I Was going to bury the line all the way but there is electrical lines, cable lines, sidewalks and a driveway all in the way. I have tried the windows ics but I have had too many issues and have to leave a pc running 24/7 and I'm not going to have that. Now, from the garage next to the driveway I have a clean line to the shed to bury at about 180 FT. but I don't have a clean line to the garage which is about 90 FT. any suggestions??

The shed will be set up for online gaming and Netflix streaming with multiple devices using a switch and a router to broadcast wifi in the shed. the shed is wired with CAT6 for streaming from a media server and I have 500FT Solid Copper Core Direct Burial Cat5e for the Internet transfer.

Any help is greaty appreciated

Best solution

a b X LAN
a b 2 Internet access
a c 203 F Wireless
December 30, 2013 11:59:46 AM

If you can bury CAT5e that would work fine, but if not you can use a pair of outdoor directional wireless APs. Since it is line of sight it is a pretty easy solution for a few hundred dollars and very good speed using Ubiquiti outdoor directional wireless APs that are set up like this picture:


A COUPLE OF THESE would work as outdoor APs.
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December 30, 2013 1:12:30 PM

RealBeast said:
If you can bury CAT5e that would work fine, but if not you can use a pair of outdoor directional wireless APs. Since it is line of sight it is a pretty easy solution for a few hundred dollars and very good speed using Ubiquiti outdoor directional wireless APs that are set up like this picture:


A COUPLE OF THESE would work as outdoor APs.


Would this setup require a PC to be on at all times??
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a b X LAN
a b 2 Internet access
a c 203 F Wireless
December 30, 2013 1:25:21 PM

No, that is one of the big advantages, each end has a router (one a real router, the other configured as an AP), the one in the main location is the router that runs the network and the other in the remote location is configured as an AP that provides wireless and wired connections to the remote location -- no computer needed other than during a brief period to configure it.
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December 31, 2013 1:35:11 AM

RealBeast said:
No, that is one of the big advantages, each end has a router (one a real router, the other configured as an AP), the one in the main location is the router that runs the network and the other in the remote location is configured as an AP that provides wireless and wired connections to the remote location -- no computer needed other than during a brief period to configure it.


What are the devices that have the pc/cpe connection labels??
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December 31, 2013 1:42:04 AM

Assuming you have a power supply in the shed that originates from the house you could try powerline connectors. A cheap solution if it works.
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a b X LAN
a b 2 Internet access
a c 203 F Wireless
December 31, 2013 5:55:23 AM

Slycooper91 said:
RealBeast said:
No, that is one of the big advantages, each end has a router (one a real router, the other configured as an AP), the one in the main location is the router that runs the network and the other in the remote location is configured as an AP that provides wireless and wired connections to the remote location -- no computer needed other than during a brief period to configure it.


What are the devices that have the pc/cpe connection labels??


Those are the PoE (power over ethernet) power injector ports -- the Ethernet cables carry the power to run the outside AP so there is no separate outside power connection needed. The PC indicates the PC side Ethernet port and the CPE the Ethernet port out to the outdoor access point.

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December 31, 2013 8:37:41 PM

RealBeast said:
Slycooper91 said:
RealBeast said:
No, that is one of the big advantages, each end has a router (one a real router, the other configured as an AP), the one in the main location is the router that runs the network and the other in the remote location is configured as an AP that provides wireless and wired connections to the remote location -- no computer needed other than during a brief period to configure it.


What are the devices that have the pc/cpe connection labels??


Those are the PoE (power over ethernet) power injector ports -- the Ethernet cables carry the power to run the outside AP so there is no separate outside power connection needed. The PC indicates the PC side Ethernet port and the CPE the Ethernet port out to the outdoor access point.



What kind of programming would be required on the receiving side to have this setup work??
And since I can receive 2-3 bars with a low power wifi antenna can I getaway with the antenna on just the shed side?
would these two pieces work together ?? I have never worked much in networking stuff so im pretty lost.
Antenna
PoE
Wire
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a b X LAN
a b 2 Internet access
a c 203 F Wireless
January 1, 2014 6:12:15 AM

They work as a pair, one at each end. While this may seem complex, it is actually quite simple -- it is the modern equivalent of two cans and a string. :) 

The Antenna includes everything that you need (including a PoE injector), other than extra Ethernet cable. That cable that you linked will work fine, although you will need to measure the lengths that you need. I would use no more than 50 feet from the indoor router LAN port to the injector and then no more than 200 feet after the injector to the AP unit outside.

There is very little programming to do other than to set some static IP addresses, one for each AP. They are no more complex than indoor access points really.
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January 1, 2014 10:19:51 AM

The Ubiquiti kit works well - we have four 5GHz AP's as described above that work well - and cover 9 miles!
It's the only way we can get broadband...
House to shed - dead easy and very fast. You may need to turn the power settings down a bit for such a short distance, since otherwise you'll be broadcasting to your neighbours...
No problem out here where we are - it's only sheep...

Powerline adaptors would seem to be a simpler and cheaper solution though..
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January 1, 2014 11:19:05 PM

Ijack said:
Assuming you have a power supply in the shed that originates from the house you could try powerline connectors. A cheap solution if it works.


The shed and house are on separate meters unfortunatly

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January 2, 2014 6:28:54 AM

Other option, have cable/phone comapny run separate drop [since you have separate power meters] they will run it on their dime if its not too far from plant, locate and bore as necessary, and then the tenant of the shed gets a separate account and his own modem and his/her own bill. The only reason you would want to run Ethernet from your house is for INTRANET stuff not internet stuff, they can just have their own separate account and and then their actions do not affect YOUR account in case they are crazy and like to try to hack the DOJ or download 24-7 and violate caps, etc...
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