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Does the motherboard BIOS only work on some versions of Windows?

Hi all, :)

I'm hoping to do a dual boot of Windows 7 (64bit), XP (32bit) and Linux.

At the moment I'm using Windows 7 (64bit), and my motherboard is a Asus P8Z68-V PRO/GEN3.

On the driver page for the motherboard (here) it lists two versions of the latest BIOS (3603), one for XP and Vista, and one for Windows 7 and 8.

I know I have the latest version, but I can't remember having to pick a version that said it was only for 7 and 8.

Will it not work with XP, or is it just saying that the installer is for 7 and 8, but the BIOS will work for all four?
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  1. Best answer
    panmanthe2nd said:
    Hi all, :)

    I'm hoping to do a dual boot of Windows 7 (64bit), XP (32bit) and Linux.

    At the moment I'm using Windows 7 (64bit), and my motherboard is a Asus P8Z68-V PRO/GEN3.

    On the driver page for the motherboard (here) it lists two versions of the latest BIOS (3603), one for XP and Vista, and one for Windows 7 and 8.

    I know I have the latest version, but I can't remember having to pick a version that said it was only for 7 and 8.

    Will it not work with XP, or is it just saying that the installer is for 7 and 8, but the BIOS will work for all four?


    That's just the BIOS installer, run it in 7 and then install the rest (linux last). Windows is not going to be happy about installing XP after 7 however. If you have to, install the BIOS with 7, delete 7, install XP, then 7 then linux. Always linux last because windows over writes the linux boot loader while linux adds windows to it's boot menu. Or you could run XP in a vmware virtual in either 7 or linux.
  2. stillblue said:

    That's just the BIOS installer, run it in 7 and then install the rest (linux last). Windows is not going to be happy about installing XP after 7 however. If you have to, install the BIOS with 7, delete 7, install XP, then 7 then linux. Always linux last because windows over writes the linux boot loader while linux adds windows to it's boot menu. Or you could run XP in a vmware virtual in either 7 or linux.


    Thanks!

    The other item I'm wondering is about using a custom boot manager.

    The two features I'm looking for are:

    1) I want it to boot into Windows 7 without asking me if I want to boot into another OS.
    2) I would like to be able to boot into the other OS's from Windows 7 (for example a 'Restart in Windows XP' button that turns Windows 7 off, and XP on)

    Is there any software that can do this for me?
  3. panmanthe2nd said:
    stillblue said:

    That's just the BIOS installer, run it in 7 and then install the rest (linux last). Windows is not going to be happy about installing XP after 7 however. If you have to, install the BIOS with 7, delete 7, install XP, then 7 then linux. Always linux last because windows over writes the linux boot loader while linux adds windows to it's boot menu. Or you could run XP in a vmware virtual in either 7 or linux.


    Thanks!

    The other item I'm wondering is about using a custom boot manager.

    The two features I'm looking for are:

    1) I want it to boot into Windows 7 without asking me if I want to boot into another OS.
    2) I would like to be able to boot into the other OS's from Windows 7 (for example a 'Restart in Windows XP' button that turns Windows 7 off, and XP on)

    Is there any software that can do this for me?



    1) Yes, grub, the linux bootloader can be configured to default to any system. we'll do that when you complete your install and tell us which linux you have installed.
    2) No. You cannot switch between installed systems like that. You must boot into the system that you wish to use. you can, however install virtualbox into any of the systems you've described and then create virtual systems within the host system that you can open within the operating system you booted to. Depending on what your aim is for having three systems that is a definite option.
  4. There is a program that allows you to switch Operating Systems in the way you describe (iReboot), but it does automatically reboot the computer.

    http://neosmart.net/iReboot/
  5. stillblue said:

    1) Yes, grub, the linux bootloader can be configured to default to any system. we'll do that when you complete your install and tell us which linux you have installed.


    I found it hard to pick which Linux I wanted to use, but I've now picked Linux Mint (release 16). I'm downloading an ISO for it now.

    Is there anything I should know before I install the OSs?

    Anonymous said:
    There is a program that allows you to switch Operating Systems in the way you describe (iReboot), but it does automatically reboot the computer.

    http://neosmart.net/iReboot/


    Thank you! I think that this will be perfect. I'll have a look at it now.
  6. panmanthe2nd said:
    stillblue said:

    1) Yes, grub, the linux bootloader can be configured to default to any system. we'll do that when you complete your install and tell us which linux you have installed.


    I found it hard to pick which Linux I wanted to use, but I've now picked Linux Mint (release 16). I'm downloading an ISO for it now.

    Is there anything I should know before I install the OSs?

    Anonymous said:
    There is a program that allows you to switch Operating Systems in the way you describe (iReboot), but it does automatically reboot the computer.

    http://neosmart.net/iReboot/


    Thank you! I think that this will be perfect. I'll have a look at it now.



    Just oldest to newest windows then linux. It might be best to create partitions for how much space for each windows leaving empty space for mint to create it's own. When you are finished make a note of how many lines down the selection list is found the system you want to boot by default.
  7. The other day I tried to install Windows XP, but I had forgot that I would need Sata drivers to use my harddrives in AHCI mode.

    I have two options:

    1) Slipstream the drivers onto the Windows XP CD using nlite (or a similar software)

    or 2) Put the drivers onto a floppy disc, and press F6 at the start of installing Windows XP.

    My computer doesn't have a floppy drive, but Microsoft (here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/916196) has a list of USB floppy drives that work. Does anyone know of where in the UK I could get one these?

    However, slipstreaming the drivers would probably be the easier option.

    When I do it, is it only the 'Intel(R) AHCI/RAID Driver' that I need, or do I need to slipstream the 'Intel Chipset Driver' too?
  8. I tried to do this today, but I had BIG problems, and now I can't boot into Windows 7. :(

    I've started a post about it here: http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/answers/id-1989686/boot-windows-blinking-underscore.html
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